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SHILOH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH — 1984 



SHILOH 

II 



METHODIST CHURCH 
1814-1984 

ALAMANCE COUNTY, N. C. 



BY 

ROCKIE D. IROXLER 

As Commissioned by the 

Committee on History 

of 

SHILOH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

June 1984 



IV 



Preface $^5* 

As a child grows he experiences feel ingsi rela- 
tionships, and teachings that shape his character 
and become very important to him. The source of much 
of this influence is his parents, as they guide and 
support him through years of development. However, 
an equally important influence upon his life is that 
of the Church. 

The Church is where he learns the stories of 
Jesus and shares them with his friends. He takes 
part in programs and activities that are a great deal 
more than simple entertainment. From the scriptures 
he learns the meaning of fellowship and dedication, 
and realizes the correlation of these concepts and 
the motivations of the people around him. He feels 
the loving bond of the people of the Church, and is 
happy to consider them all members of his family. As 
he matures he experiences for himself the Glory of 
God, and he comes to truly understand the sacrifice 
that was made for him upon the cross. 

I experienced these feelings as did all those 
who grew up in the community of Shiloh United Metho- 
dist Church. This small country church abounds with 
the love of God, and graciously touches the lives of 
so many. Hearts and minds are shared with old 
friends, while arms are joyfully extended to new 



VI 



ones. Spirits are nurtured, needs are bountifully 
met, and all praises are given back to the One who 
grants blessings so freely. 

Shiloh is a home of the heart that was created 
by God as an instrument of his will. As we read of 
its earthly beginnings, we should stop to give 
thanks that each of us have known the joy of Shiloh, 
and will continue to know that joy forever. 



Leigh Ann Gilliam 



vn 



Dedication 

This book is dedicated to the Glory of God and 
to the many saints in Shiloh's history, past and pre- 
sent, who have labored long and hard that we might 
have a place to worship and praise our Saviour, to 
meet in fellowship with our friends and neighbors, 
or to glorify God together, and serve the cause of 
Christ in our community. 

As we go through this book we will feel the pain 
and struggle that some have endured that we might 
have this place of worship so dear to our hearts. We 
also feel the joy and victory made possible by Christ. 

May we ever be more thankful for this book of 
history and use it as a stepping stone to carry our 
Church's work forward so other generations might 
build and expand upon it. May every song sung and 
every prayer raised be praised and glorified in our 
fellowship. 

Our community and Church wil 1 forever be grateful 
for our Church History Committee and its work that we 
might look into our past, love the present, and look 
forward to the future with thanksgiving in our hearts 
for all the wonderful blessings God has given to us, 
and especially to our Church SHILOH. 



Love in Christ, 
Alvin N. Herb in 
Administrative Board Chairman 



Vlll 



Acknowledgements 



Acknowledgement is gratefully made to the following 
agents, authors, and persons who have contributed to 
the procurement of the information necessary to pub- 
lish this work. 



Alamance County Register of Deeds. Graham, N. C. 

Alamance County Tax Supervisor. Courthouse Annex. 
Graham, N. C. Tax Maps. 

Duke University. Divinity School Library. Durham, 
N. C. Dr. Farris. Use of this repository with 
the consent of Dr. Farris allowed for much docu- 
mentation via the Conference Journals along with 
other valuable resources. 

Duke University. William R. Perkins Library. Manu- 
script Department. Durham, N. C. William R. 
Erwin, Jr., Curator. This department, with the 
especial aid of Mr. Erwin, provided free access 
to the rare historical documents and manuscripts 
in their custody. 

Estate Records. Alamance County. Graham, N. C. Wills. 



IX 



Lewis, Alton P. Memoirs concerning the Shiloh Church 
community and reflections on past occurrences 
and acquaintances. 

May Memorial Library. Burlington, N. C. Alamance 
County Historical Records. 

N.C. State Library. Raleigh, N. C. Methodist Church 
Historical Records. 

N.C. State Library. Archives Division. Raleigh, N.C. 

Orange County Register of Deeds. Hillsboro, N. C. 
Deeds and Wills. 

Shiloh United Methodist Church. Committee on History. 

Clarence C. Matkins, Chairman 

Edna Re id 

Eff ie Workman 

Rockie Troxler 

Rev. Randy L. Wall, Pastor 

Shiloh United Methodist Church. Members whose first 
hand accounts and personal historical data were 
offered, provide the basis upon which this work 
is made possible. 

Technical College of Alamance. Library. Haw River, 
N. C. Federal Census Records. 



x 



The Author's Introduction 

Several factors are of prime importance in the 
collection of the information necessary to complete 
a volume such as what we find herein. Availability 
of data must undoubtedly rank as a priority, for a 
lack of it leaves us with nothing to view our past. 
Even glimpses of our past, through word-of -mouth or 
documented material , provide us with an excitement 
difficult to match, as we visualize those who have 
prepared before us that which we now enjoy and cher- 
ish Shiloh. We find that indeed a substantial 

amount of information has been left behind for us to 
piece together, and rediscover the past as our fore- 
fathers and founders saw it. Not to be discounted, 
for certain, are the unwritten stories and accounts 
which have been handed down from generation to gen- 
eration. Time and again these oral clues substanti- 
ate and clarify other documents. The information 
which we have access to comes from individuals, 
family records, land deeds of public record, federal 
census records, church and conference manuscripts, 
conference journals, tax maps, history books and 
historical sketches, past preachers' personal notes, 
periodicals, and other resources . The close proximity 
of institutions such as the Duke Divinity School and 
Duke University Perkins Library in Durham, N.C. and 



XI 



and the able assistance of their staff, also was a 
necessity in procurement of much of the information 
required to complete these pages. Other repositories 
such as the N. C. State Archives in Raleigh, the 
Orange County Register of Deeds in Hillsboro, the 
Alamance County Register of Deeds in Graham, and the 
May Memorial Library of Burlington provide furthur 
information by which our facts are augmented. 

Characteristically, this publication subjects 
itself to the same problem that faces all historical 
publications purporting to be based on fact, and 
that problem is errors. Errors can be merely typo- 
graphical, or due to failure in interpretation, 
classification, completeness, original documentation, 
and a variety of other inconsistencies. Subsequently, 
the responsibility for all errors of this volume lies 
with this writer. Every effort has been made to com- 
pile and report all information as accurately and 
factually as ability dictates. Where necessary, in- 
formation which needs to be qualified or may be sub- 
ject to question is treated with careful attention 
to sources and opinion. 

As we research, compile, and coordinate infor- 
mation in an attempt to rebuild the past history of 
Shiloh, we quickly discover that an essential part 



xn 



of that background is interdependent with the history 
of Methodism and the Methodist Church itself. There- 
fore, it benefits us to understand and study the 
Methodist Church from its inception, and how Shiloh 
grew and developed because of its interelation with 
Methodism. A brief history of Methodism, the Metho- 
dist Church and its organization, and other associated 
articles are included as an integral element of this 
work. In addition to our founding, we will also find 
within these pages the background of Shiloh Methodist 
Church's property, its buildings, the membership, our 
first Sunday School , the individual working groups , 
as well as its past preachers and circuits of the 
everchanging districts . 

Because of the diverse subject matter and exten- 
sive lists of names and other topics, it is doubtful 
that any one individual would find all the included 
material to his own personal interest. Hopefully, 
however, everyone will find some subject or topic 
which is consistent with their own interests. Perhaps 
these pages will provide some others with a reference 
to use for future work or as a guide to research 
their own church history. 

R. D. T. 



Xlll 



SHILOH 



METHODIST CHURCH 



1814 -1984 



The Contents 



Face Picture 

Preface 

Dedication 

Acknowl edgements 

The Author's Introduction 

The Contents 

The Illustrations 



n 

vi, vii 

viii 

ix, x 

xi, xii, xiii 

xv, xvi, xvii 

xviii 



CHAPTER 1 



THE BUILDINGS 



1-20 



The First Building 1 

The Second Building 4 

The Third Building 5 

The Improvements 9 

Other Building Appurtenances 15 



CHAPTER 2 



THE LAND 



21-37 



Shiloh's Beginning 

Adding On 

The Lost Deed 

Modifications 

Lost Property Returns 



21 
27 
29 
32 
35 



CHAPTER 3 



THE CHURCH 



38-80 



The Formative Years 39 

William Matkins 41 

Community Leaders and Worship 44 

The Membership 53 

Shiloh Church Membership Roll 55 



xv 



CHAPTER 4 

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL 81-94 

The Origin 81 
Early Formation in the 

Methodist Church 82 

The Sunday School in America 83 

Sunday School in the N. C. 

Conference 84 

Shi 1 oh Sunday School 85 

CHAPTER 5 

THE WORKING GROUPS 95-119 



The Music 




95 


The Boy Scouts 




99 


The Methodist Women 




106 


Shiloh's Women's Group 




108 


The Young People 




111 


Vacation Bible School 




114 


The Methodist Men 




116 


CHAPTER 


6 




THE PASTORS 






Servants of God 




120 


Biographical Sketches 




123 


CHAPTER 


7 





120-134 



THE CONFERENCE 135-145 

Organization 135 

Appointments of Shiloh Church 139 



xvi 



CHAPTER 8 

THE METHODIST MOVEMENT 146-150 

Methodism 146 

Methodism in North Carolina 149 

CHAPTER 9 

THE CEMETERY 151-159 

Hallowed Ground 151 

Shiloh Cemetery Interred 154 

APPENDICES 

APPENDIX A Shiloh Church Deed of 1814 160 

APPENDIX B Shiloh Church Deed of 1836 163 

APPENDIX C Shiloh Church Quit Claim Deed 

of 1895 166 

APPENDIX D Shiloh Church Deed of 1915 169 

APPENDIX E Shiloh Church Deed of 1943 172 

APPENDIX F Shiloh Church Deed of 1963 175 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 179-181 

INDEX 182-206 



XVI 1 



The Illustrations 



PAGE 



FACE PAGE Shiloh Church 1984 Face 

ILLUS. 1.1 Shiloh Church 1895 6 

ILLUS. 1.2 Shiloh Church 1936 6 

ILLUS. 1.3 Shiloh Church 1953 8 

ILLUS. 1.4 Shiloh Church Pulpit 14 

ILLUS. 1.5 Shiloh Church Picnic Tables 16 

ILLUS. 1.6 Shiloh Church Scout Hut 16 

ILLUS. 1.7 Burlington Circuit Parsonage 1903-60 18 

ILLUS. 1.8 Shiloh Church Parsonage 1960-63 18 

ILLUS. 1.9 Shiloh Church Parsonage 1963-84 20 

MAP 2.1 William Matkin's Property 1827 23 

MAP 2.2 Shiloh Church Property 1814 26 

MAP 2.3 Shiloh Church Property 1836 28 

MAP 2.4 Shiloh Church Property 1895 31 

MAP 2.5 Shiloh Church Property 1984 34 

MAP 3.1 Andrew Lewis Property 1860 45 

ILLUS. 5.1 Honorary Pall Bearers at Funeral of 

Clarence Wade and Gene Lewis 101 

ILLUS. 5.2 Vacation Bible School 1947 115 

ILLUS. 9.1 Tombstone of Clarence Wade and 

Gene Lewis 153 



xvin 



1 

The Buildings 

THE FIRST BUILDING 

The true origin of Shiloh, the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church of Alamance County, N. C. , may never be 
known. But from the extant records which are avail- 
able and the history which comes to us by word of 
mouth that has passed down through the generations, 
we can learn about much of the early days. The ear- 
liest information of record may quite possibly be the 
origin of Shiloh, but that cannot be assumed with 
certainty. 

A letter dated June 3, 1933 from Ludie Lewis 
Ector, eldest child and daughter of William A. Lewis, 
to a cousin indicates by supposition that Shiloh was 
established out of a camp meeting held in 1775 or 
1776. This is the earliest dated indication that 
Shiloh existed prior to 1800. However, Methodist 
records show that the first camp meeting held in 
North Carolina was in Randolph County in 1801. The 
"Ector Letter" also relates furthur that according 
to Mrs. Ector's grandfather Andrew Lewis the first 
church building was built "about midway between 

Shiloh and Mr. Mat Walker's on the right hand side 

of the road leading from Mr. Walker's to Shiloh, 
slightly opposite Mr. Reid's to the left." There 



is sufficient information available to corroborate 
the location of the first church building as de- 
scribed in the "Ector Letter" (see The Land, Chapter 
Two). 

Other evidence supports the claims of pre-1800 
activity from a private collection of historical 
notes on Shiloh Church written in 1953 by Mrs. L. G. 
(Lydia) Matkins, Sr. Reference to a camp meeting 
in 1775 or 1776 was also made. Services and public 
school were conducted on Sundays in a small hut, 
according to Mrs. Matkins, and a few years later a 
church building was built to the South of what is now 
the Reid dairy farm on the East side of the main 
road. This location does not coincide with the 
Andrew Lewis description in the "Ector Letter" as 
to which side of the road the first church building 
site may have been, but a more detailed discussion in 
Chapter Two, The Land may clarify it. 

An Orange County deed dated December 22, 1814 
gives us the earliest recorded information about the 
formation of Shiloh Church. This deed (see Appendix 
A) records the sale of a one acre tract of land in 
Orange County (Alamance County formed out of Orange 
County in 1849) from Reverend William Matkins and 
William Busick, jointly, to a group of persons repre- 
senting a Methodist Episcopal Church as Trustees, for 



the purpose of erecting and building, or causing to 
be erected or built thereon a place of worship. The 
location of this one acre tract would place the 
first church building almost directly in the same 
spot upon which the Shiloh Church parsonage now 
sits. This also complements the church building 
location as described in the "Ector Letter" of 1933. 
Another piece of information, which is significant 
in accepting the 1814 date as plausible, is that 
the oldest dated tombrock in Shiloh' s cemetery is 
that of Isabel Matkins, wife of William Matkins, who 
died in 1816. 

We cannot continue at this point without rea- 
lizing the difficulty involved in determining exact- 
ly where the plot of land purchased in 1814 is locat- 
ed for certain. However, by plotting all the land 
owned by William Matkins in Orange County prior to 
the purchase date, which is adjacent to the land of 
William Busick (remember the joint sale), on an 
existing tax map of Alamance County we can indeed 
locate the property. A complete explanation with 
illustrated maps in Chapter Two, The Land will offer 
a more detailed discussion of this analysis, along 
with other problems which complicate this situation 
even furthur. 



THE SECOND BUILDING 

On November 7, 1836 Reverend William Matkins 
again granted to the Trustees of Shi 1 oh Church one 
acre of land on which to erect and build, or cause 
to be erected and built, a house or place of worship 
for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church. See 
Appendix B for an exact copy of this deed as it ap- 
pears in the Orange County Register of Deeds. This 
plot of land, upon which the second church building 
must have sat, was bounded by the original tract on 
the North, and the old Fayetteville Road (now N. C. 
Highway //87) on the East, and included the area of 
which the cemetery is now a part. The cemetery was 
established originally on this Matkin's property, so 
it seems logical that the Church would wish to buy 
it as a part of its own. At the modest price, even 
for those days, of $5.00 we can be certain that this 
sale as well as others may be more appropriately 
categorized as gifts. 

We have no means or records to qualify our guess 
of the type of structure these early houses of wor- 
ship might be, but it surely is safe to assume that 
in keeping with the construction practices of the 
day, they were most likely one or two room log or 
hand hewn structures. At some time, as the years 



passed, one of these early Churches could have been 
constructed of sawn lumber. A note from the minutes 
of the first Quarterly Conference of the Yanceyville 
Circuit, Hillsboro District on March 13, 1875 stated 
that "there are stoves in all our churches (except 
Shiloh, recently taken into the circuit)." This was 
Shiloh's first year in this circuit (see Chapter 
Seven, The Conference). Those winter Sundays must 
have drawn plenty of fire from the pulpit, for there 
was none in the furnace. 

THE THIRD BUILDING 

Almost sixty years would elapse before furthur 
mention of construction at Shiloh became recorded. 
Reverend James Rice, pastor of Shiloh from 1895-1897, 
reports in "The Methodist Church Papers: Historical 
Sketches of Circuits" that "we now have at this place 
(Shiloh Church) a large church building in process of 
construction." Rice's report is dated July 20, 1895. 
The purchase of . 8 acres of land in 1895 (see Chapter 
Two, The Land — The Lost Deed) provided the site upon 
which to erect this "large church building". The 1895 
structure provided the basis from which the present 
sanctuary was formed. It was constructed of plank 
siding and had a wood shingle roof. Without underpin- 




Painting by Mary S. Troxler 1980 

ILLUS. 1.1 Shiloh Church 1895 




Painting by Mary S. Troxler 1980 

ILLUS. 1.2 Shiloh Church 1936 



ning or insulation, the summers were very hot and 
the winters quite cold. Two wood stoves provided 
heat at the front. 

In 1980-81 Mary Simpson Troxler provided Shiloh 
Church with three oil-on-canvas paintings. The first 
was a representation of the 1895 church structure 
based upon eyewitness accounts by different church 
members who remembered it from years past (see Illus. 
1.1). The wooden steps at each door were later 
changed to concrete and these steps still lie beneath 
the present church in their original place. The 
date 1916 is painted on one of the foundation stones 
of the church front. Could this be the year when the 
steps were changed? The second painting of the church 
building represents the appearance of Shiloh following 
the 1936 renovations. The size, shape, and character 
of the structure again was based upon eyewitness 
accounts in addition to available pictures. Note 
the additional length in Illus. 1.2 due to added sanc- 
tuary and vestibule, and the added bell tower. Follow- 
ing the 1953 renovations and brick veneer, the church 
appeared as depicted in the third painting (see 
Illus. 1.3). In addition to the exterior changes 
the floor of the sanctuary was made to slope for 
better viewing. No furthur significant changes of 
the exterior appearance were made until the major 




Painting by Mary S. Troxler 1980 

ILLUS. 1.3 Shiloh Church 1953 



addition of 1980. The three paintings by Mrs. Troxler 
now hang in the fellowship hall which was part of the 
1980 addition. The face page of this book shows the 
church building as it appeared following the class- 
room addition of 1980 and as it exists at the present 
time. 

THE IMPROVEMENTS 
Several additions and improvements have been made 
during the years following the erection of the third 
church building, some which are summarized below: 

1915 Church building recovered with wooden shing- 
les at a cost of $116.00. 

1931 New communion set furnished 

1933 Church building recovered with tin roofing. 
Cemetery enlarged. Cemetery fence partially 
removed . 

1936 Two classrooms, belltower, and vestibule 
added for total cost of $1,400. Members 
donated materials and did much of the con- 
struction. Entire church painted. 

1949 Classrooms and basement enclosed, unfinished 
at rear of church for $1,200. New oil fired 



heating system installed Nov. 13, 1949 to 
replace the two cast iron wood stoves. 

1951-53 Main body of church was remodeled, redecor- 
ated, refurnished, and the classrooms brick 
veneered for $32,500. The Woman's Society of 
Christian Service donated pulpit furniture 
used today, and with the Willing Worker's 
Sunday School Class donated an electric organ 
first played Easter Sunday April 6, '53 by 
organist Mary Simpson Troxler. New pews 
were given by the Sunday School and indivi- 
duals. The old pews were moved to different 
classrooms where they are used today. Also 
at this time the altar picture of Christ 
praying in Gethsemane was placed by Mr. and 
Mrs. L. Gibbons Matkins in honor of their 
son, John Norris, who was lost in action dur- 
ing World War II over the Caribbean Sea. 

Remainder of sanctuary was brick veneered in 
1953. With the assistance of $3,000.00 from 
the Duke Endowment Fund, the entire $32,500 
debt was paid. 

1957 Early in the year a well was dug in order 
to provide water for the basement restrooms . 
A septic tank and waste system was also in- 
stalled. In preparation for the following 



10 



winter months a pumphouse was constructed 
for $705 and was completed on Dec. 21, 1957. 
This same year carpet was installed in the 
sanctuary. 

1973 Sanctuary and classrooms were air-condition- 
ed for $5,450. 

1977 June 5 Church road sign furnished by Metho- 
dist Men's Club and Memorial plaque 
with Apostle's Creed inscribed dedi- 
cated to memory of Cyrus Ervin Lewis . 

June 26 Pew cushions for sanctuary and 
classrooms installed for $1,935. 
Classrooms bought their own while 
sanctuary cushions were paid for 
by pledges. 

Dec. 4 Floodlights dedicated in memory of 
John and Or a Matkins. 

1980 Fellowship hall, four classrooms, restrooms, 
kitchen added at a total cost of $151,041. 
The Duke Endowment paid $38,550 and the re- 
mainder was paid through pledges and dona- 
tions. 

Building Committee: Rockie Troxler, chmn. 

Clarence Matkins 
Sam Lewis 



11 



Finance Committee: Emery Gilliam, chmn. 

Ervie Lewis 

Wes Gilliam 

Joe Matkins 

Jerry Matkins 

Decorators: Karon Matkins, chwmn. 

II a Terrell 

Marie Peeples 

Advisors: Ralph Somers 

Howard Troxler 



Dec. 16, 1979 Groundbreaking Ceremony 
Rev. Barney Davidson, Dist. Supt. 
P^ev. Charles Hackett Pastor 
Rev. S. J. Starnes, former Pastor 

June 29, 1980 Consecration Ceremony 
Rev. Barney Davidson, Dist. Supt. 
Rev. Charles Hackett Pastor 

Aug. 23, 1981 Dedication Ceremony 
Rev. Barney Davidson, Dist. Supt. 
Rev. Randy L. Wall Pastor 
Rev. S. J. Starnes, former Pastor 

Presentation of Building Rockie Troxler 
Destroying of Note Emery Gilliam 

Karon Matkins 
Words of Dedication Rev. Randy Wall 
Prayer of Dedication Rev. S.J. Starnes 
Benediction Rev. B. Davidson 



A piano was donated to the church for use in 
the sanctuary by Leta Matkins in loving memo- 
ry of her husband Mr. Worth Matkins. The 
other piano was moved into the new fellow- 
ship hall. 

12 



1982 May 30 Needlepoint cushions dedicated — 

sixteen altar rail kneeling pads depicting 
various Christian symbols and symbols of 
the Apostles (see Illus. 1.4). Financed by 
church members , made by Methodist Women, co- 
ordinated by Anderrena Lewis and II a Terrell. 

Pastor Rev. Randy Wall 

Presentation Mary Troxler 

Acceptance Marie Peeples 

Prayer of Dedication Alvin Herb in 

1983 Feb. 13. .. .Dedication of memorial gifts for 

S.J. Starnes of new candlelighters, refinish- 

ed baptismal bowl , refinished offering plates. 

Pastor Rev. Randy Wall 

Presentation of Gifts Alvin Herbin 

Acceptance Marie Peeples 

Prayer of Dedication Rockie Troxler 

Sept. 11 Dedication of new choir robes fur- 
nished by Margaret S. Barber in loving mem- 
ory of husband and former choir member Vernon 
J. Barber 

Address to congregation Rev. R. Wall 
Response of the choir Mary Troxler 
Prayer of Dedication Alvin Herbin 

1984 Feb. 19 Presentation of Lecy Kernodle be- 
quest of $33,319 to Shiloh Cemetery Fund. 

Presentation of Gift Emery Gilliam 
Receiving of Gift Clarence Matkins 
Prayer of Acceptance Alvin Herbin 



13 




Photo courtesy of Clarence C. Matkins 



Shiloh Church Pulpit 1942 




Photo courtesy of Karen Lewis 

ILLUS. 1.4 Shiloh Church Pulpit 1983 



14 



OTHER BUILDING APPURTENANCES 

Mr. Alton P. Lewis shares with us in his memoirs 
that in the past when reunions, or conventions met and 
dinner was held on the church grounds that each family 
or a group of families would eat from a table cloth 
spread on the ground. In 1939 Mr. John Matkins built 
a picnic shelter and table so that the dinner could 
be spread out and everyone share each other's meals. 
A few years later a concrete table was constructed by 
Mr. Banks Tr oxl er. This facility (II lus. 1.5) is still 
used today, when weather permits , for outdoor picnics. 

In 1959 under the supervision of Scoutmaster 
Howard Troxler and Assistant Scoutmaster Sam Lewis 
a 20' x 40' wood frame structure with a concrete floor 
and large fireplace was built just west of the ceme- 
tery. This building was erected for the purpose of 
providing quarters for the Boy Scout Troop //142 which 
Shiloh sponsored. Appropriately dubbed as the "Scout 
Hut", for which it was built, this building (Illus. 
1.6) still serves as a meeting place for the Youth 
Fellowship, Sunday School classes, parties, and diff- 
erent other church functions. 

On April 19, 1963 Ida Walker, George Everett 
Walker, Kate Susan Walker, Boyd Walker, and Pauline 



15 




Photo courtesy of Karen Lewis 

ILLUS. 1.5 Shiloh Church Picnic Tables 




*w .*"'*.#••»•» 



Photo courtesy of Karen Lewis 

ILLUS. 1.6 Shiloh Church Scout Hut 



16 



Walker deeded to the Trustees of Shiloh Methodist 
Church a parcel of land containing 2.71 acres (see 
Appendix F). This plot of land was bounded by the 
cemetery on the South, and the Reidsville Highway 
(N. C. Hwy. #87) on the East, and included again the 
original tract of land which was granted to the Church 
by William Matkins and William Busick in 1814. An 
explanation in detail of this transaction is given 
in Chapter Two, The Land. Later in 1963 on this plot, 
construction was begun on a new parsonage for Shiloh. 
Prior to this date Shiloh shared a parsonage 
with the other members on the Burlington Circuit — 
Camp Springs, Mt. Vernon, New Salem, and Bethel. The 
parsonage for these Burlington Circuit Churches is 
believed to have been built at the same time as New 
Salem Church, which stood adjacent to it. Reverend 
Samuel F. Nicks, pastor of the Burlington Circuit 
from 1903-1907, was instrumental in the founding of 
New Salem and is thought to have been the first pastor 
to reside in the new parsonage. This former residence 
for pastors is now owned and occupied by members of 
Shiloh, Mr. and Mrs. L.Paul Troxler (see Illus. 1.7). 
When Shiloh became a station church in 1960 under 
Reverend Roger E. Thompson, a small house on Stony 
Creek Church Road about one-half mile from N. C. Hwy. 
//87 was leased from Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Workman, and 



17 




Photo courtesy of Karen Lewis 

ILLUS. 1.7 Burlington Circuit Parsonage 1903-1960 




Photo courtesy of Karen Lewis 

ILLUS. 1.8 Shiloh Church Parsonage 1960-1963 



18 



served as Shiloh's Parsonage (see Illus. 1.8) until 
the new parsonage was constructed in 1963-64. The 
only pastors to occupy the leased home were Rev. 
Roger E. Thompson, Rev. Charles C. Clark, and Rev. 
W. F. Wright, Jr. during the years between 1961-64. 

Reverend W. F. (Buddy) Wright, Jr. became the 
first pastor to reside in the present parsonage (see 
Illus. 1.9), which was completed early in 1964. The 
parsonage contains 1 , 500 square feet with three 
bedrooms, 1-J baths, a den, living room, study, and 
kitchen, plus a carport and spacious basement. The 
building contract totalled $18,300 with the addition- 
al funding of $713.30 for grounds, $1,930.92 for dec- 
orating, $55.00 for Plans and Specifications, and 
$44 . 50 for the Finance Committee total 1 ing $21 , 043 . 72 . 
Bank financing plus individual donations ranging from 
$1 — $3,000 from forty-three families provided for a 
full payment of $22,382.89 on Nov. 23, 1971. Three 
businesses also donated money, and memorials were 
given in memory of Ray Peeples, J. P. Workman, and 
Talmadge Gerringer by their respective families. The 
following persons were responsible for the parsonage 
construction: 

Building Committee Edgar Peeples, chmn. 

Grounds Committee Ervin Lewis, Willie Re id 

Decorating Committee Mary S. Troxler, chwmn. 



19 



Finance Committee 



Paul Troxler 
Everette Lewis 
Norman Herb in 
Frank Matkins 



chmn. 



Treasurers 



Marie Peeples,Ervin Lewis 




Photo courtesy of Karen Lewis 

ILLUS. 1.9 Shiloh Church Parsonage 1963-1984 



20 



2 
The Land 

SHILOH'S BEGINNING 

Land ownership around any community changes as 
the years progress and individuals and their families 
move in or move out, or as they sell or transfer 
their ownership to others, or as they pass on leav- 
ing their estates to family or friends. However, 
"permanent" institutions usually accumulate and sus- 
tain ownership of property for longer periods of time. 
Such is the case of Shiloh Church which, from its 
original land purchase, has only added to, not taken 
from its accumulation of landed property. Recorded 
deeds provide us with an abundance of information in 
addition to the standard land description. Adjoining 
property owners are sometimes noted as well as natu- 
ral boundaries such as roads, creeks and rivers, and 
county borders. For churches and other like institu- 
tions the grantee may be a group of trustees, whose 
names identify the institution as well as its active 
members. Since the grantor is also identified, trac- 
ing the exact location of the tract may be simplified. 

Every deed is required to have aland description 
which identifies the location of the property as well 

as its size and shape. Although it is beyond the 



21 



scope of this publication to instruct the reader on 
how to reconstruct property lines, it is worthwhile 
to note that the information contained in a deed is 
quite helpful , if not essential , in determining 
much of the information which we seek about our past. 
Often the adjoining property owners are identified. 
Using this knowledge, coupled with the name of the 
grantor , we are able to draw our own maps of a parti- 
cular area for a particular period of time. As we 
accumulate the deeds for successive years, we then 
can construct a map of the total property as it now 
exists. 

Property ownership in the 1800' s usually con- 
sisted of large tracts of land, especially in rural 
areas. Land grants from the State of N.C. were 
still common during the early part of that century, 
and were available at ridiculously low prices. One of 
the predominant landowners of these days was P^everend 
William Matkins. By 1827 he had accumulated more 
than 746 acres of real property (Map 2.1). William 
Busick, also a large landowner, joined with Reverend 
Matkins in 1814 to sell a one acre plot, located be- 
tween the two of them, to the trustees of a Methodist 
Episcopal Church for the purpose of erecting their 
church thereon. The trustees named in that original 
deed of 1814 (see Appendix A) were William Brannock, 
John Matkins , Ben j amin Fielder, Thomas Garret, Thomas 



22 




23 



Thompson, Henry Thompson, Thomas Dilworth, William 
Williams, and Roger Simpson. The names of Thomas 
Thompson and William Matkins also appeared as Trus- 
tees in the organization of Camp Springs Methodist 
Episcopal Church of Caswell County on June 30, 1809. 
Whatever the reason for change, their interests 
apparently lay in Orange County and they, along with 
the other gentlemen aforementioned became the found- 
ing fathers of Shiloh. The names Brannock and Mat- 
kins are still commonplace among the membership of 
Shiloh today (see Chapter Three, The Church). 

Another interesting point is noteworthy at 
this time. Apparently a tradition of the times 
allowed non-members of a particular church to serve 
as trustees for that church. This is evident in a 
transaction for which James Daniel ly of Orange County 
deeded to Bethel Methodist Church one acre of land 
on January 26, 1849. Among the trustees named in 
this deed were Andrew Lewis and Samuel P. Foster, 
known members and staunch supporters of Shiloh. It 
is this type of anomaly which creates problems for 
determining the facts necessary to make a history 
treatise such as this authentic. 

The Busick-Matkins transfer of land was located 
at the spot upon which now stands the Shiloh Parson- 
age and was described as ten poles (165 ft.) by 
sixteen poles (264 ft.) in size, which is exactly 



24 



one acre. The land description of the deed does 
not locate the property by way of landmarks, boun- 
daries, or neighboring landowners. This lack of 
information greatly complicates the task of pin- 
pointing the location. However, by compiling the 
few, subtle clues that are available we can do just 
that. First, we were situated in Orange County prior 
to 1814. Second, the land in question was in an area 
adjacent to both William Matkins and William Busick. 
Access to such an area, like a main road, was also 
important. We might mistake this deed for that of 
another Methodist Episcopal Church were it not for 
the identification of Orange County. In addition, 
the common property line between Busick and Matkins 
is clearly defined by property deeds which they held 
in 1814 or laid claim to and appear in Orange County 
Register of Deeds Office in Hillsboro, N.C. The fact 
that a main road dissects their common property line 
gives credence to our proposed location. Furthurmore, 
the present cemetery of Shiloh Church is directly 
south of and adjacent to this one acre tract, in 
which is buried William Matkin's first wife, Isabel, 
who died in 1816 only two years after the land pur- 
chase. Incidentally, this location coincides exactly 
with the described location of the first church of the 
"Ector Letter" (see Chapter One, The Buildings). Map 
2.2 locates the first land ownership of Shiloh Church 
and identifies other points of interest. 



25 



Property of 
William Matkins 




Property of 
William Busick 



Matki 



This map is not the result of an actual survey, 
but is a composite of data extracted from ac- 
tual deeds and land descriptions Its use Is for 
historical and general reference only. 

RDT 



MAP 2.2 Shiloh Church Property 1814 



26 



ADDING ON 

On Nov. 7, 1836 a second transaction took place 
by which the Reverend William Matkins granted by deed 
a one acre tract (see Appendix B) , more or less, to 
the following trustees of a Methodist Episcopal 
Church: Alexander Brannock, William Foster, George 
Harbin (old style spelling) , George Foster, Noah Mat- 
kins, John Bouldin, Samuel Foster, John Foster, and 
David Thomas. The only information which locates 
this parcel of land is the reference to Orange County 
and the mention that one boundary lies on and follows 
a road. In order to furthur identify and validate 
the location of this tract we must look to a property 
deed of Dec. 31, 1846 whereby William Matkins conveyed 
to John Kernodle a 76 acre portion of his land. By 
the land description of that deed, the site and pro- 
perty of Shiloh Methodist Church is clearly identi- 
fied. A deed to Andrew Lewis from Jos iah Kernodle (son 
of John Kernodle) in 1860 furthur notes this same 
site. Since no property was added to Shiloh, according 
to the deed records, between 1836 and 1846, and the 
property identified in the 1846 deed to John Kernodle 
traces approximately two acres of land as that belong- 
ing to the church, then we can assume that this area 
is the two acres purchased in 1814 and 1836. Map 2.3 



27 



Property of 
William Busick 



Property of 
William Matkins/ 




I Present site of I 
l_Shiloh ChurchJ 



This map is not the result of an actual survey, 
but Is a composite of data extracted from ac- 
tual deeds and land descriptions. Its use is for 
historical and general reference only. 



MAP 2.3 Shiloh Church Property 1836 



shows ' the Shiloh property of 1836 as described in 
the deeds of 1814 and 1836 along with other land- 
marks and adjacent property owners. As indicated, 
the 1836 plot lies south and adjacent to the 1814 
one-acre plot and is bounded on the East by the 
Fayetteville Road (now N. C. Hwy. #87). This second 
land purchase was located north of the present church 
building, and included a portion of the North-side 
parking lot and the South end of the present ceme- 
tery. The second church building as described in 
Chapter One, The Buildings would have stood on this 
portion of land. 

THE LOST DEED 

Furthur addition to Shiloh' s property was made 
by a deed dated Nov. 21, 1895 from Alexander A. Walker, 
X.N.W. Garrison, and George W. Lewis to the trustees 
of Shiloh Church. Unfortunately, the deed was lost 
without having been legally recorded. Therefore, a 
land description is not available to assist in locat- 
ing this parcel of land. In order to legalize the 
transaction, a quit claim deed was issued on Dec. 3, 
1895 and is shown by replica in Appendix C. To aid 
in establishing boundaries for and locating this 
"lost" tract of land, we can use the 1984 (present) 



29 



tax map which lists all of Shiloh Church's property. 
By tracing all of the known properties onto the 1984 
tax map, year by year, we find a small area of ap- 
proximately 0.8 acres which is not accounted for. 
This "lost" area happens to be the very spot upon 
which our present church building stands , so this 
would have to be the land deeded in 1895. Map 2.5 
of the present Shiloh Church properties details this 
area very clearly. Map 2.4 shows the Shiloh property 
as it existed in 1895. 

Two discrepancies which are evident, after close 
analysis, of the quit claim deed of 1895 remain unex- 
plained. The fact that Alexander Walker was listed 
as one of the grantors is strange in that the only 
property which he could lay claim to, actually came 
to him through his wife Susan Jordan Walker . However , 
the land was divided equally among their two sons, 
and a son by her first marriage, and a son of her 
previous husband's (George Jordan) first marriage. 
Therefore, Alexander Walker never legally owned any 
property in that vicinity by record. Even more con- 
spicuous is the second discrepancy that is stated in 
the quit claim deed itself. The conveyed property 
is noted to be bounded on the East by I.N.W. Garrison, 
which was factual ; on the South and West by George 
W. Lewis, which is also true; and on the North by 



30 



Property of 
George Jordan heirs 



Jord c 



Lewis 



Property of 
George W. Lewis 



This map Is not the result ol an actual survey, 
but Is a composite of data extracted from ac- 
tual deeds and land descriptions. Its use Is for 
historical and general reference only. 

ROT 



Property of 
J. N. Reid 




Property of 
I N W. Garrison 



MAP 2.4 Shiloh Church Property 1895 



31 



A. Walker. However, the property on the North side 
belonged to Shiloh Church, and furthurmore , no com- 
mon boundary ever existed between all three parties. 
Due to the involvement of Alexander Walker in the 
business of the church, it may be that he represented 
Shiloh Church in the quit claim deed of 1895, but 
this is not indicated to be the case in the records. 

MODIFICATIONS 

To furthur enhance the pic tor al site of Shiloh 
Church a small portion of land directly west and 
south of the existing property was purchased from 
the Kernodle family. The deed of Feb. 25, 1915 
(see Appendix D) notes a purchase price of $64.50 
for 1.29 acres. The "scout hut", picnic shelter, 
and pump house of present day were built on portions 
of this land of 1915. A glance at Map 2.1 indicates 
that this portion of this land belonged to the ini- 
tial purchase of land that Rev. William Matkins made 
in 1802. 

One of the most important identifying landmarks 
of the early deeds of land which surrounded the Shi- 
loh Community was "The Great Road", or "The Fayette- 
ville Road" as it was called. Being an early means 
of travel, this road, like others, meandered consid- 
erably, seeking the path of least resistance. As it 



32 



wound around large rock outer oppings and trees, it 
also formed a natural boundary for many property 
lines. Although "The Great Road" served as a major 
means of travel , it was constructed of natural earth 
which compacted from use, but still formed ruts and 
holes during the wet seasons. As the North Carolina 
road systems improved, "The Fayetteville Road" was 
numbered as N.C. Hwy. //54. Local residents note that 
the road in front of Shiloh was hard surfaced in 
1930, and a road survey of the N. C. Department of 
Transportation concurs with that date. W.N. Reid, 
a Shiloh Church member, helped haul rock for the road 
bed construction. In order to provide safer travel , 
the winding road of the past was straightened, causing 
it to be moved away from the church to its present 
location. Since the old property lines in front of 
the church followed the road, Shiloh' s new "front 
yard" was owned by the W. L. Gilliam family. On 
January 16, 1943 W. L. (Bill) and wife Lora Gilliam 
deeded to Shiloh Methodist Church and its trustees 
this portion of land bounded on the East by the new 
road (listed as N. C. Hwy. 87 at this time), on the 
South by the Kernodles and on the North by J.N. Reid. 
The West boundary was the old road bed, now a part of 
Shiloh' s front yard. This parcel of land was approx- 
imately 0.8 acres and is depicted on Map 2.5. A copy 



33 



Property of 
Frank Matkins 



Property of 
Willie Reid 




This map is not the result of an actual survey, 
but is a composite ot data extracted from ac- 
tual deeds and land descriptions Its use Is lor 
historical and general relerence only. 

BDT 



MAP 2.5 Shiloh Church Property 1984 



%l 



of the deed from W. L. Gilliam of 1943 appears in 
Appendix E. 

LOST PROPERTY RETURNS 

When Shiloh became a station church in 1960 
under the pastorate of Reverend Roger Thompson, the 
need arose for a parsonage that Shiloh could call its 
own. Heretofore, the churches on the same circuit 
had shared in parsonage expenses and usage. On April 
19, 1963 the children and heirs of Madison B. Walker 
sold to Shiloh Church and its trustees a tract of 
land approximately 2.71 acres in size upon which to 
build the parsonage which we enjoy today. See Appen- 
dix F for a copy of the deed for this property. 

For those who have followed closely the land 
transactions of this chapter, it will be evident 
that this latest purchase offers an apparent contra- 
diction. As mentioned at the start of this Chapter 
on Shiloh' s Beginning, the original land conveyance 
of 1814 was also traced to include the spot upon 
which the parsonage now stands. There are no records 
available to show that the original tract of 1814 
was transferred. In fact, as mentioned earlier, an 
Andrew Lewis deed shows the Shiloh property of 1814 
to be still intact as late as 1860. The continuous 
property line of the West border of Shiloh' s 1814 



35 



and 1836 additions was noted to be 7.55 chains 
(498.3 feet). The additional property of 1895 
upon which the present church was built should have 
added to that continuous property 1 ine of 7.55 chains, 
but inspection of the 1915 deed from the Kernodle 
family to Shiloh reveals that the continuous West 
boundary remained at 7.55 chains. Therefore, the 
property of 1814, north of the cemetery, for some 
reason was "given up" between 1860 and 1915. Only a 
close investigation of the M. B. Walker property 
adjacent to and north of Shiloh provides us with an 
answer . 

As a result of the division of lands from 
George Jordan and wife Susan Jordan (Walker), M. B. 
Walker received a portion of this land in 1901. A 
traverse of this plot as described in the 1901 deed 
shows a small "peninsula" which is ad j acent to Shiloh 
Church ' s property and is noted to be 4.0 chains wide . 
A continuation of the Jordan property settlement was 
finalized in 1909, but a deed on this date of the 
same area notes that the previous "peninsula" which 
adjoined Shiloh was 6.25 chains wide. This small 
addition to the Walker property of 2.25 chains, or 
9 poles, was the exact spot of the original plot of 
1814 which measured 16 poles by 10 poles. Through 
the years, this small acre of land must have been 



36 



forgotten and a survey in 1909 simply absorbed this 
165 ft. long strip into the Walker property. Map 2.5 
locates this original tract. 

The M. B. (Mat) Walker family have been loyal 
supporters for many years of Shiloh Church and con- 
tributed greatly to its purpose. It is only fitting 
that they would return this original parcel , with 
more, perhaps not aware of its significance to 
Shiloh' s historic past. One furthur interesting 
piece of information also helps to explain the unac- 
countable acre of the Walker prpperty. In 1963 when 
the survey of the property was made, it was found 
that the Walker boundary line traversed a part of the 
cemetery. So although the sale included 2.71 acres 
of land, the $1,500 per acre cost was applied only 
to 1.54 acres for a total of $2,130 leaving slightly 
more than one acre of land as an unaccountable por- 
tion of the total deeded from the Walker's. Perhaps 
these circumstances provide us with the final clue 
necessary to validate the land purchase of 1814??? 



37 



3 
The Church 



In recording the remnants of Shiloh's past, 
the search includes different elements of interest; 
such as property acquisition, building sites, church 
buildings, and other important facets of involvement. 
Perhaps the most important, however, is the Church 
itself, or more correctly the Church people. In 
the early years, through the years, and even today, 
the Church is formed by the people and for the people, 
that they may equip themselves for the responsibility 
and joy of serving Him, the giver and procreator of 
life and the Church. All other organizations whether 
civic, professional , school , or institutional, screen, 
limit, and restrict their membership. The Church 
accepts all of God's people. 

Shiloh Church, like many others, has grown and 
developed through the years as a result of the dedi- 
cation and hard work of many different individuals. 
Though not included in these pages, whether through 
neglect or lack of information, these individuals will 
not be excluded from the true Book of Life. Where 
possible, however, the remainder of this chapter is 
devoted to the task of recognizing those persons who 
have served Shiloh Methodist Church. 



38 



THE FORMATIVE YEARS 

Our first opportunity at a glimpse of early 
members at Shiloh comes with the study of the first 
known and recorded deed from the year 1814 (see 
Appendix A). Although Shiloh' s formation may have 
pre-dated this time, no prior records are known which 
reveal the names of its membership. The names of 
William Brannock, John Matkins, Benjamin Fielder, 
Thomas Garret, Thomas Thompson, Henry Thompson, 
Thomas Dilworth, William Williams, and Roger Simpson 
appear on the 1814 deed as trustees, and we may 
assume that these men along with their families, as 
well as others, were members at that time. 

With the limit of space, as well as intent, a 
full genealogical study of each of the families from 
our early past is not practical. However, due to 
their active involvement and other considerations, 
some of these individual s are given added recognition. 
Reference to the Shiloh Church Membership Roll on 
pages 55-80 may be of help to the family researcher. 
The names of Matkins and Brannock are of special 
interest to us inasmuch as direct descendants of 
the John Matkins and William Brannock of the 1814 
trustees are faithful members of Shiloh Church today. 
The annual Brannock-Faucette reunion represents a 
perpetuation of this ardent support begun so many 
years ago. 



39 



The next document of record which identifies 
the Church membership is the deed of 1836 (see 
Appendix B) . Trustees of the Church named in this 
deed are Alexander Brannock, William Foster, George 
Harbin ( Herb in ), George Foster, Noah Matkins, John 
Bouldin, Samuel Foster, John Foster, and David 
Thomas. In addition to Brannock and Matkins the 
names of Herbin and Bouldin stand out in this list 
of trustees from 1836 as names which remain familiar 
with us today. Also outstanding are the names of 
four Fosters out of the nine trustees, indicating 
great dependency upon this family during Shiloh's 
infancy. George Foster is recognized on his tomb- 
stone in the Church cemetery (see Chapter Eight, The 
Cemetery) as a veteran of the Revolutionary War. 
His son, Sam P. Foster, also a trustee in 1836, is 
buried in Shiloh's cemetery as well. William Foster 
was appointed District Steward on March 23, 1850 at 
the first Quarterly Conference of the Franklinsville 
Circuit in the Raleigh District, which was held at 
Shiloh. William served in this district capacity 
until at least 1854 when Shiloh moved from the 
Franklinsville Circuit to the newly formed Alamance 
Circuit of the Greensboro District. He apparently 
was Treasurer at Shiloh in 1836, for the earliest re- 
corded tithe to Shiloh Church is attested by way of 



40 



a receipt to William Herb in for $5.00 to the "Shilow 
Meetinghouse" and signed by William Foster. The name 
Foster has been prominent in the Shiloh Church com- 
munity for many years. 

At this time it is appropriate to focus attention 
upon one of the most prominent of the founding fathers, 
if not The Founding Father of Shiloh Methodist Church — 
William Matkins. As co-grantor of the original land 
of 1814 and grantor of the second tract of 1836, he 
stands as a dominant force in the formation of Shiloh. 
To him we dedicate a special paragraph outlining his 
activities and importance to our beginning. 

WILLIAM MATKINS 

William Matkins was born in Dorchester County, 
Maryland on October 15, 1777. He migrated to Orange 
County, N. C. just prior to 1790. On February 27, 
1797 he married Isabel Elizabeth Busick, daughter of 
Caleb Busick. From this marriage came seven child- 
ren; Isaac, John, Elizabeth, Margaret, Sarah, William 
King, and Noah. The eldest six children moved 
to Green Castle, Indiana around 1840. Noah, the 
youngest child, was listed as trustee of Shiloh Church 
in the deed of 1836, but on September 23, 1852 moved 
west. Matkins' first wife, Isabel Elizabeth, died 
July 30, 1816 and her tombrock is the oldest dated 
interment in Shiloh' s cemetery. On October 25, 1817 



41 



William Matkins remarried to Elizabeth Moore. This 
marriage produced eight children; Thomas, Andrew, 
Isabella, Dennis, Elinor, David, Dinah, and Martha J. 
Elizabeth died March 13, 1841 and is also buried at 
Shiloh. 

In 1802 Matkins bought his first property of 
24 acres from the State of North Carolina. However, 
he is noted in another deed transaction of an adjoin- 
ing tract of land as being the owner of this 1802 
deeded area prior to 1798. Most likely he laid his 
claim to it when he moved to the area or shortly 
thereafter, then legalized his claim by deed in 1802. 
Gradually he added to this tract until in 1827 he 
owned a total of 745 acres. Map 2.1 depicts this 
total area and the dates of acquisition. In 1814 
William Matkins and William Busick joined to grant 
Shiloh Methodist Church its first tract of land upon 
which to build and erect a house of worship. Matkins 
also gave another acre of his lands to Shiloh in 1836. 

Camp Springs Methodist Church in Caswell County, 
N. C. records in its history that on June 30, 1809 
William Matkins, along with others, served as trustee. 
Also on record is that Matkins became a local preacher 
and later a charter member of Shiloh. Some question 
arises in the actual role that he played as a preach- 
er. In Shiloh' s deed of 1814 his identify is described 
as a Doctor of Divinity (interjected as an editing 



42 



correction) and also as Reverend Matkins. On his 
tombrock in Shiloh's cemetery "Reverend" is also 
used as a title to his name. With these references, 
we may be certain that Matkins was indeed inspired 
to lead others and probably served Shiloh for 40 
years as a local preacher during the absence of the 
circuit rider (see Chapter Six, The Pastors). The 
Methodist Church has no record of Matkins as an or- 
dained minister but the Quarterly Conference Minutes 
of the Franklinsville Circuit from 1849 to 1854 rec- 
ognize him as a Lay Elder or Local Preacher, having 
passed his annual examination of character each year. 
Shiloh Church belonged to the Franklinsville Circuit 
of the Greensboro and Raleigh Districts from 1849 un- 
til 1854 (see Chapter Seven, The Conference). 

William Matkins was buried at Shiloh Methodist 
Church and his tombrock indicates his death occurred 
on May 5, 1849. However, he was listed on August 29, 
1850 in the Federal Census as a 72 year old farmer 
living with his children Isabella, Ellen, David, and 
Martha in Alamance County. Sons Thomas and Noah and 
their families also were listed. No Matkins 1 were 
listed in the Morton Township area in the 1860 census. 
There are no direct descendants now known to still 
reside in the Shiloh community. As indicated earlier, 
William Matkins represented Shiloh Church on the Con- 
ference level as late as September 1854. This record, 



43 



along with his will, which was probated in the June 
term of 1859 makes it more likely that he died in May 
of 1859, rather than 1849 as his tombrock indicates. 
In addition, a personal diary of Thomas Moore, Jr. 
states that "William Matkins, preacher of the gospel, 
died May the 3rd, 1859." 

COMMUNITY LEADERS AND WORSHIP 

Many other individuals contributed to the pro- 
gress of Shiloh Church and its surrounding community 
after William Matkins and the early pioneers had 
paved the way. One such prominent individual was 
Andrew Lewis, who moved into the Shiloh area from 
Rockingham County in the middle 1840' s. Andy bought 
his first property in Orange County (later Alamance) 
in 1846 from George Foster and built his home about 
a mile to the West of Shiloh Church. The road which 
ran by his home was called Lewis Lane until recently. 
By 1860 Andy had accumulated 565 acres of land extend- 
ing from Shiloh Church into Guilford County to the 
Haw River (see Map 3.1). In the 1850 Federal Census 
Andy Lewis was listed as a farmer living with his 
wife Margaret and eight children in Alamance County. 

From 1850 until as late as 1854 Lewis repre- 
sented Shiloh Church as Class Leader at the Quarterly 
Conference meetings of the Franklinsville Circuit in 
the Greensboro and Raleigh Districts. A lack of 



44 




This map is not the result ot an actual survey, 
but is a composite ot data extracted Irom ac 
*ual deeds and land descriptions. Its use Is for 
historical and general reference only. 

RDT 



MAP 3.1 Andrew Lewis Property 1 860 



45 



records doesn't permit a full dossier on Andy's 
activities within Shiloh, but his importance and 
contribution to our Church during these early grow- 
ing years cannot be overlooked nor forgotten. All 
of the Lewis family at Shiloh today are direct de- 
scendant's of Andrew, and many of his family, as 
well as Andrew himself, lie buried in the Church 
cemetery. In 1923 the first Lewis Family Reunion 
was held at Shiloh Church in honor and recognition 
of Andrew, and has continued annually until the pre- 
sent day to meet on the third Sunday of July. 

The regular worship service at Shiloh has been 
held at different times through the years as the 
Pastor's scheduling permitted. During the earliest 
years, the "circuit riders" who served as pastor 
could only be present at intermittent intervals. 
With a local preacher, such as William Matkins, 
Shiloh could probably hold services each Sunday on 
a regular basis. As travel improved and the circuit 
grew smaller and the Churches closer together, wor- 
ship services were held by the Methodist preacher 
every two weeks alternating from morning to after- 
noon. When church convened in the morning, Sunday 
School was held in the morning one hour earlier; 
likewise, when church services were in the afternoon, 
Sunday School met in the afternoon one hour earlier. 



46 



Normally Church services were held at 11:00 A. M. 
or 3:00 P. M. More recently the time was changed 
to 10:00 A.M. and 11:00 A.M. with preaching and Sun- 
day School alternating. During some years Church 
services were held only one Sunday per month. When 
Shiloh became a station church in 1960 and had its 
own pastor , worship service was changed to 11:00 A.M. 
on each Sunday, as it remains today. 

One of the community conveniences which served 
the Shiloh area prior to 1900 was Morton's Store, a 
general merchandise store located just off the Fayette- 
ville Road (now N.C. Hwy. #87) near Gilliams Church 
on High Rock Road (now Gilliams Church Road). B. F. 
Morton operated the store as early as 1848 and it 
was a hub of activity until the turn of the century. 
A receipt to William Herb in for $1.50 for a pair of 
shoes was signed by B. F. Morton on June 17, 1848. 
Later the store was moved down the High Rock Road 
to the intersection of Bethlehem Church Road where it 
became known as the "Votin' Place". Morton's Store 
also served as Post Office for the northern section 
of Alamance County and this area was named and is 
still called Morton Township. Morton kept a journal 
of his transactions and it is through one of these 
journals that we, the historians of Shiloh, are bene- 
fitted indirectly. Although the journal was recorded 



47 



in 1880, it apparently was used from 1884 to 1886 
to keep church records, which were written in the 
blank pages and borders of the journal. Several 
notes of great interest are incorporated into the 
Morton Journal , the most notable being the minutes 
concerning the founding of the Sunday School at 
Shi 1 oh Church (see Chapter Four, The Sunday School). 
Among other items, was the amounts assessed the 
members of Shiloh Church sometime around 1884. This 
then is the earliest known membership list of Shiloh 
Church and the assessments made to the respective 
heads of household and single adult members. 



G. E. Jordan 


2.00 


G. W. Lewis 


0.50 


H. L. Faucet te 


1.50 


J. W. Underwood 


1.36 


P. F. Faucette 


2.00 


J. M. Underwood 


1.55 


Jane Faucette 


0.25 


W. H. Matkins 


0.50 


Katie B. Faucette 


0.50 


Joe Matkins 


1.00 


Bet tie M. Faucette 


0.50 


A. M. Lewis 


2.20 


J. M. Jordan 


1.25 


J. W. Faucette 


2.50 


Win Lewis 


4.00 


Bettie J. Phibbs 


1.00 


S. A. Lewis 


3.00 


Rosa Brannock 


2.00 


F. L. Herbin 


1.00 


J. P. Boone 


3.00 


Sal lie Vinant 


0.25 


A. Walker 


3.50 


Elizabeth Coleman 


0.25 


Rachel Ingold 


1.00 


J. H. Coleman 


0.25 


Margaret Simpson 


1.00 


J. T. Coleman 


0.50 







Many personal letters are transcribed in Mor- 
ton' s Journal, and one such letter on October 9, 
1886 was written probably by James M. Jordan or his 



48 



brother G. E. Jordan to a cousin. In his letter he 
relates how several in the area have died of malaria. 
"Old uncle Andy Lewis (84) has gotten better. He is 
about as well as usual , able to sit up in the corner." 
He continues, "We had a good protracted (drawn out) 
meeting at Shil oh, commenced the 5th Sunday in August . 
Several professed. Among the number that professed 
were old man Richard Maynard and two of his children." 
The letter ends abruptly with "Alexander said to tell 
you that times were the hardest here they have been 
since the Revolutionary War." 

Although many sad moments have occurred through 
the years for those whose loved ones have passed on, 
one of the most touching was that of Frank B. Lewis, 
son of Mr . and Mrs . Samuel Lewis , who died on February 
9, 1902 at the tender age of 25. In remembrance of 
Frank a letter of resolve was placed in the Sunday 
School Record and sent to the Raleigh Christian Advo- 
cate. A committee composed of T. J. Gwynn, J. W. 
Faucette, and J. M. Jordan resolved "that in the 
death of Frank, we have sustained the loss of a most 
estimable young man, the Sunday School one of its 
brightest jewels, and most faithful members. May his 
zealous Christian character lead us as successfully 
as he was led." Men and women like Frank Lewis have 
through the years served unitedly to make Shil oh 



49 



United Methodist Church a place in which its members 
might seek to better serve their Lord. 

A 1921 assessment of the members of Shi 1 oh 
Church of the Burlington Circuit was directed by the 
Reverend Dwight A. Petty. Recognized as stewards 
were J. M. Jordan, L. G. Matkins, C. L. Lewis, John 
C. Matkins, and Mrs. Lelia Watlington, assn't. The 
trustees of Shiloh at that time were M. B. Walker, 
W. R. Lewis, and W. A. Lewis. Also noted were T. J. 
Gwyn, charge Lay Leader; John C. Matkins, Centenary 
Treasurer; C. L. Lev/is, Sunday School Superintendent. 
Assessments were made in order to provide for sala- 
ries of the pastor and the Presiding Elder (District 
Supt.) as well as the Missionary Centenary, the Con- 
ference's mission control body. Conference collec- 
tions and education subscriptions were arranged by 
other means. 

Sometime around 1930 Shiloh decided to hold on 
the first Sunday of June a homecoming for members who 
had moved away or changed church locations. After the 
worship service a covered dish picnic dinner was held 
on the grounds. Today the tradition continues on an 
annual basis every first Sunday of June. When the 
picnic shelter facility was added (see Chapter One, 
The Buildings — Other Building Appurtenances) people 

no longer had to spread their baskets out on the 



50 



ground, but could combine their lunches for a more 
universal dinner. 

Another common practice begun in the early 1900's 
was that of providing a Christmas treat for the young- 
sters and the older members of nuts , fruit, and candy. 
This tradition continued for many years but was dis- 
continued around 1970. A Christmas program has been 
prepared throughout the past several years . The first 
such program of record was for the December of 1909. 
The program committee consisted of Mrs. L. F. Trox- 
ler, Mrs. T. J. Gwynn, Miss Sal lie Somers, Miss Lula 
Smith, and Miss Lula Jordan. 

Every spring Shiloh Church holds its annual 
revival service, a practice known to have been pursued 
as far back as 1910. Earlier such meetings were likely, 
and at one time were held in the fall of the year with 
two services each day separated by a picnic dinner. 
Eventually the first service was changed to 5 o'clock 
and the second followed after supper. For the past 
several years a single service has been held at night. 
Usually a guest preacher or speaker was invited to 
preside in these evangelistic services. Sometimes a 
different speaker would appear each night (or day) of 
the revival week. On Sunday night of April 28, 1974 
Bishop Robert M. Blackburn, Presiding Bishop of the 
North Carolina Conference East, preached the fifth 



51 



and final revival service sermon at Shiloh Church. 
Clarence C. Matkins recorded the Order of Worship 
to include the Opening Prayer by Dr. Nick W. Grant, 
Superintendent of the Burlington District and the 
Altar Call by Dr. S. J. S tames, Pastor of Shiloh. 

One past practice that certainly is foreign to 
the "liberated" membership today is that of requiring 
the ladies, girls, and younger children to sit on the 
right hand side of the Church as you entered, and the 
men and older boys to sit on the left side. In order 
to provide such access to the sanctuary, two front 
doors were built on the front of the church building 
of 1895 (see Illus. 1.1). It is not known at this 
time when this practice began, but it was discontinued 
in 1936 when the next addition to the Church was made 
(see Chapter One, The Buildings). At some time the 
two doors of the 1895 church front were painted red, 
and remained that color until the addition of 1936. 

Many special services have highlighted the Order 
of Worship at Shiloh at various intervals. One such 
service occurred on April 1, 1979 when the Burlington 
Boys Choir under the direction of Miss Eva Wiseman 
performed during the regular worship service. A 
mixture of classical hymns and traditional songs of 



52 



praise were presented with Sharon Moss LaRocco accom- 
panying. The Burlington Boys Choir is internationally 
renowned, having travelled and performed abroad ex- 
tensively. The people of Shi 1 oh were especially proud 
to have one of their own members performing with the 
Boys Choir, Ray Gilliam, son of J. Wesley and Havoline 
Troxler Gilliam. 

Another special service of great significance 
occurred at Shi 1 oh on May 8, 1983. Susan Moore, mem- 
ber of Camp Springs United Methodist Church, delivered 
the sermon during the regular worship service. Miss 
Moore, a student at Duke University in preparation 
for the ministry, represented a movement of introduc- 
ing women into the pastorship of the United Methodist 
Church, and provided Shiloh with its first visiting 
preacher of the female gender. 

THE MEMBERSHIP 

Two important contributions of note should be 
mentioned within these lines, and that is of the 
legacies of Mr. and Mrs. L. Gibbons Matkins and Mrs. 
Claude (Lecy) Kernodle. On Aug. 24, 1976 the estate 
of Mr. and Mrs. Matkins was granted to Shiloh United 
Methodist Church and the 8.95 acres of land in Cas- 
well County was appraised and sold for $5,000.00. The 



53 



subsequent funds were placed in the perpetuating 
Cemetery Fund of Shiloh where they continue to be 
beneficial to the upkeep and maintenance of the cem- 
etery and surrounding grounds. In 1983 the will of 
Mrs. Lecy Kernodle disclosed the grant of $33,319.00 
also to be left to the Cemetery Fund of Shiloh. For- 
mal presentation was made on Feb. 19, 1984. 

An accurate chronological list of all the mem- 
bers to ever have belonged to Shiloh Methodist Church 
may well be impossible to accumulate. However, by 
including the names that appear on deeds, assessment 
lists, and extant membership rolls, we may compile 
an extensive membership composite which represents 
Shiloh' s pioneers and extends to the present, formal 
records. The list which follows is divided into 
two parts. First, is the earliest members for which 
no formal confirmation is known, but whose names are 
indelibly etched into our recorded history and deserve 
a place on the membership roll, even if honorary. 
This section represents a span of time from 1814-1883. 
Since only those persons whose names have appeared in 
other records are listed in this first roll, there are 
certainly some of the earliest members who may have 
been omitted: merely through lack of available documen 
tat ion. We may assume that the spouse and some of the 
children of those in the list would have also been or 



54 



become members as well. The second section of Shiloh 
Church's Membership Roll consists of those persons 
whose names have been previously documented as a mem- 
ber on some existing membership list. This second por- 
tion represents the years from 1884-1983. Those mem- 
bers whose date is 1884 are those who were listed on 
the assessment list in the Morton's Journal, and most 
likely were actually confirmed as members of the 
Methodist Church sometime earlier. 

SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL NOTES : 

1. No date of receivership indicates that no date 
is available by record. 

2. A member with a receivership date of 1884 could 
have been joined earlier to the Church. 

3. For a member who joined Shiloh Church, then later 
transferred membership to another Church, only to 
transfer back at a later date will be represented 
by their original date of membership. 

4. Women members may be found lis ted either by their 
maiden name, or married name, or both. 

5. The baptism date of many members is known but not 
recorded in this roll. Refer to church member- 
ship records for a full account of any member. 



55 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 
SECTION ONE 

NAME DATE ON RECORD 

Bouldin, John 1836 

Brannock, Alexander 1836 

Brannock, William 1814 

Dilworth, Thomas 1814 

Fielder, Benjamin 1814 

Foster, George 1836 

Foster, John 1836 

Foster, Samuel 1836 

Foster, William 1836 

Garret, Thomas 1814 

Harbin, George 1836 

Lewis, Andrew 1846 ? 

Matkins, John 1814 

Matkins, Noah 1836 

Matkins, William 1814 

Simpson, Roger 1814 

Thomas, David 1836 

Thompson, Henry 1814 

Thompson, Thomas 1814 

Williams, William 1814 



56 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 
SECTION TWO 



NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Adams, Elbert 


Aug. 




1928 


Apple, Betty Jean Sayers 


May 


6 


, 1955 


Apple, Carol C. Matkins 


May 


10 


, 1970 


Apple, Claude 


Aug. 


14 


, 1921 


Apple, Mary E. (Lewis) 


Nov. 




1914 


Apple, Theresa Herb in 






1949 


Ashley, Deborah T. Howerton 


Apr. 


28 


, 1963 


Baldwin, Bonnie 






1981 


Baldwin, Kimberly S. 


Sep. 


23 


, 1979 


Baldwin, Mitchell E. 


Jan. 


31 


, 1982 


Baldwin, Richard 






1981 


Barber, Chris 


Nov. 


6 


, 1966 


Barber, Douglas 


Nov. 


6 


, 1966 


Barber, Margaret F. Smith 


Jul. 


6 


1941 


Barber, Timothy 


Apr. 


14 


1968 


Barber, Vernon J. 


Nov. 


6 


1966 


Barber, Wei don J. 


Dec. 


1 


, 1974 


Barker, Albert M. 


Nov. 


7. 


1937 


Barker, Annie S. Matkins 


Aug. 


9 


, 1917 


Barker, Cornelia S. (Yates) 








Barker, Minnie J. Gilliam 


Aug. 


3. 


1905 


Beason, Nancy Peeples 


May 


5. 


1955 


Boone, Albert V. 


Apr. 


30. 


1905 


Boone, Cora A. 


Apr. 


30. 


1905 


Boone, Elsie 


Aug. 


6. 


1920 


Boone, J. Aticus 


Apr. 


23. 


1900 


Boone, Jerome J. 


Aug. 


9. 


1892 


Boone, John J. 








Boone, John P. 






1884 


Boone, Mary C. 









57 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 
SECTION TWO 





NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Boone, Mary S. 


Apr. 


23. 


1900 


Boone, Peter V. 








Boone, S 


. F. 








Boone, Samuel T. 


Jun. 


30. 


1895 


Boone, Sarah J. 


Apr. 


23. 


1900 


Boone, Victor 


Aug. 


9. 


1892 


Boone, William J. 


Aug. 


9. 


1892 


Boswell, 


Mary H. 


Sep. 


24 


1896 


Boswell , 


Mary K. 


Sep. 


24. 


1896 


Bouldin, 


Addie 


May 


1 


1938 


Bouldin, 


Alene E. (Somers) 


Sep. 


5 


, 1912 


Bouldin, 


Bettie M. Faucette 






1884 


Bouldin, 


Billy Russell 


Aug. 


4 


, 1946 


Bouldin, 


CI aude 


Aug. 


14 


, 1921 


Bouldin, 


George 


Aug. 


14 


1921 


Bouldin, 


Jo Ann (Payne) 


Aug. 


4 


1946 


Bouldin, 


Joe H. 


Aug. 


6 


1914 


Bouldin, 


John L. 


Feb. 


17 


1905 


Bouldin, 


Johnnie 


Aug. 


14 


1921 


Bouldin, 


Katherine 


Aug. 


4 


1946 


Bouldin, 


Katie B. Faucette 






1884 


Bouldin, 


Lelia Walker 


Aug. 


6 


1914 


Bowles, i 


(atie Brannock 








Brand, Bertha R. Gilliam 


Aug. 


3 


1905 


Brannock 


, Annie R. (Miller) 


Oct. 


15 


1902 


Brannock 


, Ella M. 


Oct. 


18 


1896 


Brannock 


, James L. 


Jun. 


20. 


1948 


Brannock 


, James R. 


Sep. 


24. 


1896 


Brannock 


, Katie (Bowles) 








Brannock 


, Lois W. Matkins 


Aug. 


6. 


1933 


Brannock 


, Rosanna 






1884 


Brannock 


, Thomas V. 


Sep. 


17. 


1905 


Brannock 


, Walter 


Sep. 


16. 


1900 


Brannock 


, William 









58 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 
SECTION TWO 



NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Brown, Anderrena (Lewis) 


Dec. 


7, 


1947 


Brown, Lula R. Jones 


Sep. 


5, 


1912 


Browning, Sherry Ann 


May 


6, 


1955 


Canady, Clara K. 


Sep. 


17, 


1916 


Canady, Coca A. 


Sep. 


17, 


1916 


Cantrell, Jennie Mae Lewis 


Aug. 


14, 


1921 


Chandler, Lucille (Roberts) 


Jul. 




1954 


Chatham, Becky (Elliott) 


Apr. 


23, 


1963 


Chatham, Calvin 


Apr. 


28, 


1963 


Chatham, Clem 








Chatham, Lib 








Chester, Archie 






1950 


Chester, (Mrs.) Harley A. 






1950 


Chrismon, Ernestine Moore 


Jul. 


19, 


1953 


Cobb, Lena J. 


Oct. 


3, 


1907 


Coble, Margie Lewis 






1949 


Coleman, Elizabeth 






1884 


Coleman, Hawkins 








Coleman, J. H. 






1884 


Coleman, J. T. 






1884 


Coleman, James 








Coleman, Nancy H. 








Cook, David T. 


Oct. 


15, 


1902 


Cook, Ida 


Oct. 


3, 


1901 


Cook, Nettie 


Aug. 


4, 


1904 


Cox, Ida M. Matkins 


Aug. 


3, 


1905 



59 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 





SECTION TWO 










NAME 


DATE 


RECEIVED 


Demarra, Gloria Lee Matkins 


Aug. 


6, 


1933 


Diamonc 


1, Ed. L. 


Sep. 


25, 


1908 


Diamonc 


1, Maggie 


Aug. 


3, 


1905 


Dixon, 
Dodson. 


Rebecca N. Herb in 
Vena (Lewis) 






1947 
1923 


Durham. 


Annie (Lee) 






1949 


Durham. 


Barbara S. 


May 


30, 


1961 


Durham 


Bessie Shepherd 


Aug. 


2, 


1931 


Durham. 


Billy J. 


May 


5, 


1955 


Durham. 


Brenda 


Jun. 


25, 


1961 


Durham. 


Elizabeth (Michael) 


Jun. 


10, 


1938 


Durham. 


Ella Virginia 


Feb. 


1, 


1948 


Durham 


Elmo 


Aug. 




1930 


Durham 


Fannie B. 


Aug. 


3, 


1905 


Durham 


Fr ance s ( Nance ) 






1949 


Durham 


, Frank 


Aug. 


2, 


1906 


Durham 


Fred 


Aug. 




1930 


Durham 


, George A. 


Sep. 


5, 


1912 


Durham 


, Harold 


May 


5, 


1955 


Durham 


Harrison 


Aug. 




1930 


Durham 


, James H. 


May 


5, 


1955 


Durham 


, John E. 


Aug. 


3, 


1905 


Durham 


, Judy Faye 


May 


5, 


1955 


Durham 


, Linda G. 


Jun. 


25, 


1961 


Durham 


, Mamie 


Sep. 


5, 


1912 


Durham 


( Mary Ida (Williams) 


Aug. 


3, 


1905 


Durham 


, Mary S. 


Sep. 


17, 


1905 


Durham 


, Mettie (Lovelace) 


Sep. 


5. 


1912 


Durham 


, Nannie 








Durham 


, Polly Ann 


Jun. 


25, 


1961 


Durham 


, Rosie 








Durham 


, Violet 






1949 


Durham 


, Walter H. 


Aug. 


3, 


1905 



60 





SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 








SECTION TWO 










NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Easter, Louise Smith 


Aug. 




1930 


Elliott, 


Becky Chatham 


Apr. 


28, 


1963 


Faucette . 


Annie B. (Gwynn) 


Nov. 


17, 


1895 


Faucette . 


Bettie H. 


Sep. 


24, 


1896 


Faucette . 


Bettie M. (Bouldin) 






1884 


Faucette . 


Catherine 








Faucette . 


Chesley H. 


Sep. 


24, 


1896 


Faucette . 


George R. 


Nov. 


5, 


1899 


Faucette . 


Henry L. 






1884 


Faucette . 


Jane 






1884 


Faucette . 


Jenetta 


Oct. 


3, 


1901 


Faucette . 


John A. 


Oct. 


15, 


1902 


Faucette . 


John W. 






1884 


Faucette 


Julia F. Phibbs 








Faucette 


Katie B. (Bouldin) 






1884 


Faucette 


Katie (Underwood) 


Aug. 


2, 


1906 


Faucette 


, Lucille (Reid) 


Aug. 


17, 


1947 


Faucette . 


Maggie A. 








Faucette . 


, Peter F. 






1884 


Faucette 


, Robert H. 


Sep. 




1891 


Faucette 


S. J. 








Faucette 


, Susie B. (Saunders) 


Oct. 


3, 


1907 


Faucette 


, Samuel F. 


Sep. 


24, 


1896 


Faucette 


, Verdie J. (Smith) 


Oct. 


15, 


1902 


Felmet, I 


tuth Troxler 


Sep. 


16, 


1934 


Fitch, Ar 


in Marie 


Nov. 


2, 


1980 


Fitch, C< 


irolyn Howerton 


May 


5, 


1957 


Fitch, (k 


irald 


Jun. 


1, 


1975 


Fitch, Je 


if frey Lynn 


Nov. 


2, 


1980 



61 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 





SECTION TWO 










NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Ger ringer, Annie Matkins 


Aug. 


18, 


1910 


Ger ringer, Beverly Jean (Holy field) 






1950 


Gerringer, Cheryl (Star) 


Oct. 


30, 


-1966 


Gerringer, Frances Page 






1954 


Gerringer, Hulon 






1949 


Gerringer, Lisa 


May 


9. 


1971 


Gerringer, Ranee 


Apr. 


28, 


1963 


Gerringer, Shirley 


Aug. 


7. 


1960 


Gerringer, Talmadge C. 


Aug. 


6. 


1920 


Gillespie, Julia M. Lewis 


May 


5. 


1955 


Gilliam 


Bertha (Herb in) 


Nov. 


15. 


1931 


Gilliam 


, Carlton Ray 


Aug. 


27. 


1978 


Gilliam 


, Donna 


Apr. 


10 


, 1977 


Gilliam 


, Doris 


Apr. 


18. 


1965 


Gilliam 


, Emery 


Dec. 


1. 


, 1974 


Gilliam 


, Havoline Troxler 


Apr. 


1 


, 1956 


Gilliam 


, Janice (Newsom) 


Nov. 


6. 


1966 


Gilliam 


, Leigh Ann 


May 


6. 


1973 


Gilliam 


, Lor a Herb in 


Aug. 




1927 


Gilliam 


, Minnie J. (Barker) 


Aug. 


3. 


1905 


Gilliam 


, Nancy Re id 


Jan. 


19. 


1964 


Gilliam 


, Ora (Matkins) 


Aug. 


9. 


1925 


Gilliam 


, Steve 


Apr. 


14. 


1968 


Gilliam 


, Susan Marie 


Dec. 


19. 


, 1982 


Gilliam 


, Wesley 


Nov. 


8. 


1964 


Griffin 


, David 








Griffin 


, June Carol Lewis 


May 


5. 


, 1955 


Griffin 


, Kathy Wade 


Sep. 


18. 


1960 


Gwynn, t 


toie B. Faucette 


Nov. 


17. 


1895 


Gwynn, ] 


Set tie E. 


Oct. 


3. 


1907 


Gwynn, I 


)ella D. 


Nov. 


20. 


1901 


Gwynn, I 


)ora B. (Tate) 








Gwynn, I 


Sliza (Simpson) 


Aug. 


9. 


1892 


Gwynn, ] 


Elizabeth 


Jul. 


18, 


1954 


Gwynn, I 


Stta May (Phillips) 


Oct. 


3. 


1907 



62 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 
SECTION TWO 



NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Gwynn, Fannie (Williamson) 


Aug. 


9 


, 1892 


Gwynn, John W. 


Nov. 


16 


, 1900 


Gwynn, Marie (Peeples) 


Jul. 




1954 


Gwynn, Mary J. (Simpson) 


Aug. 


3 


, 1905 


Gwynn, Minnie E. 


Sep. 


5 


, 1912 


Gwynn, Mo Hie L. Matkins 








Gwynn, Robert L. 


Oct. 


20 


, 1908 


Gwynn, Samuel T. 


Oct. 


3 


, 1907 


Gwynn, Scott 


Aug. 




1927 


Gwynn, Thomas J. 








Gwynn, Wilbur L. 


Aug. 


2 


, 1906 


Gwynn , Z achar iah 


Sep. 


20 


, 1891 


Hall, Betty 


Jan. 




1975 


Hall, James 


Jan. 




1975 


Hal 1 , Lonna 


Aug. 


17 


, 1975 


Hall, Nannie L. (McKinney) 








Hardy, Betty Sue 


May 


6 


, 1955 


Harris, Jo Ann Matkins 


May 


5 


, 1957 


Harrison, Janis 


Dec. 


4 


, 1977 


Harrison, Jay 


Dec. 


4 


, 1977 


Hensely, Mildred Somers 


Aug. 


28 


, 1921 


Herb in, Allen Norman 


Sep. 


10 


, 1916 


Herb in, Alvin Norman 


Jun. 


12 


, 1942 


Herb in, Bertha Gilliam 


Nov. 


15 


, 1931 


Herb in, Ethel 


Nov. 


15 


1931 


Herb in, F. L. 






1884 


Herb in, James Monroe 


Nov. 


15 


, 1931 


Herb in, Janet 


Aug. 


17 


1975 


Herb in, Kermit 


Aug. 


6 


1920 



63 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 

SECTION TWO 

NAME DATE RECEIVED 

Herb in, Lora (Gilliam) Aug. 1927 

Herb in, Mandy Troxler Nov. 15, 1931 

Herbin, Michael A. Apr. 14, 1968 

Herbin, Patricia Jun. 25, 1961 

Herbin, Rebecca (Dixon) 1947 
Herbin, Roberta Duel la (Lewis) 

Herbin, Russell Sep. 5, 1912 

Herbin, Theresa (Apple) 1949 

Herndon, Inez Matkins Aug. 9, 1917 

Herndon, (Mrs.) Thomas Mar. 17, 1954 

Hodges, Denise Whitesell 1952 

Holyfield, Beverly Jean Gerringer 1950 

Howerton, Carolyn (Fitch) May 5, 1957 

Howerton, Deborah T. (Ashley) Apr. 28, 1963 

Howerton, Dorothy Justice 1972 

Howerton, Edker Banks Apr. 28, 1959 

Howerton, Etta G. (Newton) 1949 

Howerton, Garland D. Jul. 18, 1948 

Howerton, Garland F. 1954 

Howerton, Irene Troxler Aug. 1928 

Howerton, Louise Garner Dec. 1, 1974 

Howerton, Marcie I. (Poythress) Apr. 28, 1963 

Hyler, Claude 1930 



Ingold, Rachel 1884 



James, Charlie Aug. 1930 

Jones, Ada Dec. 2, 1917 

Jones, Arthur Aug. 14, 1921 

Jones, Blanche (Thomasson) Aug. 14, 1921 



64 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 
SECTION TWO 



Jones . 


NAME 


DATE 
Feb. 


REC 
15, 


EIVED 


Clemis H. 


1948 


Jones . 


Effie (Workman) 


Aug. 


8, 


1919 


Jones . 


Ellen 






1967 


Jones . 


Evelyn (McAlister) 


Aug. 


2, 


1931 


Jones . 


Grace Lane 






1949 


Jones . 


J. Y. 


Dec. 


2, 


1917 


Jones . 


Jack 


Sep. 


7, 


1924 


Jones . 


James Luthur 


Sep. 


5, 


1912 


Jones . 


John W. 


Aug. 


2, 


1931 


Jones . 


(Mrs.) John 






1949 


Jones . 


Lula R. (Brown) 


Sep. 


5, 


1912 


Jones . 


01 lie (Brown) 


Aug. 


14, 


1921 


Jones . 


Ora 


Aug. 


6, 


1914 


Jones . 


, Richard W. 


Oct. 


17, 


1960 


Jones 


Ruth (Wagoner) 


Aug. 


2, 


1931 


Jordan, Annie Lula Smith 


Oct. 


20, 


1908 


Jordan, George E. 






1884 


Jordan, George M. 


Nov. 


5, 


1899 


Jordan, James Monroe 






1884 


Jordan, John H. 


Oct. 


15, 


1902 


Jordan, Lula L. (Smith) 


Nov. 


16, 


1900 


Jordan, Mary E. 


Sep. 


5, 


1912 


Jordan, Missouri 








Joyce, Becky Matkins 


Apr. 


28, 


1963 


Joyner, M. Louise Wade 








Justice, Deborah (Troxler) 








Justice, Dorene 






1972 


Keck, Ann D. 


May 


10, 


1970 


Keck, Charles P. 


May 


5, 


1955 


Keck, 


Jerry 


May 


5, 


1955 



65 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 



SECTION TWO 








NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Keck, Lillian 






1962 


Keck, Roger Eugene 


May 


5, 


1955 


Kernodle, Claude 


Dec. 


5, 


1972 


Kemodle, Delia Mae 






1949 


Kernodle, Dora Cassie Soroers 


Oct. 


3, 


1901 


Kernodle, James M. 


Jan. 


12, 


1964 


Kernodle, John Frank, Jr. 






1949 


Kernodle, Lecy 


Aug. 


19, 


1956 


Kernodle, Lor a Mae 


Aug. 


23, 


1979 


Kernodle, Mark D. 


Aug. 


17, 


1975 


King, Kaddy J. Wade 


Sep. 


18, 


1960 


King, Mary A. 


Oct. 


15, 


1902 


King, Michael Todd 


Nov. 


2, 


1980 


King, Tommy 


Nov. 


6, 


1966 


Lee, Annie Durham 






1949 


Lee, Cindy (Troxler) 


May 


10, 


1970 


Lee, Deannie 


May 


9, 


1971 


Lester, Bessie E. Lewis 


Jul. 


9, 


1937 


Lewis, A. Morris 






1884 


Lewis, Alice Troxler 


Aug. 


8, 


1919 


Lewis, Alton P. 


Sep. 


10, 


1916 


Lewis, Amber 


Jun. 


6, 


1971 


Lewis, Anderrena Brown 


Dec. 


7, 


1947 


Lewis, Annie Bell 


Feb. 


21, 


1915 


Lewis, Bessie 


Sep. 


24, 


1895 


Lewis, Bessie Elizabeth (Lester) 


Jul. 


9, 


1937 


Lewis, C. Ervin 


Oct. 


18, 


1936 


Lewis, C. Lee 


Aug. 


9, 


1892 


Lewis, Charlie L. 






1942 


Lewis, Edith F. 


Aug. 


4, 


1946 


Lewis, Edward Poe 


Aug. 


4, 


1904 



66 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 

SECTION TWO 

NAME DATE RECEIVED 

Elbert H. Nov. 5, 1899 

Ervie Apr. 5, 1959 

Esther (Reid) Jun. 30, 1895 

Eugenia E. (Matkins) 

Eva J. Apr. 18, 1903 

Eva. 0. (Wagoner) Aug. 10, 1916 

Fverette Aug. 9, 1917 

Floyd 1945 

Frank Aug. 1928 

Frank B. 

Glen W. Sep. 10, 1916 

George R. Aug. 18, 1910 

George W. 1884 

Hattie P. Aug. 4, 1904 

Jack Sep. 7, 1924 

Jennie Mae (Cantrell) Aug. 14, 1921 

Jerry 1950 

John A. 

John W. 

Julia M. (Gillespie) 

June Carol (Griffin) May 5, 1955 

Karen Apr. 28, 1963 

Kenneth B. Sep. 10, 1916 

Lelia H. (Watlington) Oct. 3, 1907 

Lorenzo 

Louise Workman Aug. 6, 1933 

Lucy 

Margie (Coble) 1949 

Mary E. Apple Nov. 1914 

Mary S. (Smith) Aug. 9, 1917 

Or a S. Matkins Oct. 18, 1896 

Paul Thomas 1944 



67 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 





SECTION TWO 




NAME 


Lewis. 


Robert 


Lewis. 


Robert W. 


Lewis. 


Roberta Duel la Herb in 


Lewis. 


Ruth 


Lewis 


Sal lie 


Lewis 


, Sam 


Lewis 


Sam F. 


Lewis 


Samuel A. 


Lewis 


Samuel Freeman 


Lewis 


, Samuel Freeman, Jr. 


Lewis 


, Sarah A. 


Lewis 


Vena Dodson 


Lewis 


, William A. 


Lewis 


, William Calvin 


Lewis 


Willie 


Long, 


Clarence Jr. 


Long, 


James 


Long, 


Phyllis A. 


Long, 


Robert J. 


Lovelc 


ice, Addie 


Lovelc 


ice, Lottie 


Lovelc 


ice, Louie H. 


Lovelc 


ice, Mettie Durham 


Lovelc 


ice, William 



Mansfield, Nettie J. (Sutton) 
Mansfield, Willie J. 
Martindale, Charlie 
Martindale, Inez 



DATE 


RECEIVED 


May- 


10, 


1970 


No v. 


17, 


1895 


May 


10, 


1970 


Aug. 




1930 


Aug. 


9, 


1392 
1884 


Jul. 


17, 


1932 


Apr. 


5, 


1959 

1923 

1884 
1942 


Oct. 


17, 


1960 


Oct. 


17, 


1960 


Oct. 


17, 


1960 


Oct. 


18, 


1936 


Aug. 


9, 


1925 


Aug. 


9, 


1925 


Aug. 


6, 


1914 


Sep. 


5, 


1912 


Aug. 


6, 


1914 


Sep. 


24, 


1896 


Sep. 


24, 


1896 


Mar. 


19, 


1961 


Mar. 


19, 


1961 



68 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 





SECTION TWO 










NAME 


DATE 


RECEIVED 


Matkins 


, Angettie 


Aug. 


4, 


1904 


Matkins 


, Annie K. (Ger ringer) 


Aug. 


18, 


1910 


Matkins 


, Annie S. (Barker) 


Aug. 


9, 


1917 


Matkins 


, Barbara (Morris) 


Apr. 


28, 


1963 


Matkins 


, Becky (Joyce) 


Apr. 


28, 


1963 


Matkins 


, Bernice 


Apr. 


9, 


1960 


Matkins . 


Carol C. (Apple) 


May 


10, 


1970 


Matkins . 


Cassie (Mitchell) 


Aug. 


14, 


1921 


Matkins 


, Clarence 


Aug. 




1930 


Matkins 


, Claude 


Aug. 




1930 


Matkins 


, Coy F. 


Aug. 




1928 


Matkins 


Donald 






1945 


Matkins 


, Effie C. 


Nov. 


5, 


1899 


Matkins 


, Elizabeth 






1962 


Matkins 


, Ella B. 


Aug. 


4, 


1904 


Matkins 


, Esker B. 


Oct. 


18, 


1896 


Matkins 


, Eugenia E. Lewis 








Matkins 


, Florence 


Jul. 




1954 


Matkins 


, Frank Marion 


Aug. 


9, 


1917 


Matkins 


, Freida Jo 


Apr. 


14, 


1968 


Matkins 


, George W. 


Jan. 


15, 


1905 


Matkins 


, George W. 


Oct. 


18, 


1936 


Matkins 


, Gloria Lee (DeMarra) 


Aug. 


6, 


1933 


Matkins 


, Ida L. (Walker) 


Aug. 


9, 


1892 


Matkins 


, Ida M. (Cox) 


Aug. 


3, 


1905 


Matkins 


, Ila (Terrell) 


Aug. 




1928 


Matkins 


, J. C. Jr. 


Aug. 


6, 


1933 


Matkins 


, J. Marion 


Sep. 


24, 


1896 


Matkins 


, James B. 








Matkins 


, James D. 


Aug. 


4, 


1904 


Matkins 


, Janice Lee 


May 


5, 


1955 


Matkins 


, Jerry Franklin 


Apr. 


21, 


1957 


Matkins . 


Jeannie E. 


Sep. 


10, 


1916 



69 





SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 








SECTION TWO 










NAME 


DATE 


RECEIVED 


Matkins 


Jerry F. Jr. 


Aug. 


27 


1978 


Matkins . 


Jo Ann (Harris) 


May 


5 


, 1955 


Matkins . 


Joe 








Matkins . 


John A. 








Matkins . 


John C. 


Aug. 


18 


, 1910 


Matkins . 


John Norris 


Oct. 


18 


, 1936 


Matkins . 


Joseph Franklin 


Jun. 


12 


, 1942 


Matkins 


Julia Inez (Herndon) 


Aug. 


9 


, 1917 


Matkins 


Karon Smith 


Nov. 


24 


, 1968 


Matkins 


L. G. Jr. 


Aug. 




1930 


Matkins . 


Lemuel Gibbons 


Aug. 


9 


, 1892 


Matkins . 


Leonard F. 


Aug. 


14 


, 1921 


Matkins . 


Leta E. 


Jun. 


21 


, 1936 


Matkins 


Lois Winifred (Brannock) 


Aug. 


6 


, 1933 


Matkins . 


Louise K. 






1949 


Matkins . 


Lydia C. 


Oct. 


18 


, 1914 


Matkins . 


Margaret (Moore) 


Sep. 


7 


, 1924 


Matkins . 


Mary E. 


Sep. 


16 


, 1900 


Matkins . 


Mildred A. 


Sep. 


20 


, 1891 


Matkins . 


Mollie L. (Gwynn) 








Matkins . 


01 lie Bell 


Dec. 


5 


, 1937 


Matkins . 


, Ora H. Gilliam 


Aug. 


9 


, 1925 


Matkins . 


, Ora S. (Lewis) 


Oct. 


18. 


, 1896 


Matkins . 


Patsy 


Dec. 


4 


, 1977 


Matkins . 


Roda A. 


Aug. 


4 


, 1904 


Matkins . 


Sarah 








Matkins 


, Sarah B. 


Aug. 


3 


, 1905 


Matkins 


Sarrah 








Matkins 


Silas D. 


Sep. 


20. 


1891 


Matkins 


, Susan F. 


Sep. 


20. 


1891 


Matkins 


, Teresa Lynn 


May 


22. 


1977 


Matkins 


, Thelma L. 


Jun. 


10. 


1938 



70 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 
SECTION TWO 



NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Matkins, Thomas 








Matkins, Thomas F. 








Matkins, Thomas L. 








Matkins, Virginia Mildred (Troxler) 






1944 


Matkins, W. H. 






1884 


Matkins, William 


Aug. 


3, 


1905 


Matkins, Wm. A. (1) 








Matkins, Wm. A. (2) 








Matkins, Worth G. 


Aug. 


14, 


1921 


McAlister, Evelyn Jones 


Aug. 


2, 


1931 


McCann, Audrey (Thompson) 


Jul. 


19, 


1953 


McCann, Clara 






1950 


McCann, Clint 


May 


1, 


1971 


McCann, Jeanene 


Mar. 




1971 


McCann, Maynard 


Jul. 




1954 


McCann, Nola (Morrison) 


May 


10, 


1970 


McCann, Roy 






1950 


McKinney, Mabel 


Mar. 




1971 


McKinney, Nanny L. -Hall 








McKinney, Ruth P. 






1950 


McMillan, Annie Kate Troxler 


Aug. 




1927 


Michael, Elizabeth (Durham) 






1938 


Miller, Annie R. Brannock 


Oct. 


15, 


1902 


Mitchell, Cassie Matkins 


Aug. 


14, 


1921 


Moon, James D. 






1952 


Moon, (Mrs.) James D. 






1952 


Moore, Brenda (Smith) 


Jul. 


19, 


1953 


Moore, Charles 


Jun. 


16, 


1957 


Moore, David Jr. 






1945 


Moore, Dora M. 


Apr. 


18, 


1937 


Moore, Ernestine (Chrismon) 


Jul. 


19, 


1953 


Moore, Margaret Matkins 


Sep. 


7, 


1924 



Moore, David 



July 



1954 



71 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 

SECTION TWO 

NAME DATE RECEIVED 

Matkins, Vernon Lee 1950 

Matkins, William F. Jul. 1954 

Morris, Barbara Matkins Apr. 28, 1963 

Morrison, Jackie Dec. 9, 1979 

Morrison, Nola McCann May 10, 1970 
Murray, Annie Rose 

Morris, Kenneth Apr. 22, 1973 

Nance, Frances Durham 1949 

Newsom, Janice Gilliam Nov. 6, 1966 

Newton, Darrell 1973 

Newton, Elizabeth I. Aug. 17, 1975 

Newton, Etta G. Howerton 1948 

Nicks, Lula Price Jan. 18, 1948 



Odell, Felix Jun. 10, 1938 

Odell, Ruth Jun. 10, 1938 



Page, Frances (Gerringer) 1954 

Patterson, Bettie D. Nov. 19, 1905 

Payne, Jo Ann Bouldin Aug. 4, 1946 

Peeples, J. Edgar Jul. 1954 

Peeples, Marie Gwynn Jul. 1954 

Peeples, Nancy Gwynn (Beason) May 5, 1955 

Perkins, Mary Lou (Troxler) Sep. 11, 1966 
Phibbs, Angela 

Phibbs, Bettie J. 1884 



72 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 
SECTION WO 



NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Phibbs, Elizabeth J. 








Phibbs, Julia F. (Faucette) 








Phillip, Florence (Rich) 


Jun. 


10, 


1938 


Phillips, Etta May Gwynn 


Oct. 


3, 


1907 


Pryor, Lynette Wade 


Apr. 


28, 


1963 


Pryor, Philip 


Feb. 


7, 


1971 


Powell, Mary S. Vincent 


Oct. 


15, 


1902 


Poythress, Marcie I. Howerton 


Apr. 


28, 


1963 


Raisenan, George 


May 


14, 


1972 


Raisenan, Daisy Mae Wade 






1949 


Reid, Edna 


Aug. 




1927 


Reid, Esther Lewis 


Jun. 


30, 


1895 


Reid, John 


Aug. 




1928 


Reid, John Lee 


Jan. 


19, 


1964 


Reid, Larry Clinton 






1950 


Reid, Lucille Agatha 






1944 


Reid, Lucille Faucette 


Aug. 


17, 


1947 


Reid, Nancy (Gilliam) 


Jan. 


19, 


1964 


Reid, Willie N. 


Sep. 


7, 


1924 


Rich, Florence Phillip 


Jun. 


10, 


1938 


Roberts, Ellen Marie Strickland 






1950 


Roberts, Lucille Chandler 


Jul. 




1954 


Robertson, Cynthia Scarlette Troxler 


Sep. 


18, 


1960 


Robertson, Henderson 


Sep. 


20, 


1891 


Robertson, Loy Wilson 


Jul. 


2, 


1939 


Robertson, Lula Belle 


Jul. 


2, 


1939 


Robertson, W. H. 


Aug. 


4, 


1904 


Rose, Annie (Murray) 








Rose, Wily 









73 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 
SECTION TWO 





NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Saul , 


Jessie Lee Wade 


May 


5, 


1955 


Saunders, Christine 


Jun. 


16, 


1963 


Saunders, Eunice 


Jun. 


16, 


1963 


Saunders, Susie B. Faucette 


Oct. 


3, 


1907 


Sayers 


, Betty Jean (Apple) 


May 


6, 


1955 


Shepherd, Bessie F. (Durham) 


Aug. 


2, 


1931 


Shepherd, Charles James 


Aug. 




1930 


Shoe, ] 


I. R. 


Sep. 


16, 


1934 


Simpso] 


a, Boyd 


Aug. 


14, 


1921 


Simpson, Clyde H. 


Aug. 


9, 


1925 


Simpson, Eliza Gwynn 


Aug. 


9, 


1892 


Simpson, Margaret 






1884 


Simpson, Margie Louise 


Aug. 


6, 


1933 


Simpson, Mary J. Gwynn 


Aug. 


3, 


1905 


Simpson, Mary (Troxler) 


Jun. 




1954 


Simpson, Menesey 








Smith, 


Amy Michelle 


Nov. 


2, 


1980 


Smith, 


Annie Lula (Jordan) 


Oct. 


20, 


1908 


Smith, 


Brenda Moore 


Jul. 


19, 


1953 


Smith, 


H. S. 


Sep. 


25, 


1908 


Smith , 


Helene (Whitesell) 


Aug. 




1928 


Smith , 


Karon (Matkins) 


Nov. 


24, 


1968 


Smith, 


Lacy 


Aug. 




1930 


Smith, 


Louise (Easter) 


Aug. 




1930 


Smith, 


Lula L. Jordan 


Nov. 


16, 


1900 


Smith, 


Luthur 


Dec. 


13, 


1964 


Smith , 


Margaret Frances (Barber) 


Jul. 


6, 


1941 


Smith, 


Mary S. Lewis 


Aug. 


9, 


1917 


Smith, 


Ruth Somers 


Aut. 


6, 


1920 


Smith, 


Ubert C. 


Aug. 


9, 


1925 


Smith, 


Verdie J. Faucette 


Oct. 


15, 


1902 



74 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 





SECTION TWO 










NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Somers 


, Alene E. Bouldin 


Sep. 


5 


1912 


Somers 


, Corrie M. 


Sep. 


25. 


1908 


Somers 


, Cosmo 


Aug. 


28. 


1921 


Somers 


, Dora Cassie (Kemodle) 


Oct. 


3. 


1901 


Somers 


, Harry L. 


Sep. 


15 


1957 


Somers 


, J. Ralph 


Aug. 


2 


, 1931 


Somers 


, John Rankin 


Aug. 


3 


i 1911 


Somers 


, Kate A. 


Nov. 


15 


, 1931 


Somers . 


, Margaret S. 


Sep. 


5 


, 1912 


Somers . 


, Mary J. 


Oct. 


3 


, 1901 


Somers . 


, Mildred (Hens ley) 


Aug. 


28 


, 1921 


Somers . 


Paul 


Aug. 


28 


, 1921 


Somers . 


Robert 


Aug. 


2 


, 1906 


Somers 


Robert L. 


Nov. 


15 


1931 


Somers 


, Ruth (Smith) 


Aug. 


6 


, 1920 


Somers 


, Sal lie J. (Stewart) 


Oct. 


3 


, 1901 


Somers 


, Sam 


Nov. 


15 


, 1931 


Somers 


, Samuel E. 






1944 


Somers 


, Vera Holt 


Sep. 


3 


, 1939 


Stall ir 


lgs, Bertha M. 


Nov. 


17 


, 1957 


Stall ir 


lgs, Daniel 


Nov. 


17 


, 1957 


Stall ir 


lgs, Mary Ann 


Sep. 


15 


, 1957 


Stall ir 


lgs, Nancy M. 


Sep. 


15 


, 1957 


Star, ( 


Cheryl Gerringer 


Oct. 


30 


, 1966 


Steele 


, Jean (Wade) 






1966 


Stewart 


;, Sal lie J. Somers 


Oct. 


3 


, 1901 


S trick! 


and, Claude 






1927 


S trick: 


.and, (Mrs.) Claude 


Aug. 




1947 


S trick] 


and, Ellen Marie (Roberts) 






1950 


S trick! 


and, Franklin 






1949 


S trick: 


and, Glenn Curtis 


May 


5 


, 1955 


S trick: 


and, Leonard 






1950 


S trick] 


.and, Maybelle W. 


Jul. 


22 


, 1947 


Strick] 


.and, William P. 


Jul. 


22 


, 1947 


Strick] 


Land, William T. 






1950 


Surratl 


:e, Emma 


Oct. 


18 


, 1936 


Sutton 


, Nettie J. Mansfield 


Sep. 


24 


, 1896 



75 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 

SECTION TWO 
NAME 



Tate, Dora B. Gwynn 

Taylor, Anna 

Terrell, H. Preston 

Terrell, Howell Spencer 

Terrell, Ila Matkins 

Thomasson, Blanche Jones 

Thomas son, Dawn (Troxler) 

Thomasson, Hulon R. 

Thomasson, Sarah Katherine (Whitehurst 

Thomasson, Tommy 

Thompson, Audrey McCann 

Tickle, Elizabeth (Troxler) 

Trent, Iris Whitesell 

Troxler, Alice (Lewis) 

Troxler, Annie Kate (McMillan) 

Troxler, B. C. 

Troxler, Billie 

Troxler, Chelsea R. 

Troxler, Cindy Lee 

Troxler, Cynthia Scarlette (Robertson) 

Troxler, Daisy 

Troxler, Dawn Thomasson 

Troxler, Deborah Justice 

Troxler, Eddie R. 

Troxler, Effie Lee 

Troxler, Elizabeth Tickle 

Troxler, Elizabeth (Wade) 

Troxler, Havoline (Gilliam) 

Troxler, Henry 

Troxler, Hunter J. 

Troxler, Ira Lee 

Troxler, Irene (Howerton) 



DATE RECEIVED 


Nov. 


15, 


1970 


Aug. 


4, 


1935 


Aug. 




1928 


Aug. 


14, 


1921 
1948 


Apr. 


18, 


1937 
1944 


May 


6, 


1955 


Jul. 




1953 


Aug. 


16, 


1921 


Apr. 


21, 


1957 


Aug. 


8, 


1919 


Aug. 




1927 


Aug. 


6, 


1920 


Aug. 




1928 


May 


9, 


1971 


May 


10, 


1970 


Sep. 


18, 


1960 


Aug. 


10, 


1916 
1948 


Apr. 


28, 


1963 
1950 


Aug. 


16, 


1921 


Aug. 




1927 


Apr. 


1, 


1956 


Aug. 


16, 


1921 


May 


22, 


1977 


Aug. 


8, 


1919 


Aug. 




1928 



76 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 





SECTION TWO 










NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Troxler 


, J. Edward 


Jun. 


4 


, 1943 


Troxler 


J. Michael 


May 


9 


, 1971 


Troxler 


James Oliver 






1942 


Troxler 


Jeremy Davis 


Dec. 


18 


, 1983 


Troxler 


L. Paul 


Mar. 


19 


, 1939 


Troxler 


Lamer A. 






1950 


Troxler. 


Larry D. 


Apr. 


23 


, 1963 


Troxler. 


Laura Lee 


Jun. 


10 


, 1938 


Troxler. 


Lona Mae (Wicker) 


Aug. 




1927 


Troxler. 


Lor a Lee (Wade) 






1942 


Troxler . 


Lu Ann Christine 


May 


22 


, 1977 


Troxler. 


Mandy (Herb in) 


Nov. 


15 


, 1931 


Troxler. 


Mark William 


Apr. 


14 


, 1968 


Troxler. 


Mary Lou Perkins 


Sep. 


11 


, 1966 


Troxler. 


Mary Simpson 


Jun. 




1954 


Troxler. 


Robert Banks 


Aug. 


10 


, 1916 


Troxler. 


Robert L. Jr. 






1966 


Troxler. 


Robert Lee 


Aug. 


4 


, 1935 


Troxler. 


Rockie Davis 


May 


6 


, 1955' 


Troxler. 


Rodney Scott 


Apr. 


28 


, 1963 


Troxler. 


Ronald Craig 


Apr. 


14 


, 1968 


Troxler 


Ruth Mildred (Felmet) 


Sep. 


16 


, 1934 


Troxler 


Thomas 


Aug. 


6 


, 1920 


Troxler 


, Tonja Marie 


Dec. 


18 


, 1983 


Troxler 


, Virginia Mildred Matkins 






1944 


Troxler 


W. Hampton 


Aug. 


9 


, 1925 


Troxler 


W. Howard 


Oct. 


18 


, 1936 


Troxler 


Wilbert 


Aug. 




1928 


Truitt , 


(Mrs.) James 


May 


5 


, 1955 


Truitt , 


Scott 


May 


5 


, 1955 


Trull, . 


rill 


Dec. 


19. 


1982 


Trull, : 


fulie 


May 


6. 


1973 



77 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 

SECTION TWO 

NAME DATE RECEIVED 

Trull, Samuel E. Apr. 28, 1963 

Trull, Shirley Underwood 1945 

Trull, Steve Dec. 19, 1976 



Underwood, Evelyn Jun. 10, 1938 

Underwood, Howard Jun. 10, 1938 

Underwood, J. M. 1884 

Underwood, J. W. 1884 

Underwood, Kate (Faucette) Aug. 2, 1906 

Underwood, Shirley (Trull) 1945 



Vaughn, June Carroll Jul. 19, 1953 

Vinant, Sal lie 1884 

Vincent, Mary S. (Powell) Oct. 15, 1902 
Vincent, Thomson 



Wade, Arthur Mar. 19, 1939 

Wade, Cynthia Diane Sep. 23, 1979 

Wade, Daisy Mae (Pvaisanen) 1949 

Wade, Donna Dec. 15, 1974 

Wade, Douglas Apr. 28, 1964 

Wade, Gretchen Nell Dec. 19, 1982 

Wade, Harold Thomas 1950 

Wade, Janet Marie May 22, 1977 

Wade, Jean Steele 1966 

Wade, Jennifer Dec. 19, 1982 



78 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 





SECTION TWO 










NAME 


DATE RECEIVED 


Wade, Jessie Lee (Saul) 


May 


5, 


1955 


Wade, Kaddy J. (King) 


Sep. 


18, 


1960 


Wade, Kathy (Griffin) 


Sep. 


18, 


1960 


Wade, Lor a Lee Troxler 






1942 


Wade, Lynette (Pryor) 


Apr. 


28, 


1963 


Wade, M. Louise (Joyner) 


Apr. 


28, 


1963 


Wade, Mary Elizabeth Troxler 


Aug. 




1927 


Wade, Pepper Tee 


Dec. 


19, 


1982 


Wade, Rick L. 


May 


9, 


1971 


Wade, Robert J. 






1949 


Wade, Teresa Ann 


Aug. 


23, 


1979 


Wagoner, Ann 








Wagoner, Carnie 






1949 


Wagoner, Eva 0. Lewis 


Aug. 


10, 


1916 


Wagoner, Loretta 






1949 


Wagoner, Ruth Jones 


Aug. 


2, 


1931 


Walker 


Alexander 






1884 


Walker 


Allen T. 


Aug. 


6, 


1914 


Walker 


Anderson 






1949 


Walker 


Cathy 


May 


9, 


1971 


Walker 


Florence Mae 


Feb. 


19, 


1939 


Walker 


, Fred A. 


Sep. 


10, 


1916 


Walker 


, Galloway 


Aug. 




1928 


Walker 


, George I. 


Aug. 


9, 


1917 


Walker 


, George Thomas 


Feb. 


19, 


1939 


Walker 


, Ida L. Matkins 


Aug. 


9, 


1892 


Walker 


, James Boyd 


Sep. 


10, 


1916 


Walker 


, John H. 






1903 


Walker 


, Kate Susan 


Aug. 


4, 


1935 


Walker 


, Lelia (Bouldin) 


Aug. 


6, 


1914 


Walker 


, Madison B. 


Sep. 


5, 


1912 


Walker 


, Met tie C. (Waynich) 


Sep. 


25, 


1908 


Walker 


, Mildred Dorcas 


Feb. 


19, 


1939 


Walker 


, Mitchell 






1948 



79 



SHILOH CHURCH MEMBERSHIP ROLL 

SECTION TWO 

NAME 

Walker, Myrtle 

Walker, Pauline S. 

Walker, Susan 

Walker, Viola Anderson 

Watlington, Lelia H. Lewis 

Waynick, Mettie C. Walker 

Webster, Gary 

Westbrook, George Wallace 

Whitehurst, Katherine Thomasson 

Whitesell, Denise (Hodges) 

Whitesell Helene Smith 

Whitesell, Iris (Trent) 

Whitesell, Otis B. 

Whitesell, Paula 

Wicker, Lona Mae Troxler 

Wicker, S locum M. 

Williams, Mary Ida Durham 

Williams, Oscar 

Williamson, Fannie Gwynn 

Wilson, Annie 

Wilson, Annie May 

Workman, Catherine Louise (Lewis) 

Workman, Effie Jones 

Workman, Elizabeth Ann (Wrenn) 

Workman, James Preston 

Wrenn, Debbie 

Wrenn, E. Ann Workman 

Wrenn, Therwell 

Wrenn, David Eugene 



DATE RECEIVED 






1949 


Aug. 




1947 


Mar. 


2, 


1937 


Oct. 


3, 


1907 


Sep. 


25, 


1908 


Apr. 


4, 


1976 
1949 
1944 
1952 


Aug. 




1928 


Apr. 


21, 


1957 
1956 
1956 


Aug. 




1927 


May 


22, 


1977 


Aug. 


3, 


1905 


Sep. 


5, 


1912 


Aug. 


9, 


1892 


Sep. 


15, 


1934 


Sep. 


15, 


1934 


Aug. 


6, 


1933 


Aug. 


8, 


1919 
1944 
1961 


May 


9, 


1971 
1944 


Sep. 


18, 


1960 


May 


22, 


1977 



Yates, Cornelia S. Barker 



80 



4 
The Sunday School 



THE ORIGIN 

Training the young for usefulness of life has 
been an integral part of the Church ' s program through- 
out the ages and among all nations in which Christ has 
been the focus. Schools were established in monaster- 
ies throughout Europe in the early Middle Ages whereby 
the fundamentals of the Gospel might be propagated. 
Priests instructed families of their churches y espec- 
ially the young , with the tenets of their faith. Mar- 
tin Luthur established, as a means to undergird the 
Reformation, education for, and proper training of 
the children. We are aware that he established and 
successfully conducted Sunday Schools in Wirtemburg 
in 1527. Other reports indicate that Sabbath Day 
Schools were established in Europe and in England 
during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. 
However, due to a tendency toward the exclusion of 
religious influence in worldly affairs, the custom of 
combining education and religious training abated, 
and fell into disuse until the renewal of religious 
fervor enacted by such fellows as John Wesley. 



81 



EARLY FORMATION IN THE METHODIST CHURCH 

The early Methodist movement, even in its in- 
fancy, served as forerunner to the institution which 
we have come to know as Sunday School. In 1738 John 
Wesley formed the Wesleyan Church of England through 
prayer and Bible study meetings. Preparation for 
the Sunday School movement was evident in the emphasis 
placed on duties of the pastor as a religious instruc- 
tor, and recognition of the lack of religious educa- 
tion in the family. Wesley himself met continually 
with children in various places instructing them in 
religious training. In 1769 a young Methodist woman, 
Hannah Ball, established a Sunday School for the 
training of children in scripture at High Wycombe, 
England. By 1780, due in part to the groundwork of 
his predecessors, Robert Raikes initiated his plan of 
education to teach the children to read and get them 
into church. For his extensive work and contribution, 
Raikes is recognized as Father of the Sunday School . 
The need for organized Sunday School activities was 
quickly realized, and many early and devoted teachers 
extended its work. The Sunday School rapidly became 
a church institution with its responsibility for lead- 
ership delegated to the pastors. Consequently, in 
1798 the Methodist Sunday School Society was formed. 



82 



THE SUNDAY SCHOOL IN AMERICA 

In order to adhere to the discipline of Wes- 
ley's Methodism and the statutes of the Methodist 
Conference, the preachers naturally organized Sun- 
day Schools. In 1785 William Elliott, an English 
emigrant, founded the first Sunday School in America 
in his own home. The fundamentals of reading were 
first taught so that students could read the Word of 
God for themselves. The first official recognition 
of Sunday Schools by an American church is believed 
to have been by the Methodist Conference in 1790. 
At this time a need was realized to instruct poor 
children to read by the establishment of Sunday 
Schools in or near a place of public worship. Prior 
to 1827 all advances in Sunday School activity were 
isolated and local in their success. The turning 
point in organization came on April 2, 1827 with the 
establishment of a central denominational Sunday 
School Union. The primary object of Sunday Schools 
was to provide elementary education mixed with reli- 
gious training to those unable to achieve the same 
through common schools. For many, Sunday Schools 
provided the only education they would ever receive. 



83 



SUNDAY SCHOOL IN THE N. C. CONFERENCE 

No one man can be said to have had any greater 
impact upon the improvement and development of child- 
ren's religious education than did Francis Asbury. 
Although the North Carolina Conference was not of- 
ficially formed until 1838, Bishop Asbury' s influence 
in Methodism in North Carolina, especially in religious 
training of the young, is evidenced time and again. 
No doubt, Sunday Schools existed in North Carolina 
prior to 1800, but since conference records were not 
required until 1832, records are very scarce. The 
oldest Sunday School in the North Carolina Conference 
of authentic record was on the old Bladen Circuit 
named Grantham's Church formed in 181 7. As mentioned 
before, many disadvantaged and poor learned their 
first words of reading and wrote their first lines in 
these Sunday School s , because public schools were not 
then in existence. At the first session of the North 
Carolina Conference held in 1838, an account of Sab- 
bath Schools indicated that a total of 80 were pre- 
sently in force. These schools continued growth at 
a rapid pace and incorporated into their structure 
a learning process for adults as well as children. 
In 1876 S.V. Hoyle, Chairman of the N. C. Conference 
Sunday School Committee, stated that "the Sunday 
School ought to embrace not only the children and 
youth, but also all adults in each congregation." 



84 



SHILOH SUNDAY SCHOOL 



At the General Conference of 1878 provisions 
were made to organize all Sunday Schools as mission- 
ary societies. In keeping with this development, 
Shiloh Church organized a Missionary Society on 
July 15, 1883, which was a forerunner to the first 
Sunday School formed almost a year later. Members 
and officers of this Shiloh Missionary Society were 
as follows: 



A. Walker 
Missouri Faucette 
A. M. Lewis 
J. P. Boon 
Susan Walker 
G. E. Jordan 
J. R. Brannock 
Dora Lewis 
Julia Phibbs 
W. H. Brannock 
Loft in Kernodle 



President 

First Vice President 

Second Vice President 

Third Vice President 

Treasurer 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

First Busy Bee 

Second Busy Bee 

Third Busy Bee 

Fourth Busy Bee 



Thomas Bowles 
R. P. Bowles 
J. W. Lewis 
Peter R. Ingold 
Pvobert Maynard 
W. A. Lewis 
John A. Underwood 
W. P. Summers 
George Brannock 



W. J. Boon 
J. M. Jordan 
S. A. Lewis 
Mary J. Gwyn 
Anna Lev/is 
Lucy Lewis 
Pvosanna Brannock 
Elizabeth Phibbs 
Ned Brannock 



Sarah Lewis 
Eugenia Lewis 
Julia Lewis 
Rebecca Matlock 
Laura Gwyn 
Peter Faucette 
Wm. Matkins, Jr. 
James Maxwell 
Wm. Lewis, Jr. 



85 



John Walker Rufus Matlock M. B. Walker 
Rober Lewis Douglas Kernodle R. B. Simpson 
Rev. V. A. Sharpe 

On April 6, 1884 the first Sunday School of 

Shiloh Church was organized and was composed of 25 

ladies and 24 gents. The secretary's report of that 

first Sunday School is given below exactly as recorded. 

1. The S. S. was organized at Shiloh the first 
Sunday in April, April 6/84. A. Walker and 
S. A. Lewis had been appointed Superinten- 
dents of S. S. in charge. 

2. School was called to order at 2 o'clock and 
opened with singing and pr air (sic) by S. A. 
Lewis, superintendent in charge. 

3. G. E. Jordan was chosen as Secretary. 

4. The following were chosen as Teacher s-to wit, 

Teacher Class 1 J. H. Coleman 
Class 2 
Class 3 
Class 4 
Class 5 
Class 6 
Class 7 



Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Ast. Tr. 

Teacher 



Susan Walker 
Missouria Jordan 
Rosa Brannock 
Dora Lewis 
S. A. Lewis 
T. J. Gwyn, Ast. 
Sal lie Lewis 



5. Teachers present 7 



86 



6. Scholars present 42 

7. Collection for S. S. funds not any 
— Spectators 6 

The following lists of Sunday School teachers 
and scholars who attended that first day also appears 
in the record book as kept by G. E. Jordan, secretary. 

Class No 1 J. H. Coleman, teacher 
J. W. Lewis 
Peter F. Faucette 
Thos . J . Gwyn 
Walter Garrison 

Class No 2 Susan Walker, teacher 

Julia Phibbs Katie Brannock 
Katie B. Faucette Lidia V. Simpson 
Bettie M. Faucette Ginie Gilliam 
Molie Matkins Fannie Gilliam 
Ginie Gwynn Molie Bowles 

Class No 3 Missouria Jordan, teacher 
G . E . Brannock 
Win. Lewis, Jr. 
Bedford Rose 

Class No 4 Rosa Brannock, teacher 
Eugenia Lewis 
Anie Rose 
Julia Lewis 
Lucy Lewis 
Augusta Kernodle 



87 



Class No 5 Dora Lewis, teacher 
Eddie Matkins 
Yancie Matkins 
N. F. Brannock 
Robert W. Lewis 
J. H. Walker 
Huie Gwyn 

Class No 6 S. A. Lewis, teacher 

J. M. Jordan 

T. F. Matkins 

J. W. Faucet te 

A. M. Lewis 

M. B. Walker 

Class No 7 Sal lie Lewis, teacher 
Ida Kernodle 
Lizzie Lewis 
Frank Gwyn 

The following scholars were not listed in a 
particular class, but were shown as original mem- 
bers of the Sunday School . 

F. L. Herbin Elizabeth Coleman 

W. H. Matkins Margaret Faucette 

Tommie Matkins Dora Gilliam 

The records indicate that these classes were 
shuffled around and new members added very soon after 
the Sunday School originated. By May 25 after only 
one month had elapsed, literature was purchased for 
$2.10 with money collected from the scholars ($1.25) 
and the remaining $0.85 on credit. Also, by that 



88 



same date, 17 new scholars were added for a total 
enrollment of 66. 

During these years of initiation of the Shiloh 
Sunday School, the pastor of Shiloh, Rev. V. A. 
Sharpe, was serving on the first regularly appointed 
Quadrennial Sunday School Board as appointed by the 
North Carolina General Conference. It may well have 
been the efforts of Reverend Sharpe that stimulated 
the interest of our past church members to form the 
first Sunday School at Shiloh. Later that same year 
on Aug. 1, 1884 the Sunday School Conference of the 
Hillsboro District, of which Shiloh was a part, was 
organized at Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Throughout the following years the number of 
Sunday School members at Shiloh have not increased 
measurably nor varied greatly, with an average attend- 
ance of about 75 being the norm for today. Classes, 
teachers, and the class mixture have varied and 
changed during the years, while classrooms have also 
taken on new dimensions. In past years classes have 
been conducted out of doors, in the sanctuary, indivi- 
duals homes, the vestibule, the basement, upstairs, 
at the parsonage, and regular classrooms. Today, 
with the recent addition of an educational facility 
(1980 — see Chapter One, The Buildings), we enjoy 



89 



classrooms there, as well as in the main building 
and the Scout Hut. 

On April 30, 1922 the first Sunday School 
Conference of the Burlington Circuit was held at 
Shiloh Church. Lawyer E. S. W. Dameron delivered 
the address and the Secretary of the N. C. Conference 
Sunday Schools, L. L. Gobbel , was in attendance. A 
number of resolutions were adopted among which were: 
(1) That this charge Sunday School Conference be a 
permanent organization and (2) That the following 
officers be elected: L. L. Garrison, President; 
C. L. Lewis (Shiloh), Vice President; D. L. Waynick, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 

On a more local basis several area churches 
became involved in what they called the Morton Town- 
ship Sunday School Convention. The Convention was 
held annually for many years beginning around 1900. 
The two men who were most responsible for the origin 
and the continuation of the Convention were Mr. Will 
Taylor and Mr. R. A. Thompson. They would visit the 
participating churches every year prior to the Con- 
vention to kindle interest. The original participat- 
ing churches were Berea , Bethel , Bethlehem, Fairview, 
Shiloh, and Stony Creek. As other churches in the 
Morton Township were formed, they too were invited 
to attend. A typical Convention began about 9: 30 A. M. 



90 



and continued until late afternoon with a 90 minute 
break for lunch. Singing, devotions, recitations, 
lessons, reports, and various addresses were pre- 
sented by different members representing all the 
participating churches. On page 92 is an actual 
program from the Convention held on July 30, 1922 
at Shiloh M. E. Church. Note the reference near the 
end to bringing a lunch basket. In 1962 Mr. Will 
Taylor died. In 1963 Mr. R. A. Thompson died. The 
last Morton Township Sunday School Convention was 
held at Altamahaw Pentacostal Holiness Church in 1963. 

Through the years a scarcity of recordkeeping 
limits our knowlidge of participating Sunday School 
officers. We do know that the first Co -Superintend- 
ents in 1884 were named as Alexander Walker and Sam 
A. Lewis and that the Secretary at that time was 
G. E. Jordan. During the early years of Sunday School 
at Shiloh the officers usually served several years 
at their positions, but later began to serve only 
one or two years. 

A Sunday School Record Book was kept up to date 
from July 19, 1908 to January 1, 1916 by George E. 
Jordan and W. A. Matkins, who served as Secretaries. 
During these years G. W. Matkins and J. M. Jordan 
were Superintendents and were in charge of the worship 
service on Sundays that the preacher was at a different 



91 



PROGRAM 

Morton Township Sunday School Convention 



HELD AT 



SHILOH M. E. CHURCH, 

Sunday, July 30, 1922 



MORNING SESSION 

9:30 — Song Service. 
10':00 — Two Songs by Each Sunday School: 

1. Shiloh; 2. Stoney Creek; 3. Bethlehem; 4. Berea; 

5. Bethel; 6. Fairview; 7. New Salem. 

11:00 — Devotional Exercises Rev. D. A. Petty 

11:15— Roll Call of Schools. 

11:30 — Song by Convention. 

11:35 — Recitation by Miss Mary Lewis. 

11:50— Address by J. C. McCulloch. 

Song. 
12 :05 — The Junior Sunday School Lesson .... Miss Fay Simpson 
12:20 — Christian Citizenship Alphonzo Mclntyre 

Recess: One Hour and Thirty Minutes. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

2:00 — Song Service. 

2:10 — Essay: The Church Miss Annie G. Paschall 

2:15 — Report from State Convention Paul Ireland 

2:20 — The Value of Our Church Paper in the Home 

Miss Alice Watson 

Song by Convention. 
2:30 — Has the World Conquered the Church?. . .Mis9 Elsie Lee 

2:40 — Recitation Miss Gemnia Sutton 

2:50 — How to Become a Successful Sunday School Teacher 

S. A. Harris 

Song. 

3 :05 — Recitation Miss Frona Taylor 

3:15 — Cradle Roll Department Mrs. Pearl Ireland 

3 :25 — Address J. R. Boon 

Song. 

3 :35 — Address T. J. Gwyn 

Organization. 
Miscellaneous Business. 

Notice: — Be on time. Bring a well filled basket. Let's 
make the Convention a success. 

W. M. TAYLOR, President, 
R. A. THOMPSON, Sec.-Treas. 



charge. The reports included attendance, collection, 
lesson subject, the weather, and other information of 
interest. Also included were personal notes of weekly 
activities of the recording secretary, and other 
activities and interests of community members. A 
resolution of respect appears in the fall of 1909 
for "sister Missouri C. Jordan, wife of beloved Sun- 
day School Supt. J. M. Jordan," who died June 13, 
1909. Recognition is also given to John W. Faucette, 
a steward of Shiloh Church for twelve years, who died 
on Dec. 16, 1915. 

In 1936 J. C. Matkins served as Superintendent 
with Norman Herbin as assn't while W. L. Gilliam was 
Secretary. Teachers for the year were Mrs. L. G. 
Matkins, Norman Herbin, Mrs. J. N. Re id, Everette 
Lewis, and Mrs. C. L. Watlington. Sunday School rec- 
ords from 1949 name Everette Lewis as Superintendent, 
Robert Troxler, assn't., and George Walker as Secre- 
tary. Teachers were Mr.- H. R. Thomasson, L. G. Mat- 
kins, Florence Matkins, and Edith Lewis. 

Many other different individuals have served in 
these important positions, and although their names 
are not recorded here their importance to the growth 
and continuation of the Sunday School is not dimin- 
ished. It may be worthy to note that the first woman 
assistant superintendent to serve the Shiloh Sunday 



93 



School was Nancy Reid Gilliam in 1979, and the first 
woman Superintendent of Shiloh Sunday School was 
Havoline Troxler Gilliam in 1980. 



94 



5 
The Working Groups 



THE MUSIC 

From the first Sunday School minutes of April 6 , 
1884 (see Chapter Four, The Sunday School — Shiloh 
Sunday School ) , mention is made of the service being 
opened with singing. Though no record is known of mu- 
sic or song prior to this date, singing must certainly 
have played a part of worship services from even the 
earliest days of the Church. Charles Wesley, brother 
of John Wesley, was a prolific hymn writer. His works 
are well known even today, and are scattered through- 
out the present day Methodist Hymnal. 

The first known musical instrument used in Shi- 
loh Church was a pump organ, thought to have been 
first put into service in about 1901. This organ 
served the church for about twenty five years until 
1926 when a Mar sham and Wendell upright piano replaced 
it. The piano was first tuned on June 1, 1926. Ano- 
ther quarter century elapsed until 1953 when an elec- 
tric Wurlitzer Spinnet organ was placed into service 
and first played on Easter Sunday, April 6, 1953 by 
Mary S. Troxler. This organ was bought by the Woman's 
Society of Christian Service and the Willing Worker's 
Sunday School Class. On March 24, 1970 the Spinnet 



95 



organ was replaced with a Wurlitzer Church Model with 
chimes which is still in use today. On April 27, 1971 
a Wurlitzer piano was purchased for $820.00 to re- 
place the upright piano and complement the organ. 
This piano was used in the sanctuary until 1980 when 
the new fellowship hall was built. Shortly thereafter 
in 1981 a Wurlitzer piano was donated to Shiloh by 
Mrs . Leta Matkins in memory of her husband and former 
member of Shiloh, Worth Matkins. This piano is played 
today in the sanctuary for various portions of the 
Sunday School and worship services. 

The most finely tuned instrument has no value 
without the incentive to play it. Shiloh has been 
blessed through the years with many fine musicians. 
Iona Lewis (Allen) served as the first organist on the 
pump organ first used in 1901. She was followed by 
Ora Matkins Lewis and Ethel Gilliam Gerringer until 
about 1926 when the first piano was installed. Eva 
Lewis, Ora's daughter, then played on a continuing 
basis for several years . During the 1930 's and 1940' s 
several people combined to play as a pianist was needed. 
Some of those who played during these years were Bertha 
Herbin, Lona Mae Wicker, Helene Smith (Whitesell) , Ila 
Matkins (Terrell) , Mrs. M. C. Ellerbe, and for several 
years Edna Re id. In November, 1949 Mary Simpson Trox- 
ler began to serve as pianist, and has since that time 



96 



served full time as pianist-organist to present day. 
During these years she has been assisted regularly by 
Edna Re id, Havoline Gilliam, and Shirley Trull. 

Before the musical instruments were placed in 
Shiloh, the congregation was led in song by a direc- 
tor. When the organ was put into service and a choir 
group began to lead in singing, the director was still 
an integral part of the musical service. The earliest 
director of present memory was James Monroe Jordan who 
also served many years as Superintendent of the Sunday 
School. Jordan was succeeded after the first decade 
of the 1900' s by Lewis F. Troxler who directed the 
choir until the late 1920' s. Following Troxler as 
director was Mr. Ubert C. Smith and John Matkins. 
From around 1930 until about 1950 Mr. Ed Underwood 
directed the choir, and for a short time Ed Troxler 
also served as director . Since 1950 organist-pianist 
Mary S. Troxler has also assumed the duties of choir 
director, and began choir practice for the first time 
at Shiloh in 1951, being held on Wednesday nights at 
7:30 P.M. since that time. Mrs. Troxler also made the 
first choir robes, maroon with white detachable col- 
lars, in 1951. Another choir robe was introduced after 
several years which was purple with a reversible gold/ 
silver collar. In 1983 new gold-colored robes with 
reversible collars of the church liturgical colors 



97 



were donated by Mrs. Margaret Barber in honor of her 

deceased husband and former choir member Vernon J. 

Barber . 

At the turn of the century a choir was initiated 

and believed, as mentioned earlier, to have been led 

by James Monroe Jordan. As the years have passed many 

different individuals have served in the choir. Shi- 

loh has developed during that time many individuals 

and groups, in addition to the regular choir, who have 

blessed the church membership with their talent in 

song. Among some of the earliest choir members were 

the following: 

Tom Matkins Ora Matkins 

George Lewis Kermit Herb in 

Vena Lewis Norman Herb in 

Mary Lewis (Smith) Bertha G. Herb in 

Ubert C. Smith Jack Lewis 

Jim Lee Lewis Troxler 

John Matkins Lora Gilliam 

One of the early singing groups of Shiloh in 
addition to the choir section was a quartet composed 
of Lewis Troxler , Ubert C. Smith, Jim Lee, and George 
Lewis. This group was usually accompanied by Miss 
Eva Lewis or Ethel G. Ger ringer. 



98 



THE BOY SCOUTS 

On December 3, 1957 Shiloh Church registered 
with the Boy Scouts of America their sponsorship of 
Troop 142 of El on College, N.C. Under the leadership 
of Scoutmaster Zeb M. Whitehurst III and Samuel F. 
Lewis, Sr. the troop officially initiated operation 
in January 1958. Meetings - were held in the Church 
basement every first and third Wednesday night at 
7:00 P.M. and continued that year until December 10, 
1958 when Howard Troxler was named the new Scoutmaster. 

The Boy Scouts of America records as charter 
members on January 23, 1958 the following boys: 
Jerry F. Matkins, Tommy Thomas son, Pete Keck, Roger 
E. Keck, and Donnie Lewis. A total of 54 boys even- 
tually became members of Troop 142 at Shiloh and a 
total roster follows this section along with the dates 
of registration. At one time as many as seventeen 
scouts were actively participating, making quite a 
job for the adult leaders. Many memories linger of 
camping and hiking excursions both in district campo- 
ree functions and local trips. One of the favorite 
spots was directly behind (west of) the Scout Hut in 
a wooded area belonging to Frank Matkins. Convenience 
was obviously of importance, but the boys loved to 
roam these woods and learned many skills in camping, 
woodlore, and nature there. 



99 



Many former scouts and scouters today can recount the 
ghost tales by fireside, the ghost in the graveyard, 
the scoutmasters tent being slashed with knife by a 
night intruder, camping awards, food, poison oak, 
rainy nights in untrenched tents, and endless other 
experiences. All these memories bring back joy to 
those so fortunate to have been associated with the 
troop . 

Most of the experiences and training sessions 
of the scouts evolved from the Scout Hut (Illus. 1.6). 
Built in 1959 under the direction of Howard Troxler 
and Sam Lewis, the "Hut" served Troop 142 as its 
headquarters as long as the troop was active. Much 
of the labor in building the "Hut" was provided by 
the boys and adult leaders (see Chapter One, The 
Buildings — Other Building Appurtenances). 

Not all the memories, however, are quite so joy- 
ful. On the night of August 23, 1961 tragedy struck 
Troop 142,Shiloh Methodist Church, and the surround- 
ing community. Following a regularly scheduled troop 
meeting, two scouts, Gene Lewis and Clarence Wade, 
were riding double on a bicycle to the nearby store of 
Clarence's father when they were struck and killed by 
an intoxicated motorist who fled the scene of the 
accident. Fellow scouts served as honorary pall bear- 
ers (Illus. 5.1) during the double funeral which was 



100 



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101 



conducted in part by the Cherokee Council of the BSA. 
No event in the recorded history of Shiloh Church 
stands more tragic. The monument in their memory 
(Illus. 9.1) bears a replica of the Boy Scout Badge 
to which they both pledged their duty to God and 
Country. Amen. . . . 

Many nights of teaching and training were spent 
on behalf of the boys by several adult leaders. Scout- 
masters, merit badge counselors, board of review com- 
mittee members, and assistants molded and shaped the 
lives and character of these boys during their forma- 
tive years. Any boy who stayed long in the troop 
knows that in addition to knot tying, morse code, and 
other scouting skills, there lives within his heart a 
special place for those who gave of their time and 
talent to build a boy into a man. 

On April 1, 1969 Troop 142 was dissolved because 
of attrition, or lack of boys interested in scouting. 
It was again revived in January of 1971 with Rockie 
Troxler, an Eagle Scout of Troop 142 in prior years, 
as Scoutmaster , and Jerry Matkins , a charter member of 
the original troop, as assistant Scoutmaster. However, 
a lack of available members prohibited a continuation 
of the troop for very long and it was permanently dis- 
solved on April 1, 1972. 



102 



BOY SCOUT TROOP 142 LEADERS 



Scoutmasters 



Zeb M. Whitehurst, III 
Howard Troxler 
Paul Troxler 
Hulon Ger ringer 
Paul Troxler 
Howard Troxler 
Rockie Troxler 



Jan. 23, 1958— Dec. 10, 1958 

Dec. 10, 1958— Jan. 31, 1964 

Jan. 31, 1964— Jan. 31, 1966 

Jan. 31, 1966— Jan. 31, 1967 

Jan. 31, 1967— Jan. 31, 1968 

Jan. 31, 1968— Apr. 1 , 1969 

Jan. 31, 1971— Apr. 1 , 1972 



Assistant Scoutmasters 



Sam Lewis 
Edgar Peeples 
Paul Troxler 
Luthur Smith 
Edgar Peeples 
Jerry Matkins 



Jan. 23, 1958— Jan. 31, 1964 

Jan. 31, 1964— Jan. 31, 1966 

Jan. 31, 1966— Jan. 31, 1967 

Jan. 31, 1967— Jan. 31, 1968 

Jan. 31, 1968— Apr. 1, 1969 

Jan. 31, 1971— Apr. 1, 1972 



Vernon J. Barber 
Hulon Ger ringer 
Howard Gwynn 
Alvin Herb in 
Ervin Lewis 
Samuel F. Lewis 



Board Members 

L. F. Matkins 

W. F. Moore 

J. Edgar Peeples 

John L. Reid, Sr. 

Lacy Smith 

Luthur Smith 

J. Edward Troxler 



Paul Troxler 
Robert Troxler 
Rockie Troxler 
Howard Troxler 
Homer Walker 
Therwell Wrenn 



103 



BOY SCOUT TROOP 


142 MEMBERSHIP ROLL 




( cont . ) 






Scout's Name 


Date of Registration 


Clarence Long 


January 


31, 


1959 


James Long 


January 


31, 


1959 


Robert W. Long 


October 


7, 


1961 


Kenneth Maines 


August 




1966 


Jerry F. Matkins 


January 


23, 


1958 


Charles Moore 


August 


24, 


1959 


James Paschal 






1971 


Edgar H. Pritchett 


May 


27, 


1961 


John Lee Re id 


December 


1, 


1959 


Ronnie Smith 






1971 


Tommy Thomas son 


January 


23, 


1958 


Bobby Troxler 


August 




1966 


Craig Troxler 






1971 


Eddie Troxler 


June 




1965 


Larry D. Troxler 


November 


10, 


1960 


Mark Troxler 






1971 


Rockie D. Troxler 


June 


12, 


1958 


Scott Troxler 


December 




1964 


Clarence Wade 


August 


24, 


1959 


Doug Wade 


December 




1965 


Harold Wade 


June 


12, 


1958 


James K. Walker 


October 




1063 


William B. Walker 


October 


7, 


1961 



* Denotes Charter Member 

The date of registration noted above 
indicates the reported date but may not 
necessarily be the first day the boy joined. 



104 



BOY SCOUT TROOP 142 MEMBERSHIP ROLL 



Scout's Name 


Date of Registration 


Chris Barber 


October 




1963 


Doug Barber 


October 




1963 


Timothy Barber 






1971 


Bobby G. Brown 


January 


31, 


1962 


Tommy Brown 


February 




1965 


Marty Buckner 






1971 


Clem Calvin Chatham 


October 




1964 


John Cole 


December 


10, 


1958 


David Freeman 






1971 


Ricky Freeman 






1971 


Gary Gentry 


February 


3, 


1967 


Greg Gentry 






1971 


Ranee Ger ringer 


April 




1963 


Billy Gilliam 


July 


10, 


1958 


Jeff Gilliam 






1971 


Ralph Gilliam 


September 9, 


1964 


Steve Gilliam 


January 


31, 


1959 


Kenneth Gwynn 


April 




1964 


Roy R. Hall 


February 




1965 


Michael Herb in 






1971 


Edker Banks Howerton 


June 


12, 


1958 


Garland F. Howerton 


June 


12, 


1958 


Butch Johnson 


November 




1966 


Richard Jones 


July 


26, 


1960 


Jerry Keck 


August 




1963 


Pete Keck 


January 


23, 


1958 


Roger E. Keck 


January 


23, 


1958 


Donnie Lewis 


January 


23, 


1958 


Ervie Lewis 


July 


14, 


1960 


Gene Lewis 


October 


19, 


1960 


Sammy Lewis 


July 


14, 


1960 



Denotes Charter Member 



( cont . ) 



105 



THE METHODIST WOMEN 

The present Women's Division and United Methodist 
Women of the United Methodist Church are founded upon 
precepts established by several movements which pre- 
date the 1900 's. All of these movements had as a 
central theme the one uniting factor that still serves 
the Woman's Division today — missions. Missions has 
served the Methodist Women's purpose in a two-pronged 
outreach: home missions, and missions abroad. At 
the same time, Christian social relations and local 
church activities have spotlighted an endeavor to cre- 
ate a "full service" organization. 

Prior to 1940 there were six organizations of 
women's service in the three Methodist denominational 
divisions. 

1. Methodist Episcopal Church 

a. Woman's Home Missionary Society — organ. 
1880 to collect and disburse money, em- 
ploy missionaries, do work among neglect- 
ed populations in the home field. 

b. Woman's Foreign Missionary Society — org. 
1869 to send out and maintain female mis- 
sionaries among women in the foreign fields . 

c . Wesleyan Service Guild — a combined program 
of education for citizenship and social act. 



106 



d. Ladies Aid Society — to lend support to 
pastors' needs and local church programs, 
increase fellowship program of local 
church and relation of church to communi- 
ty needs. 

2. Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

a. Woman's Missionary Council — Org. 1910 
emphasis on social studies and social 
action in missions. 

3. Methodist Protestant Church 

a. Woman's Home Miss ionary Society — org. 1893 
race relations , minority groups , economics 

With 1939 came a unification of the three denomi- 
national divisions and "The Department of Christian 
Social Relations and Local Church Activities" was 
formed. A fear of "undercutting" missions funds in 
favor of local concerns seemed to linger among many, 
but decreased over the next few years as the women's 
movement unified even furthur. In September 1940 "The 
Woman's Society of Christian Service including the 
Wesleyan Service Guild" was formed as a means of deal- 
ing with the separate concerns of missions and local 
services . 

In May 1968 the union of the Methodist and The 
Evangelical United Brethren denominations also combined 



107 



the women's programs. The national group operated 
under the name of "Women's Division of the Board of 
Missions" as a part of the United Methodist Church. 
Three years later the Women's Division proposed a 
new organization to succeed the "Woman's Society of 
Christian Service and Wesleyan Service Guild" and it 
would be called "The United Methodist Women." As one 
of the seven divisions of the Board of Global Minis- 
tries , the United Methodist Women seek today to create 
new fellowship, and expand missions much like their 
predecessors of the previous century in the Woman's 
Home and Foreign Missionary Societies. 

SHILOH'S WOMEN'S GROUP 

During the pastorate of P^everend Loy V. Harris 
(1926-1931), the women of Shiloh formed the Women's 
Missionary Society of Shiloh M. E. Church under the 
leadership of Mrs. L. G. (Lydia) Matkins and Mrs. J. 
N. Reid. A report of the Women's Missionary Society 
of Shiloh Church was made to the Burlington Circuit 
Fourth Quarterly Conference on Oct. 6, 1928 and is 
duly registered here for its historic significance: 

"The Women's Missionary Society of Shiloh Church 
was organized July 14, 1928 with 21 members. There 
have been three additional members. 

We have held two meetings. There has been six 
visits to the sick and ten bunches of flowers and 
three trays sent. 



108 



We have $4.20 in treasury as dues. We also gave 
a supper to the Kiwanis Club of Reidsville, N. C. and 
expecting about $97.50 from this." 

Mrs. C. M. Waynick, Sec. 

On September 14, 1940 the minutes disclosed that 
the ladies group was referred to for the first time 
as The Woman's Society of Christian Service or WSCS. 
With nine persons attending at the home of Mrs. T. L. 
Matkins, "Sweet Hour of Prayer" was sung. The dues 
of these early years were 15c per month for each per- 
son and were used to support Paine College, Korean 
Kindergarten Schools, Emergency calls, Life Member- 
ships, the East Laurinburg Project, and various local 
projects and literature. Meetings were held in diff- 
erent member's homes, the Church, and the parsonage. 
For those who could not drive or had no means of trans- 
portation, Mrs. Annie Barker could be depended up- 
on as the "driver." 

In 1971 the women's group became known as the 
Shiloh United Methodist Women, a division of the Board 
of Global Ministries of the United Methodist Church. 
The group continued to serve the Church membership and 
community as it does today with a multitude of pro- 
jects and mission studies. Some of the more notable 
projects which the women's group have sponsored are: 
furnishing the pulpit furniture in 1953, making the 
Chrismon Tree decorations in 1979, and providing the 



109 



needlepoint altar rail kneeling pads in 1982. An 
ongoing tradition of the UMW, begun in 1970, is to 
place a rosebud on the pulpit lectern on the Sunday 
following a new birth in the community, in honor of 
the new arrival. One of the most anticipated func- 
tions in the Church calendar each year is the Christ- 
mas dinner and program sponsored by the Shiloh Meth- 
odist Women. This activity was initiated in Decem- 
ber of 1964 with the first supper being held at the 
home of Mrs. Howard Troxler. Two years later it was 
moved to the A-0 Community Center and continued there 
each Christmas until completion of the present fel- 
lowship hall in 1980. The dinner and program are 
now held there each Christmas, and during the evening 
Santa Claus has appeared each year to provide a sur- 
prise for the youngsters, and in some cases the 
not-so-youngsters . 



110 



THE YOUNG PEOPLE 

As Methodism spread throughout America, largely 
through the efforts of such stalwarts as Thomas Coke 
and Francis Asbury, a number of societies sprang up 
which were developed specifically for the purpose of 
promoting a religious attitude among the young. The 
Young People's Methodist Alliance, The Oxford League, 
The Young People's Christian League, and other young 
peoples' organizations united under one group in a 
historic conference in Cleveland, Ohio in May 1889, 
Upon mutual consent , one society merged for the entire 
Methodist Episcopal Church and was named the Epworth 
League. Though the name has changed, the purpose of 
the League has remained "to promote intelligent and 
loyal piety in the young members and friends of the 
Church; to aid them in the attainment of purity of 
heart and in constant growth in grace, and to train 
them in works of mercy and help." 

In the fall of 1922 a plea appeared in the Bur- 
lington Circuit Messenger that an Epworth League was 
needed at Shiloh in order to "help win the world for 
Christ." This plea by Mrs. Edd Lewis (Mary Apple 
Lewis) was realized when the first League program was 
conducted by Miss Ora Jones on October 9, 1922. Twen- 
ty-five persons united with the League at that time, 
but it did not remain active long. 



Ill 



The Epworth League reactivated later at Shiloh 
for a number of years. However, in December of 1941 
a merger of the youth groups of the Methodist Protes- 
tant Church, The Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
and the Methodist Episcopal Church officially took 
place. Hence, early in 1942, the Shiloh youth group 
became a part of the Methodist Youth Fellowship, or 
MYF. When, in 1968, all the Methodist Church branch- 
es were unified into the United Methodist Church, the 
youth program was renamed the United Methodist Youth 
Fellowship, or UMYF. 

A monthly publication entitled "The Burlington 
Circuit MYF News" was first published in 1946 by the 
Burlington Circuit of Methodist Churches. In the very 
first of these issues appeared the following article 
concerning Shiloh Church and the newsletter. 

Pastors Rev. J. S. Johnson 
Rev. Kenneth Thomas 

President Earl Danieley Burlington 
V. Pres. L. H. Faucette Circuit 
Sec'y. Billie Anne Tickle MYF Officers 

At a Burlington Circuit meet held at Shiloh on 
March 17, 1946 the following returning servicemen from 
Shiloh were honored: L. G. Matkins, Worth Matkins, 
Clarence Matkins, Coy Matkins, Fred Durham, Galloway 
Walker, Elmo Durham, Lacy Smith, Junior Easter, Sam 



112 



Lewis, Elmer Workman, Paul Troxler, Jack Lewis, Rob- 
ert Troxler, Robert Somers, Billie Bouldin. 

Gold Star Boys: Killed In Action — Hunter Jordan, 
Norris Matkins, Wilbert Troxler 

No matter what the name, the youth of Shi 1 oh 
Church have actively sought to pursue the initial plea 
of Mrs. Mary Lewis from the fall of 1922, "to help 
win the world for Christ." Through active meetings 
and special projects, and with the help of pastors 
and counselors, the young people of Shiloh continue 
today the tradition of participation, persistence, 
and patience. 



113 



VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 

Vacation Bible School originated at Shiloh around 
the mid 1940' s. Early teachers were Edna Re id, Lu- 
cille Reid , Margaret Moore, Mildred Ma tkins , Catharine 
Thomas son, and Margaret Smith (Barber). Illus. 5.2 
is a picture which was taken of one of the earliest 
Bible Schools on the front steps of Shiloh, circa 
1947. A young student at Duke University by the name 
of Jarvis Brown also helped Shiloh and other area 
churches with the VBS program. As the Bible School 
program grew at Shiloh, different age level classes 
were formed and more teachers were required. Music 
also played an important part, and students learned 
songs during the general assembly period, before 
classes began. 

Classes initially were held in the morning hours 
each day of Bible School week with a program held on 
Sunday to show what the students learned the previous 
week. For the past several years classes have been 
held in the evening hours. In 1980 the Methodist 
Men's Club furnished a hot dog supper on the fi- 
nal night, and it has become traditional each year for 
the Methodist Men to feed the VBS students and their 
parents. Various individuals contribute refreshment 
and snacks for break period on the other days during 
the VBS week. 



114 




Photo courtesy of Margaret Barber 




Photo courtesy of Lucille Reid 

ILLUS. 5.2 Vacation Bible School 1947 



115 



THE METHODIST MEN 



On January 28, 1961 a group of men from Shiloh 
Church met at Paul ' s Restaurant for the purpose of 
organizing a Methodist Men's Club Unlike the Women's 
Methodist Societies, no organized movement on the part 
of the Methodist Church had been promoted in earlier 
days. Any organized effort to create a men's group 
was left for each church to pursue. With the help of 
Reverend Charles C. Clark, the men of Shiloh Church 
organized an active fellowship of Methodist Men from 
this first meeting in 1961. The first called meeting 
for regular monthly attendance was held at the Shiloh 
Scout Hut on September 18, 1961. Declared as Charter 
Night, all members who were present at the original 
meeting signed as charter members. The charter mem- 
bers of Shiloh Methodist Men are as follows: 



Clarence Matkins 

Everette Lewis 

Paul Troxler 

Hulon R. Thomas son 

Alvin Herb in 

Billy R. Bouldin 

Frank Matkins 

Ralph Somers 

Robert Troxler 

Charles C. Clark (Rev.) 



Therwell Wrenn 

Joe Matkins 

Ervin Lewis 

David Moore 

C. M. Martindale 

Howard Troxler 

Hulon Ger ringer 

J. Edgar Peeples 

Samuel F. Lewis 

W. F. Moore 



116 



Officers elected at the first Methodist Men's meeting: 
President Everette Lewis 

Vice President Clarence Matkins 
Treasurer Alvin Herb in 

Secretary Edgar Peeples 

Reporter Robert Troxler 

From the outset, though not declared officially, 
one of the goals of the Men's Club was to keep an on- 
going sequence of projects as an incentive to meet and 
to share in the responsibilities in and around the 
Church. The first such project of record was sug- 
gested at the September Charter Night meeting to sow 
grass around the Scout Hut. Other projects which 
have stimulated interest and given the men added re- 
sponsibility at Shiloh, range from the very simple 
to major action. Ideas are projected to provide not 
only financial contributions, but physical, hands-on 
schemes as well. Some of those worthwhile projects 
are listed below. 

Night light at back of church (cont.) Nov. '61 

Scout Hut heaters ($74.11) Dec. * 61 

Cemetery Sign concerning plots (Joe Matkins) Jul. '62 
Rocks placed on Church drive (periodic) 

Purchased Parsonage property ($2,310.00) Apr. '63 



117 



General grounds upkeep (periodic) 

Rear fire escapes ($150 Howard Troxler) Sep. '74 
Sponsor N. C. Youth Ministry (periodic) 

Church Road Sign Jun. '77 

Paint Scout Hut ($145) Oct. '79 
Family in need (periodic cash donations) 

VBS picnic supper (continuing) Jun. '80 

Ceiling insulation over Sanctuary ($516.80) Mar. '81 

Sponsor Christian Children's Fund (cont.) May '81 

Storm windows at parsonage ($343.04) May '81 

Screen fence behind Church at A/C ($78.92) May '81 

Recording tapes for home sermons ($45.50) Jan. '82 

Church fire extinguishers ($100.06) Apr. '82 

Parsonage heating and air cond. ($300.00) Apr. '82 

Pump house repairs ($144.90 0. B. Whitesell) May '82 

Front vestibule doors ( $435 . 76 Paul Troxler ) Jun . ' 83 

"The way to a man's heart is through his stomach," 
or as former Methodist Men's President Billy Bouldin 

so aptly and concisely stated, "no eat no meet." 

By any evaluation, the color of this horse remains 
the same. The Shiloh Methodist Men's Club has, from 
the beginning, provided, or had provided, a meal at 
nearly every meeting. Quite obvious at the no-meal - 
meetings, was that low attendance and lack of inter- 
est would be predominant. When the group first formed 
many meetings were held in restaurants, but a trend 



118 



developed of meals being prepared by the members. 
Soon each group laid claim to its own "carte du jour" 
and month to serve. Of course, wives, sisters, moth- 
ers, and aunts of the hosts, as well as other ladies 
of the church, more often than not, were responsi- 
ble for the food preparation. As this personal 
touch became the prevailing order, meetings were held 
in either the Scout Hut or the home of one of the 
hosts. When the fellowship hall was built in 1980, 
all meetings were then gradually moved there. With 
an average attendance of about twenty people, the con- 
venience of the Church facilities became obvious , but 
many will never forget the atmosphere of fellowship 
shared as they met together in a member's home, no 
matter how crowded or inconvenient for the host. 

On August 20, 1962 the group decided to host 
their families at Troxler's Lake for an outing at the 
picnic tables. This tradition has continued every 
year and still is cherished as one of the highlights 
of the year. Another custom was begun on December 
17 of that same year. The Methodist Men hosted their 
wives or invited guests for a Christmas dinner. This 
month was later changed to November in order not to 
conflict with the many scheduled Christmas functions 
of others, and is today reserved for the third Sun- 
day night in November. 



119 



6 
The Pastors 

SERVANTS OF GOD 

"And when the chief Shepherd is manifested you 
will obtain the unfading Crown of Glory." 

—I Peter 5:4 

Such is the promise for those hardy souls who 
dare accept the challenge proffered for a lifetime of 
dedication to tending the flock of God. Perhaps no 
example of the rigors of an early Methodist preacher 
is as vivid as the description of Alex E. Gibson in 
Crowned Victors by Rev. J. W. Hedges. 

"There were rugged men in the early years of 
Methodism, and the field they occupied was one 
of restless conflict. Only those of great pow- 
ers of endurance could long remain in the ranks 
of the itinerancy, and often men of vigorous 
constitutions broke down in the exacting duties 
laid upon them." 

We speak here, of course, of the "circuit rider." 
On horseback they traversed dense forests, forded 
swollen streams, and braved the numbing cold and stif- 
ling heat. Bishop Francis Asbury paved the way, in 
logging enough miles in his lifetime to have journey- 
ed around the Earth no less than five times. Asbury 
averaged one sermon or exhortation for every day of 



120 



his ministry and traveled to North Carolina each year. 
The early preacher often, if not continually, preach- 
ed to the illiterate, those who knew little of the 
Bible. He was often not well received, nor welcome. 
His library of the Bible, Hymn Book, and Discipline 
was among those articles which he carried in his sad- 
dlebags. However, these brave and noble servants were 
we 1 1 compensated for their efforts with an "allowance" 
of $64.00 per year for preacher , elder , or bishop. Of 
course, presents and donations from families were 
deducted. 

The early circuit riders were responsible for 
vast areas including several camp meeting grounds and 
church institutions . Because they were spread so thin, 
these preachers sometimes would only visit twice a 
year or less. Some of the circuit preachers were 
fortunate enough to be aided by local preachers who 
lived close by, and could serve a particular church or 
community on a regular basis. Shiloh Church was bene- 
fitted in just this way. From its inception Shiloh 
was led by Reverend William Matkins as a local preacher 
or lay elder (see Chapter Three, The Church — William 
Matkins). The Methodist Church flourished and grew 
dramatically prior to 1800, but was stalemated in 
growth between 1800 and 1820. Since Shiloh was formed 
during this period of time , and continued with distinc- 



121 



tion, its effectiveness and well-to-do could have been 
due in large part to the efforts of local preacher 
William Matkins. Although the early pastors were nor- 
mally assigned to a new circuit each year, the local 
pastor never had to move. William Matkins served 
Shiloh on the local level for forty years, but although 
he apparently was not formally ordained into the Metho- 
dist Church, he was, as founder and charter member, 
the predominant pastor during that period of time. 

In order to determine the names of the early pas- 
tors, especially those who pre-date local memory and 
records, we must rely upon the resources available from 
the Methodist Annual Conferences. Providing the cir- 
cuit in which a church is located is known or can be 
found, the respective pastor can also be determined 
using these Methodist Journals. A detailed account 
of how the circuit in which Shiloh has been a member 
can be determined is expl ained in Chapter Seven, The 
Conference. Also in the Chapter is a table which 
lists all the pastors of Shiloh for every year from 
1814 to 1984 with the exception of 1866. 

Recording a complete life history of every pastor 
that has served Shiloh would prove to be impossible. In 
fact it is only through the Conference Journals that we 
may obtain a brief biographical sketch of even a few of 
the earlier preachers. For those preachers that we do 
know of, the following section is devoted to them. 



122 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PASTORS 

Thomas R. Brame (Oct. 1, 1796-Jan. 13, 1848). Served 
Shiloh 1832. Born in Mecklenberg County, Va. 
Converted Nov. 1817. Admitted to Va. Conference 
in travelling connection Feb. 1820. Last years 
of life full of bodily affliction, superannuated. 

John A. Miller (Mar. 9, 1799-1849). Served Shiloh 
in 1838. Son of Armstead and Susannah Redd. Born 
Prince Edward County, Va. Parents were baptists. 
Converted 1823. Traveled Mecklenberg Circuit, 
Bedford Circuit, Amherst Circuit, Orange Circuit. 
Ordained deacon 1829, elder 1831. Superannuated 
1840. 

William W. Nesbitt (Oct. 4, 1812-Nov. 2, 1856). Served 
Shiloh 1843. Born in Catawba County, N. C. Con- 
verted 1832. Joined N. C. Conference 1840. Was 
an itinerant minister 14 years from the mountains 
to the seaboard. Health failed in 1855 at the 
Mattamuskeet Circuit, required supernumary relation. 

Washington Sandford Chaff in (Feb. 8, 1815-Nov. 9,1895). 
Served Shiloh in 1849. First wife Eliza Whitehurst, 
married 1846. Second wife Sarah Abbie Smith, mar- 
ried 1857. Joined M. E. Church 1836 at Mount Zion. 
Licensed to preach 1840. Admitted on trial N. C. 
Conference 1840. Ordained deacon 1842, elder 1844. 
Served following circuits: Straits, Bath, Jones- 
vil 1 e , Randol ph , Portsmouth , Mattamuskeet , Tarboro , 
Trent, Franklinsville, Snow Hill, Topsail, White- 
ville, New Berne mission, N.H. &0. mission, Buck- 
horn, Deep River, Williamston, Granville, Cape 
Fear, Robeson, Elizabeth, Snow Hill , Cumberland, 
Buckhorn, Drowning Creek mission, South Fork, White 
Sulphur Springs mission, Lillington, Ashpole mis- 
sion, Rockingham, Lumber ton, Cape Fear, Deep Riv- 
er, and Cape Fear. Itinerant preacher for 52 years 
without cessation. 



123 



John W. Tinnin (July 28, 1817-April 10, 1865). Served 
Shiloh in 1850. Licensed to preach May 1841. 
Received on trial N.C. Conference 1841. Served 
circuits of Randolph, Neuse, Mocksville, Duplin, 
Snow Hill, Franklinsville, Pittsboro, Deep River, 
Fayettevi lie, Raleigh, Haw River, Cape Fear, Hills- 
boro, Cape Fear, Pittsboro, Fayetteville, HawRiver. 
Died in Pittsboro of Typhoid fever. 

Thomas C. Moses (180 7 -December 20, 1891). Served 
Shiloh in 1851. Married Sally Moore. Admitted on 
trial N.C. Conference 1844 in Pittsboro. Traveled 
nine years, health failed, superannuated, regained 
health, worked again until 1876, again superannuated 
until his death in Chatham County, N. C. 

Alexander Gattis (1819-May 1859). Served Shiloh both 
in 1853 and 1858. Joined N.C. Conference in 1846. 
Born in Orange County, N. C. and died in Chapel 
Hill, N. C. 

Charles H. Phillips (December 27, 1814-May 19, 1885). 
Served Shiloh in 1859 and 1860. Married Lizzie 
Skeen in 1853. Joined M. E. Church 1841. Admitted 
on trial N. C. Conference 1850. Ordained deacon 
1852, elder 1854. Served the following circuits: 
Fayettevill, Guilford, Alamance, and others until 
1885. 

Alfred Norman (April 22, 1804-Aug. 20, 1873). Served 
Shiloh 1867-1872. Married Mary L. Rucker 1843. 
United with M. E. Church at age of 19 in 1823. 
Joined Va. Conference in 1828. Served Portsmouth 
and Ocracoke, Black River, Trent, Stokes, Randolph, 
Camden, and Gates. At the separation of the Va. 
Conference in 1837 he remained in the Carolina 
Division and served Tarboro, Duplin, Guilford, 
Raleigh, Chatham, Franklin, Va. , Caswell, Patrick, 



124 



Davidson, Tar River, Stokes, Franklin, Va. , Pitt- 
sylvania, Granville, Halifax, Va. , Wentworth, Leas- 
burg (stricken with paralysis), health improved, 
resumed in 1867 on Alamance Circuit, appointed in 
1869 to HighRock mission until health again failed. 

John Wesley Jenkins (May 4, 1832- July 4, 1906. Served 
Shiloh in 1876. Married in order (1) Lucy T. 
Williford; (2) Mary Alice Thaxton; (3) Bettie W. 
Garrett; (4) Mattie Virginia Atwater. Admitted on 
trial N.C. Conference 1858. Served these circuits : 
Plymouth, Tarboro, Rocky Mount, Warrenton, Chapel 
Hil 1 , Beaufort , Leasburg , Yanceyville, Rockingham, 
Lincolnton, Snow Hill, Lenoir, Youngsville, Warren- 
ton, Ridgeway, Durham, Cary, Smithfield, and Supt. 
of the Methodist orphanage. 

Lemuel H. Gibbons (Aug. 26, 1844- June 11,1885). 
Served Shiloh from 1877-1881. Son of Methodist 
preacher Rev. H. H. Gibbons of N. C. Conference. 
Gave himself to God when 9 years old. Entered war 
at eighteen. Licensed to preach 1869. Joined 
N. C. Conference 1870. Served Carthage, Yancey- 
ville, Oxford, and Haw River Circuits. 

Van Bur en A. Sharpe (June 12, 1834-Dec. 21, 1894) 
Served Shiloh from 1881-1884. Son of John and 
Catherine. Married Ann McDarid Oct. 1860. Became 
church member as a boy. Joined S. C. Conference 
1857 (part of N. C). Served Laurens Circuit as 
a Jr. preacher, then the following circuits: 
Pickensville, Spartanburg, Rutherford, Lincolnton, 
agent for Trinity Col lege , Rockingham, Yanceyvil le , 
Trinity College District, Haw River, Granville. 
Was Trustee of Trinity College 8 years. Elected 
delegate to General Conference at St. Louis 1889. 



125 



Daniel Luthur Earnhardt (Apr. 22, 1854-Dec. 13, 1928) 
Served Shiloh 1890 and 1891. Son of Silas and 
Caroline Goodman. Married Helen Frances Ayers on 
Feb. 4, 1877 and reared twelve children. Born of 
Lutheran parentage, joined church in 1876. United 
with M. E. Church, South 1878. Licensed to preach 
Feb. 1878. Joined N. C. Conference 1878. Ordained 
deacon 1880, elder 1883. Served the following 
circuits: Salisbury, Concord, Davie, Davidson, 
South Fork, Lea sburg, Burlington, Mt. Tirzah, Snow 
Hil 1 , Jonesboro , Ridgeway , Fremont, Camden, Garys- 
burg,Rich Square, Conway, Chadbourn, Clinton, and 
Plymouth. 

John Edmund Underwood (Oct. 24, 1854-Apr. 8, 1924) 
Served Shiloh 1891 and 1892. Son of Isaiah H. and 
Mary C. Married Sarah Ella Allen first, who died 
1888, then Fannie Clark Lentz on July 30, 1890. 
Admitted to the N.C. Conference 1883. Served the 
following circuits: Big Lick mission, Granville, 
Mt. Tirzah, Burlington, Rocky Mount, Washington, 
Warrenton, Elizabeth City District, Rockingham, 
Warrenton, New Bern, Raleigh, St. John, and Gibson. 

Allison Lee Ormond (Sept. 9, 1862-Feb. 17, 1927). 
Served Shiloh 1892 and 1893. Son of John J. and 
Nancy. Married Ella Kirby Crawford Feb. 16, 1892. 
Brother Reverend J. M. Ormond on faculty at Duke 
University Education. Joined N. C. Conference in 
1892. Served these circuits: Burlington, Craven, 
Goldsboro, Smithfield, Cary, Tar River, Kenly, 
Fayetteville, Wilmington Fifth Ave., Nashville, 
and Oxford. 

James Marshall Rice (Nov. 16, 1862-May 30, 1904) 
Born in Caswell County. Grew up in and attended 
Camp Springs Church and Sunday School . Married 
Mamie E. Mattock 1894. Attended Trinity College. 
Served at Shiloh from 1894-1897. Admitted on 



126 



trial to the Western N. C. Conference in 1890. 

Served Redies River mission, Sparta circuit, 

Creston circuit, and Mt. Airy circuit. Ordained 

deacon 1892, elder 1894. Transferred to N. C. 

Conference 1894 and served Burlington circuit, 
Granville circuit, and Warren circuit. 

R. Frank Taylor (June 13, 1862- June 10, 1936). Served 
Shiloh from 1897-1899. Son of Richard B. and 
Margaret Kornegay. Married Ada Harrell 1884 for 
37 years. Second wife, Julia Thompson Carter. 
Third wife Lucy Hamilton 1931. Attended Kinston 
Collegiate Institute. Served the following 
charges or circuits: Bethel, Greenville, Fair 
Bluff , Brunswick, Spring Hope, Ocracoke and Ports- 
mouth, Burlington, Yanceyville, Leasburg, Battle- 
boro and Whitakers, Hooker town, Mt. Olive, Jenkins 
Memorial and Apex, Four Oaks, Rosemary, Epworth 
(Raleigh), Goldston, Duke, Fayetteville, Stedmon, 
Roper, Vanceboro, Aulander, Chowan, Glendon, and 
Aulander. Superannuated 1933. Appointed 1934 
to serve Ocracoke -Portsmouth charge but only was 
able to serve 3 months because of poor health. 

James Townsend Stanford (Sept. 26, 1871 -Oct. 13, 1946) 
Served Shiloh from 1899-1902. Son of Richard and 
Louise Townsend. Married Blanche Fly the. Burl- 
ington Academy, Trinity College, Vanderbilt Div. 
School. Earned varsity football letter from 
Trinity 1892. Joined N. C. Conference 1899. 
Served Burlington Circuit, Rich Square, Roanoke 
Rapids, Scitshill , Maysville, Williamston, Benson, 
Yanceyville, Windfall, Oriental, Ahoskie, Gate 
Station, Leasburg, Pinetops, Lake Landing, Roper, 
Tyner. Retired 1941. 



127 



Samuel Freeman Nicks (Jan. 21, 1874-Oct. 28, 1946) 
Served Shiloh from 1903-1907. Married Emma Woods. 
Graduated Trinity College 1903. Served the follow- 
ing charges and circuits: Burlington, Burlington 
circuit, Pelham, Milton, Yanceyville, Leasburg, 
Hillsboro, Brooksdale, Cedar Grove. Retired in 
Hillsboro. Son, Robert, also served Shiloh Church 
from 1947-1950. Preached last sermon on Aug. 18, 
1946 at Shiloh based on "Phil. 1:21". 

Charles 0. Pur ant (Sept. 6, 1858-Mar. 13,1919) Served 
Shiloh from 1907-1913. Married Miss Edgerton in 
1891. Attended Trinity College. Licensed to 
preach at age 23. Received on trial N.C. Confer- 
ence 1882. Served Point Caswell mission, Randolph 
Circuit, Pekin Circuit, Youngsville Circuit, Ral- 
eigh-Brooklyn, Warren Circuit, Halifax, Currituck, 
South Creek, Craven, Hamlet, Richmond Circuit, 
Golds ton, Burlington Circuit, Newport, Goldsboro, 
and Snow Hil 1 . 

Frank Bascum Noblitt (Aug. 3, 1869-July 13, 1965) 
Served Shiloh in 1914 and 1915. Son of Thomas and 
Sarah. First wife Lucy Ownby married 1905. Second 
wife Lucy Russell married 1924. Attended Weaver - 
ville College, Trinity College, and Vanderbilt 
University. Joined Western N. C. Conference 1904. 
Ordained deacon 1904, elder 1908. Transferred to 
N. C. Conference. Served the following circuits 
and charges: Laurel Hill, Elizabethtown, Youngs- 
ville, Currituck Circuit, North Alamance, Burling- 
ton, Dover Circuit , Paml ico Circuit, Craven, Gran- 
ville, Vass, Montgomery, Ingold, Lumberton, Glen- 
don, Hemp. Retired 1934. 

William Franklin Galloway (Mar. 12,1860-Sep. 17,1931) 
Served Shiloh 1915-1919. Son of John and Laura 
Robinson. Married Lucy H. Ross on Oct. 14, 1886. 



128 



Attended Yadkin College. Joined N. C. Confer- 
ence at Greensboro 1889. Served Kenly, Aurora, 
(sick 1892), Cape Fear, Newton Grove, (Evangelistic 
work 1900-03) , Hatteras, Bath, Farmville, Dover, 
Hobgood , Roanoke Rapids, South Alamance, Burlington 
Circuit. Died in Burlington, N. C. at home. Fun- 
eral at Front Street Methodist Church. 

Dwight A. Petty (Mar. 5, 1889- June 19, 1971) Served 
Shiloh from 1920-1922. Son of Isaac Newton and 
Catherine Brown. Married Pearl griffin on Oct. 1, 
1918. Finished Trinity College 1918. Joined N.C. 
Conference in Dec. 1918. Also attended Yale Div. 
School, received B.D. degree 1927. Served Bahama 
Circuit, Burlington Circuit, Piedmont Circuit at 
East Rockingham, Clark Street at Rocky Mount, 
Williams ton, Swepsonville, Halifax, Erwin, Stan- 
tonsburg, and Rose Hill. While on Burlington 
Circuit in 1921 and 1922 edited "Burlington Cir- 
cuit Messenger". 

William Robert Hardesty (Dec. 20, 1889-May 24, 1937) 
Served Shiloh in 1923 and 1924. Married Bertha 
Malloy Curris. Attended Elon College. Admitted 
to N. C. Conference on trial 1917. Served Atlantic 
Charge , Wanchese , Currituck , Burl ington Circuit , 
Grimesland, Fairfield, Robersonville, Shallotte. 

Ernest Golden Overton (Apr. 27, 1900-Nov. 13, 1944) 
Served Shiloh 1924 and 1925. Born in Aurora, N.C. 
Joined N. C. Conference in 1924 in Wilmington, 
N. C. Served as chaplain in WWII. Lost his life 
in service of his country and his God in England 
where he was buried. 

Loy Vernon Harris (May 2, 1899- June 13, 1946) Served 
Shiloh 1927-1931. Son of G. C. and Annie Ferrell. 
Married Elizabeth Lass iter Brookshire June 30, 
1924. 



129 



Attended Trinity College and Duke Divinity School. 
Joined N. C. Conference in 1924. Served Webb Ave. 
in Burlington, Burlington Circuit, Scotland Neck, 
chaplain for C.C. Camps in N.C., Main St. in High 
Point, Conway, Ahoskie, Whiteville, and chaplain 
in WWII with honorable discharge in 1945. 

Hicks Edward Lance (Nov. 26, 1873-Mar. 21, 1964) 
Served Shiloh 1931-1935. Son of John Riley and 
Sophronia Chambers. Married Helen Earnhardt 1909. 
Joined N.C. Conference in New Bern 1906. Ordained 
deacon 1907, elder 1912. Attended Weaver College 
and Trinity College. Served Stanhope, Pine tops, 
Fairfield, Stantonsburg , Farmville, Roseboro, Hemp, 
Elizabethtown, Mt. Tirzah, Milton, Burlington Cir- 
cuit, and Youngsville. 

Leslie Leamon Parrish (Jan. 8, 1901 -Apr. 14, 1965) 
Served Shiloh from 1935-1939. Called to the min- 
istry at age 26. Attended Washington Collegiate 
Institute and Duke University. Admitted to N. C. 
Conference on trial 1937. Served Carrboro, Bur- 
lington Circuit, West Burlington, Jonesboro, Jack- 
sonville, Fifth Ave. Wilmington, Rosemary, Roanoke 
Rapids, Mebane. Married Stella Gladys McGuinn 
on March 27, 1917. 

Carl Anderson Johnson (May 16, 1918-Dec. 25, 1960) 
Served Shiloh from 1943-1945. Son of Carl and 
Margaret Dorsey. Married Sally Crisp on Nov. 1942. 
His father , Carl , was also a Methodist pastor. He 
attended Louisburg College, Wofford College, Duke 
Divinity School. Joined N. C. Conference 1944. 
Ordained deacon 1944, elder 1946. Served Burling- 
ton Circuit, Siler City Circuit, South Mills, Cor- 
dova, Aberdeen, Carr Church. He led the people of 
Camp Springs Church on the Burlington Circuit in 
building a new church. 



130 



Robert Lee Nicks (Mar. 16, 1916- ) Served 
Shiloh from 1947-1950. Son of Reverend Samuel F. 
Nicks, who also served at Shiloh from 1903-1907. 
Married Lou Price on December 27, 1943. Born on 
March 16, 1916 in Yanceyville, N. C. Received 
A. B. degree from Duke University in 1937 and a B.D. 
degree from Duke Divinity School in 1947. Ordained 
deacon in 1948, also elder in 1948. Served the 
Burlington Circuit, Bahama, Trinity — Burlington, 
Methodist Home for Children (Superintendent) in 
Raleigh, Grace Church in Wilmington, Calvary in 
Smithfield. Now serving as volunteer visitor as 
a retired minister for Ann Street United Methodist 
Church in Beaufort. 

Harley Archie Chester (Jan. 28, 1900-Apr. 6, 1953) 
Served Shiloh from 1950-1953. Son of James T. 
and Adelaide Victoria. Married Edith Morrison on 
July 12, 1925. Joined the First Methodist Church 
in Hickory, N. C. at age 9. Admitted to N. C. 
Conference in 1925. Attended school at Rutherford 
College and Lenoir Rhyne College. Ordained deacon 
in 1927, elder 1929. Served Chowan, Roper, Whit- 
akers, Mattamuskeet, Garysburg, Millbrook, Benson, 
Carthage, Branson, Durham, Mr. Olive Circuit, 
Bahama, and Burlington Circuit. Funeral held at 
Shiloh with Rev. L. M. Hall giving the tribute on 
the "Carpenter's Son." 

Paul C. Browning (August 28, 1923- ) 

Served Shiloh from 1954-1956. Born in Charleston, 
W. Va. Married wife Winifred May 5, 1945. Received 
B.A. University of Charleston, W. Va. and M. Div. 
and B. D. Duke University. Ordained deacon 1953, 
elder 1956. Served Wrightsville Beach at Fairmont, 
Long Memorial at Roxboro, Trinity Jacksonville, 
Trinity Wilmington, First Church Morehead City, and 
Burlington Circuit. Also served as Nursing Home 



131 



Administrator in the following States; North Car- 
ol ina , Virginia , New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Mary- 
land at present. 

John Everette Wood (Nov. 26, 1919- ) 

Served Shiloh from 1957-1960. Born in Roanoke 
Rapids, N. C. Married Fleeta Clary on Nov. 29, 
1944. Attended Louisburg College, Atlantic Chris- 
tian College, Duke University, and received Ph.D. 
at the University of Missouri. Ordained as deacon 
1955 and elder 1957. Served Nash Circuit, Middle- 
burg Circuit, Louisburg Circuit, Burlington Cir- 
cuit, Bethlehem — Shady Grove, Bridge ton Circuit, 
Trenton, Jefferson (Goldsboro), Popular Springs — 
Trinity Vance, Northampton, West End, St. John's — 
Gibson. On disability leave since 1977. 

Roger E. Thompson (Sept. 4, 1934- ) 

Served Shiloh 1960,1961. Born in Richmond County. 
Married Roberta Altman on June 22, 1958. Received 
A. A. degree Spartanburg Methodist College, B. S. 
degree East Carolina University, and Master of 
Div. Duke University. Served Grimes land, Shiloh, 
Center -Cameron, Siler City Circuit, Gardner's in 
Fayetteville, Stedman, Pee Dee, Calvary, Smyrna 
in Robbins, Concord in Roxboro, and Northampton. 
Transferred to S.C. Conference and served Shiloh 
and Pond Branch. 



132 



William L. Maness (April 1, 1890- ) 

Served Shiloh from Jan. to June in 1963 after 
the early departure of Rev. C. C. Clark because 
of health reasons. Born in Moore County, N. C. 
Married wife Beaulah on May 1, 1913. Educated 
at Elon College and Emory University. Ordained 
deacon 1913, elder 1915. Served Erwin, Parkton, 
Fayetteville, Siler City , Roxboro , Snow Hill, Yan- 
ceyville, Jackson, Gibson, Hillsborough, Elm City, 
and retired to Siler City in 1956, Called from re- 
tirement to serve several churches including Shi- 
loh. Presently residing at Methodist Retirement 
Home in Durham, N. C. 

Wasena F. Wright , Jr. (Sept. 3, 1940- ) 
Served Shiloh from 1963-1965. Born in Danville, 
Va. Married Patricia Greer on July 29, 1961. 
Received A. A. degree Ferrum College, B.A. degree 
Randolph — Macon College, attended Duke Divinity 
School , Master of Div. Union Theological Seminary, 
Doctor of Ministry St. Mary's Seminary. Ordained 
deacon 1965, elder 1970. Served Ashland Circuit, 
Shiloh, Epworth (Rickmond, Va.), Associate at 
Ginter Park (Richmond, Va.), Calvary (Stuarts 
Draft, Va.), Senior Minister at Mount Vernon (Dan- 
ville, Va.) presently. 

Shirley Judge Starnes (October 3, 1893-June 16, 1982) 
Served Shiloh longer than any pastor — from 1966 
until 1977. Born at Fort Mill,S.C. Son of William 
B. and Mollie Threatt. Attended Duke University 
and Duke Divinity School. Married Daisy Brantley, 
who on Sept. 18, 1966 died during the Sunday Morn- 
ing worship service which her own husband was lead- 
ing at Shiloh. Served 14 appointments in theN.C. 
Conference and in 1960 was elected Editor of the 
N. C. Christian Advocate which he served as for six 
years. Delegate to the World Methodist Conference 
in Oslo, Norway 1961. 



133 



Charles M. Hackett (July 13, 1934- ) 

Served Shiloh from 1977-1981. Born in Boston, 
Mass. Married wife June on Sept. 22, 1957. 
Received B. B. A. Univ. of Massachusetts and a 
Master of Div. at Duke Univ. Also attended Univ. 
of Al abama , Maryl and Univ., Univ. of Virginia, and 
C. W. Post College. Ordained deacon 1976, elder 
1978. Veteran of the Korean and Vietnam Wars. 
Served Merritts — Ebenezer, New Sharon, Shiloh, 
Fayetteville: Johnson Memorial, Pilmoor Memorial, 
Goldsboro: Jefferson. 

Randy L. Wall (August 4, 1953- ) 

Presently serves Shiloh. Born in Burlington, N.C. 
Married to Donna Blalock on August 4, 1974. Received 
B. A. degree Methodist College in Fayetteville, 
N. C. , and Master of Div. degree at Duke Univer- 
sity. Joined Grace United Methodist Church in 
Burlington, N. C. Licensed to preach 1972, or- 
dained deacon 1976, elder 1980. Served Turkey- 
Friendship Charge, Andrews — Soapstone Charge, 
Bell Arthur Church, and Shiloh. 



134 



7 
The Conference 



ORGANIZATION 

One of the strong characteristics of the Metho- 
dist Church, which may be partly responsible for its 
stable and lasting influence, is its order or organi- 
zation. From the founding of the Methodist Societies 
in America, evolved a system of circuits that trans- 
formed into conferences, districts, and circuits in 
which the preachers received their appointments. The 
North Carol ina area from which Shil oh Methodist Church 
originated was under the jurisdiction of the Virginia 
Annual Conference. Although a paucity of information 
hampers efforts to determine furthur the district from 
which Shiloh originally was situated, a safe assump- 
tion, due to geographical considerations, would place 
Shiloh in the Caswell Circuit. If the proper district 
or circuit in which a Church was placed can be deter- 
mined, then the pastoral appointment can also be un- 
covered by reference to the "Methodist Episcopal Church 
Annual Conference Journal" (1773-1844) and the "Metho- 
dist Church N. C. Conference, S. E. Journal" (1845- 
1984). Hence, we may determine the pastors assigned 
to Shiloh using these references coupled with other 
bits and pieces of information which define the appro- 
priate district or circuit. 



135 



Daring the Virginia Annual Conference of 1836, 
the North Carolina Annual Conference was formed and 
in 1837 met of its own accord. According to Reverend 
James M. Rice in a report on July 20, 1895 in the 
"Methodist Church Papers: Historical Sketches of 
Circuits" Shiloh Church was located in the Orange 
Circuit along with Prospect Church and Camp Springs of 
Caswell County and Bethel Methodist Church of Orange 
County (later Alamance County). Shiloh remained in 
the Orange Circuit until 1849 when it joined the 
Franklinsville Circuit. "The Quarterly Conference 
Minutes of the Franklinsville Circuit" also included 
the following charges: Franklinsville, Cedarfalls, 
Union, Bethlehem, Huttons, Randolph, Bethany, Rocky 
River, Macedonia, Browns, Salem, Piliser, and Cobles. 
Were it not for the unquestionable identification of 
Shiloh representatives, one might challenge this cir- 
cuit appointment because of the awkward geographical 
pi acement . 

Sometimes information can be misleading or con- 
fusing. Such is the case of an Orange Circuit refer- 
red to in "Histories of Methodist Churches in Alamance 
County." From this reference "Shi low" Church is listed 
as a member of the Orange Circuit along with fifteen 
other churches on April 30,1836. This apparently be- 
lies the fact that the Orange Circuit of the N. C. 



136 



Conference wasn't existing prior to 1837, but was 
drawn from the Danville District of the Virginia 
Conference. However, an investigation of the other 
fifteen churches listed in this circuit indicates 
that this "Shilow Church" and its Orange Circuit be- 
longed to the Methodist Protestant Church formed in 
1828 (see Chapter Eight, The Methodist Movement). 
Such complex issues are common in trying to unravel 
the proper pastors , circuits , districts , and conferen- 
ces in which Shiloh Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
was placed and the appropriate chronological order. 

Reverend James M. Rice's report to the Historical 
Commission again identifies Shiloh, this time as be- 
longing to the Alamance Circuit. After leaving the 
Franklinsville Circuit in 1855, Shiloh remained in 
the Alamance Circuit until 1868 along with Salem 
Church of Saxapahaw, Macedonia of McDaniels, Hebron 
of Mount Willing, and Bethlehem of Company Shops, 
among others. One of the most informative references 
available for the period from 1867 until 1890 is 
Branson's N. C. Business Directory. During this term 
Shiloh Church bounced from one circuit to another; 
Alamance Circuit (1867, 1968), High Rock Mission 
Circuit (1869-1874), Yanceyville Circuit (1875-1883), 
and back to the Alamance Circuit from 1884 to 1890. 
Reverend Rice's report verifies Branson's identifica- 



137 



tion. Some of the other churches on Shiloh's circuit 
are recognized as follows: 



High Rock 
Mission 

Philips Chapel 
Pyles 
Pisgah 
Macedonia 



Yanceyville 

Yanceyville Meth. 
Prospect 
Harrisons 
Shady Grove 
Camp Springs 
Kimbro ' s 
New Hope 



Al amance 
(1884-1890) 

Bethel 
Macedonia 
Salem 

Philips Chapel 
Browns Chapel 
Union Ridge 
Swepsonville 



The Civil War drew many preachers from the Con- 
ference as chaplains. The records from 1866 provide 
no information on the appointments for Shiloh as well 
as most other churches. 

In 1891 the Burlington Circuit commenced after 
its formation in 1890. The Burlington District was 
formed in 1954 out of twenty- six charges from the Dur- 
ham District (Shiloh of the Burlington Circuit belonged 
to this district prior to 1954) , twelve charges from 
Fayetteville, and one charge from Raleigh. The Burl- 
ington District of 1954 included churches from the 
following counties: Alamance, Caswell, Chatham, Lee, 
Moore, Harnett, Orange, and Person. Shiloh Church 
became a station charge in 1960 under Reverend Roger 
E. Thompson and today remains in the Burlington Dis- 
trict. 



138 



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145 



8 
The Methodist Movement 

METHODISM 

Methodism was born in England as a movement 
v7hose prime source of energy was derived of the Holy 
Spirit. Following Martin Luthur and the Protestant 
Reformation, John Wesley in 1738, upon his own admis- 
sion, felt a change in his own heart and said that he 
discovered that inner peace comes from God's grace, 
not personal efforts alone. In a break from the Church 
of England Wesley preached that salvation and God's 
grace is free to all people. Consequently, he organ- 
ized the first Methodist Society in 1739 in London, 
England. Wesley trained and appointed lay preachers 
to spread his doctrine, and under his guidance sent 
preachers to America. 

Philip Embury was the first sent by Wesley in 
1766, and preached in New York City where he formed 
the first Methodist Society in America. The first 
Methodist Church built in America was erected in 1768 
on John Street in New York City. Wesley appointed 
Thomas Coke and Francis Asbury joint superintendents 
of work in America, thus making them the first Metho- 
dist Bishops in America, and in December of 1784 a 
group of ministers met and formed the first Conference 



146 



of what was to be called the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of America. The first Annual Conference of 
The Methodist Episcopal Church in America was held 
on April 20, 1785 at the house of Green Hill near 
Louisburg, N. C. Bishops Coke and Asbury presided. 
Bishop Asbury is recognized as the founder of American 
Methodism. Bishop Coke returned shortly thereafter 
to England. Those who remained with the established 
church created into a separate church in 1790 under 
the name of Protestant Episcopal Church. Traveling 
preachers called circuit riders carried the Methodist 
religion to the frontier. In 1796 the American con- 
stituency was divided into Conferences of New England, 
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Virginia, South Carolina, 
and the Western Conference. 

Divisions in later years among the Methodists 
thwarted attempts for full unity. In 1828 a group 
separated which insisted upon more lay representation 
in certain church matters and formed the Methodist 
Protestant Church. However, a larger obstacle raised 
its form, which divided not only the church but the 
country as well. The abolition of slavery rose as a 
point of evil in the Methodist Church with North and 
West siding as agressors on the point, and the 
Southern portion of the church declaring slavery as 
aicivil institution. As early as 1815 action by the 



147 



General Conference was required to answer for the 
moral issues involved and a Compromise -Law was adopted 
which satisfied the church, North and South. But in 
1844 a plan of separation was devised due to an 
uncompromising situation which continued to grow 
among the ranks. Thirteen Annual Conferences seceded 
that year from the North to form the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South. They adopted the same Articles 
of Religion and the same Book of Discipline, but 
struck the portion concerning the slavery issue. The 
actual issue of slavery wasn't resolved until the 
outcome >of the War Between the States was decided. 
With the final abolition of slavery, the question of 
the Church South 's secession from the North, because 
of the slavery issue, drew a ripple of attempts at 
reunion. But the die had been cast, and many years 
would pass before the harsh prejudices and causes for 
separation would be laid to rest. 

The reunion of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
(North), the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and 
the Methodist Protestant Church was eventually rea- 
lized in 1939 as The Methodist Church was organized. 
This reorganization brought back together all the 
original factions which first comprised John Wesley's 
dreams for America. A furthur unification was formed 
in 1968 with The Methodist Church and the Evangelical 



148 



United Brethren Church into what stands today as the 
largest Methodist denomination in the United states, 
The United Methodist Church . 

METHODISM IN NORTH CAROLINA 

The first Methodist Societies organized in Amer- 
ica were formed in New York and Maryland in 1766. In 
1772 Joseph Pilmoor became the first Methodist preacher 
to preach in North Carolina and in March of. 1776 the 
Carolina Circuit was formed. Missionaries, such as 
Robert Williams, had previously reached the region of 
the Roanoke but a regular appointment was not estab- 
lished until this time. Francis Poythress, Edward 
Drumgold, and I sham Tatem were the first appointed 
Carolina Circuit "Riders". There were no churches 
nor pre-existing societies awaiting these gallant 
Bible-bearers. Neither were there conveniences of 
travel, nor a home to return to at the end of day. 
Rather, they were greeted by broad rivers, deep 
creeks, and unending forests (see Chapter Six, The 
Pastors). In 1784 Carolina was a part of ten cir- 
cuits with seventeen total preachers. 

Prior to 1837 the church in North Carolina was 
under the jurisdiction of three different Annual 
Conferences — Virginia, South Carolina, and Holston. 



149 



In 1837 the North Carolina Conference was set off 
from the Virginia Conference, but parts of the 
state still remained under both Virginia and south 
Carolina and Holston. At its inception the North 
Carolina Conference was confined to little more than 
half the state with 19,000 members. By 1894 all the 
N.C. territories were transferred to the N. C. Conf- 
erence, while in 1890 the Conference was divided into 
the North Carolina Conference and Western North Caro- 
lina Conference. Different regions and boundaries 
have developed since, to create the districts and 
circuits as they exist today. 



150 



9 
The Cemetery 

HALLOWED GROUND 

The earliest dated tombrock which remains legible 
in the Shi 1 oh Church cemetery is in memory of Isabel 
Matkins, first wife of Reverend William Matkins, who 
died on July 30 , 1816. However, several of the approx- 
imately 500 memorial stones are illegible and other ob- 
vious gravesites are without markers altogether. The 
land on which the cemetery is located was acquired in 
1802 by William Matkins from the State of North Caro- 
lina. Matkins was known however to have settled on 
this tract at least as early as 1798 and was identified 
as being claimant in the deeds of surrounding land- 
owners. It is quite possible that the original loca- 
tion of the cemetery was picked because of the state 
ownership or Matkins himself could have started it as 
a family plot. 

Due West of the oldest section of the cemetery is 
an area of tombrocks evident of another burial site. 
With no apparent markings, it would be pure conjecture 
to assume identity of the interred in this plot, but 
local tradition holds that this graves ite is that of 
slaves. This burial site also lies on the Matkins 
property of 1802. 

Several references are made to the "Shiloh Grave- 
yard" in the land description of various deeds of land 



151 



transactions made in years past. Positive, permanent 
points of reference were often used to locate or de- 
fine tracts of land, and the cemetery boundaries pro- 
vided the "permanence" necessary. 

The tombstone sometimes provided valuable infor- 
mation about an individual's background. Many child- 
ren are identified by a reference to their parents 
(i.e. "daughter of" or "son of") while a wife may be 
linked to her husband. Many war veterans are noted by 
a descriptive reference or veteran's symbols. George 
Foster, a Shiloh Church Trustee of 1836, is recognized 
as a participant in the Revolutionary War (he would 
have been eighteen years old in 1776 when we declared 
our independence from Britain). The title of "Rev." 
precedes the name of William Matkins noting his posi- 
tion at Shiloh as a local pastor. An insignia of the 
Methodist Church Pastor has also been added to his 
marker. Ironically, the death date inscribed on his 
stone conflicts with recorded notes of the Methodist 
Church. He is listed in the Quarterly Conference Min- 
utes on Sept. 4, 1854 as being present at the Fourth 
Quarterly Conference held at Shiloh Church of the 
Franklinsville Circuit ( see Chapter Three, The Church- 
William Matkins). Inasmuch as his will was probated 
at the June term of 1859 of the Alamance County Court 
Session and the previous terms were held quarterly, 



152 



then it is very likely that his tombrock is dated 
incorrectly by ten years exactly. In addition it is 
recorded in the personal diary of Thomas Moore, Jr. 
that Matkins died on May 3, 1859. 

The joint tombstone of Robert Banks and Daisy 
Etta Smithey Troxler is another unique rock which 
bears a picture inlaid in marble of the couple pos- 
ing for their fiftieth wedding anniversary. Another 
extraordinary monument was erected in remembrance of 
Eugene Lewis and Clarence Wade who died tragically on 
the night of August 23, 1961 following a Boy Scout 

Meeting (see Chapter Five, The Working Groups The 

Boy Scouts). With permission of the boys' parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wade and Mr. and Mrs. Everette 
Lewis, a double-faced cast bronze replica of the Boy 
Scout Badge was set on the tombrock by the boys' 
Scoutmaster , Howard Troxler ( see Illus . 9.1). 




Photo courtesy of Karen Lewis 

ILLUS. 9.1 Tombstone of Clarence Wade and 
Gene Lewis 



153 



SHILOH CEMETERY INTERRED 



Barker, Albert Marvin 


Jan. 


30, 


1901-Sep. 


19, 


1976 


Bird, Empson 


Nov. 


6, 


1849-Nov. 


20, 


1851 


Boon, Mary S. 


Feb. 


26, 


1819-Aug. 


9, 


1909 


Boon, Peter 


Apr. 


18, 


1813-Jun. 


13, 


1880 


Boone, John P. 


Jun. 


23, 


1844-Nov. 


28, 


1944 


Boone, Margarette 


Jul. 




1870-Aug. 


5, 


1876 


Boone, Maxwell Elizabeth 


Jun. 




1853-Dec. 


23, 


1885 


Boone, Sarah J. 


Mar. 


9, 


1847-Feb. 


8, 


1926 


Bouldin, Addie Oakley 


Mar. 


3, 


1899-Jul . 


4, 


1977 


Bouldin, Bettie Faucette 


Dec. 


27, 


1858-Aug. 


22, 


1894 


Bouldin, Johnnie L. 






1865- 




1938 


Bouldin, Katie F. 






1858-. 




1940 


Brannock, 






1767-Apr. 


26, 


1842 


Brannock, Henry 






1757-Jun. 


11, 


1841 


Cobb, Jennie Underwood 


Nov. 


3, 


1874- Jan. 


20, 


1925 


Cobb, John Curry 


Nov. 


8, 


1871-May 


15, 


1952 


Cobb, Lee 






no dates 






Cobb, Willie 






no dates 






Coleman, Nancy H. 






illegible 






Dimont, Ada F. 


Nov. 


11, 


1892- 


? 




Dimont, Annie 






no dates 






Dimont, Arthur 






no dates 






Dimont, Bettie 


Jun. 


22, 


1855- 


? 




Dimont, Eddie C. 


Feb. 


22, 


1891-Mar. 


22, 


1941 


Dimont, Jesse 






no dates 






Dimont, John 


May 


5, 


1859-Mar. 


8, 


1914 


Dimont, Russell 






no dates 






Dimont, Willie 






no dates 






Durham, George Delphus 


Jul. 


2, 


1895-Aug. 


10, 


1965 


Durham, John E. 






1888- 




1918 


Durham, Nannie M. 


Nov. 


27, 


1895-Jun. 


18, 


1944 


Durham, Walter H. 


Mar. 


31, 


1890-May 


27, 


1976 



154 



SHILOH CEMETERY INTERRED 



Faucette, Catherine Summers 


Mar. 


20, 


1814-Nov. 


3, 


1903 


Faucette, Chesley H. 


Jul. 


9, 


1881-Jun. 


19, 


1905 


Faucette, George 


Sep. 


7, 


1802-Feb. 


24, 


1887 


Faucette, Henry L. 


Oct. 


23, 


1852-Jun. 


22, 


1908 


Faucette, John W. 


Dec. 


13, 


1848-Dec. 


16, 


1915 


Faucette, Julia Phibbs 


Oct. 


3, 


1860-Dec. 


31, 


1931 


Faucette, Maggie A. 


Nov. 


23, 


1858- Jan. 


30, 


1897 


Faucette, S. Fred Jr. 


Sep. 


27, 


1909-Nov. 


17, 


1909 


Faucette, Sarah Jane 


Aug. 


9, 


1835-Apr. 


4, 


1912 


Foster, George G. 






1758- 




1848 


Foster, Judy Purcell 






1760- 




1845 


Foster, Sam P. 


Apr. 


20, 


1799-Dec. 


5, 


1854 


Gerringer, Annie K. Matkins 


Aug. 


28, 


1895-Jun. 


8, 


1972 


Gerringer, Talmadge C. 


Oct. 


2, 


1894- Jul. 


3, 


1960 


Gwynn, Annie B. 






1885- 




1957 


Gwynn, Elizabeth F. 


Oct. 


29, 


1837-Aug. 


20, 


1868 


Gwynn, Eula 






1921- 




1948 


Gwyn, George F. 


Apr. 


5, 


1908-Apr. 


5, 


1908 


"Gwyn, Ida 


Mar. 


8, 


1893-Sep. 


4, 


1933 


Gwyn, John W. 


Sep. 


10, 


1833-Mar. 


31, 


1890 


Gwyn, Julia A. 


Jun. 


8, 


1862-Feb. 


26, 


1923 


Gwyn, Mary J. 


Sep. 


10, 


1852-Mar. 


28, 


1889 


Gwyn, Mo Hie Matkins 






1866- 




1948 


Gwynn, Robert L. 






1886- 




1927 


Gwyn, Thomas J. 






1865- 




1924 


Herb in, Amanda Troxler 


Jul. 


15, 


1876-Nov. 


21, 


1960 


Herb in, James Monroe 


Jun. 


27, 


1875-Nov. 


15, 


1937 


Herndon, Billy 


Oct. 


3, 


1930-Jun. 


18, 


1944 


Hornbuckle, Elizabeth 


Jul. 


15, 


1770-Oct. 


6, 


1847 


Howerton, Gladys Marie 


Feb. 


10, 


1942-Jul. 


12, 


1945 



''Gwyn, George W. 



Apr. 10, 1856-Mar. 5, 1922 



155 



SHILOH CEMETERY INTERRED 



Jones, J. Arthur 

Jordan, dau of J.M. 8c Miss 

Jordan, James Hunter 

Jordan, James Monroe 

Jordan, Mary 

Jordan, Mary E. Somers 

Jordan, Missouri C. 



Kernodle, Allen M. 
Kernodle, Claude P. 
Kernodle, Lecy M. 



Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
c Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lev/is 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 
Lewis 



Alice T. 

Andrew 

Annie Matkins 

C. Lee 

Cyrus Ervin 

Duel la Herb in 

Edd Poe 

Elbert Hawkins 

Frank B. 

George Raymond 

Hattie P. 

son of S.A. 8c D.E, 

Janice Marie 

Kenneth B. 

Margaret 

Mary Apple 

Or a Susan Matkins 

Robert Holt 

Roberta B. 

Samuel A. 

Vena Dodson 

Walter Eugene 



Jan. 2 

Jun. 20 

Dec. 16 

Feb. 7 



Jan. 30 
Feb. 4 
Jan. 27 



Nov. 16 

Jun. 15 

Aug. 28 

Jan. 17 

Aug. 29 

Jul. 30 

May 23 

Dec. 23 

Jun. 3 

Jan. 30 

Mar. 5 

Nov. 20 

Aug. 18 

May 16 

Sep. 4 

Aug. 26 

Sep. 4 

Apr. 10 

Sep. 10 

Oct. 7 



1906-May 20 
Feb. 1885 

1913-Aug. 27 
1862- 

1911-Dec. 24 
1869- 

1847-Jun. 13 



1942-Feb. 10 
1899-Jan. 25 
1901-Sep. 2 



1902 
1802 
1887 
1876 
1923 
1854 
1888 
1886 
1877 
1897 
1876 
1882 
1959 
1903 
1807 
1890 
1884 
1931 
1884 
1850 
1901 
1949 



-Feb. 26 

-Dec. 12 

-May 9 

-Aug. 12 

-Aug. 7 

-Oct. 11 

■Jul. 20 

-Feb. 9 

-Jul . 6 

-Sep. 29 

-Mar. 9 

-Nov. 22 

-Jan. 5 

•Jul. 16 

-Nov. 2 

-Nov. 2 

-Feb. 23 

-Jan. 30 

-Feb. 7 

-Aug. 23 



*Lewis, Bessie M. 



Apr. 10, 1884- Jan. 30, 1904 



156 



SHILOH CEMETERY INTERRED 



Lewis, William Robert 




Oct. 


31, 


1875-Sep. 


28, 


1932 


Lovelace, Clarence 0. 




Jun. 


26, 


1918-Oct. 


1, 


1952 


Lovelace, Fannie A. 




Jul. 


17, 


1898-Feb. 


1, 


1937 


Lovelace, Louie H. 




Jun. 


25, 


1898-Jul . 


6, 


1945 


Matkins 


, Aubrey L. 




Oct. 


11, 


1900-Feb. 


18, 


1906 


Matkins 


, E. W. R. 




May 


28, 


1880-May 


29, 


1890 


Matkins 


, Edward Alexander 


May 


28, 


1892-Sep. 


3, 


1948 


Matkins 


, Effie C. 




Jul. 


30, 


1887-Dec. 


20, 


1945 


Matkins 


, Elizabeth 








1787- 




1840 


Matkins 


, Elizabeth 




Mar. 


7, 


1787-Mar. 


13, 


1841 


Matkins 


Emma L. 




Oct. 


15, 


1874-Apr. 


2, 


1910 


Matkins 


, Eugenia Lewis 




Apr. 


13, 


1873-Jan. 


9, 


1962 


Matkins 


George W. 




Feb. 


18, 


1868- Aug. 


24, 


1917 


Matkins 


son of W.G. S: 


L.H. 






Mar. 1944 




Matkins 


son of W.G. 8c 


L.H. 






Mar. 1944 




Matkins 


son of W.G. 8c 


L.H. 






Oct. 1942 




'Matkins 


, J. B. 




Apr. 


6, 


1856-Mar. 


11, 


1908 


Matkins 


J. Nor r is 




Apr. 


15, 


1922-Jan. 


8, 


1945 


Matkins 


Jennie E. Gil! 


.iam 






1868- 




1944 


Matkins 


John 




Dec. 


24, 


1762-Feb. 


8, 


1845 


Matkins 


John C. 








1898- 




1958 


Matkins 


L. Gibbons 




Apr. 


23, 


1879-Mar. 


20, 


1960 


Matkins 


Lemma Cook 




Oct. 


2, 


1894-Oct. 


18, 


1975 


Matkins 


, Lessie J. 




Aug. 


8, 


1902-May 


23, 


1903 


Matkins 


Lu Anne 




Dec. 


29, 


1883- 


? 




Matkins 


, Lydia Fitch 




Oct. 


12, 


1881-Nov. 


3i 


1960 


Matkins 


, Mary 




Feb. 


17, 


1826-Jul . 


9, 


1841 


Matkins 


, Mildred A. 




Dec. 


28, 


1875-Apr. 


4, 


1892 


Matkins 


, Nancy Bell Gwynn 


Oct. 


29, 


1867-Sep. 


7, 


1926 


Matkins 


, Nannie Bell 




Mar. 


6, 


1896-Apr. 


16, 


1896 


Matkins 


, 01 lie S. 








1903- 




1949 



;V Ma tkins , I s abe 1 



Jan. 30, 1780- Jul. 30, 1816 



157 



SHILOH CEMETERY INTERRED 



Matkins, Or a G. 






1902- 




1977 


Matkins, Sarah 






1772-May 


25, 


1858 


Matkins, Silas 


Nov. 


2, 


1810-Dec. 


30, 


1917 


Matkins, Susan F. 


May 


16, 


1814-Feb. 


26, 


1911 


Matkins, Thomas L. 






1867- 




1956 


Matkins, W. A. 


Jan. 


18, 


1866-Jan. 


19, 


1927 


Matkins, William 


Nov. 


10, 


1882- Jul. 


13, 


1909 


Matkins, Rev. William 


Oct. 


15, 


1777-May 


3, 


1849 


Matkins, William S. 


Oct. 


13, 


1910-Sep. 


6, 


1911 


Moore, David A. 


Jan. 


18, 


1906-Apr. 


15, 


1975 


Moore, inf son of M/M B.O. 


Sep. 


7, 


1931 






Moore, Jane Taylor 


Mar. 


1, 


1831-Aug. 


22, 


1849 


Peeples, James Ray 


Sep. 


22, 


1959-Jun. 


2, 


1963 


Phibbs, Elizabeth 


May 


29, 


1831-Dec. 


12, 


1903 


Re id, John Nathaniel 


May 


26, 


1863-Oct. 


25, 


1943 


Re id, Lula Esther Lewis 


Oct. 


20, 


1878-Nov. 


9, 


1972 


Saunders, Eunice D. 


Oct. 


18, 


1936-Aug. 


6, 


1978 


Simpson, Clyde Gwyn (Jack) 


May 


16, 


1909-Oct. 


22, 


1975 


Simpson, Liza G. 






1877- 




1955 


Simpson, M. Van 






1866- 




1924 


Simpson, Margaret Faucette 






1839- 




1930 


Smith, Arnon Mitchell 


Jul. 


2, 


1914-Mar. 


8, 


1928 


Smith, Ubert Coleman 


Feb. 


21, 


1883-Oct. 


21, 


1968 


Smith, Verdie Faucette 


Feb. 


19, 


1890-Aug. 


25, 


1962 


Strickland, Alice Mae 


Mar. 


15, 


1880-Jan. 


7, 


1946 


Strickland, Gordon 


Jun. 


14, 


1923-Feb. 


15, 


1924 


Strickland, Peter 


Aug. 


4, 


1858-Feb. 


1, 


1928 



158 



SHILOH CEMETERY INTERRED 



Taylor, Wm. L. 






1775-May 


26, 


1841 


Thomas son, Hulon R. 


Jan. 


17, 


1904- Jan. 


27, 


1971 


Troxler, (Ball) Corenia K. 


May 


23, 


1890-Sep. 


27, 


1976 


Troxler, Daisy E. Smithey 


Apr. 


24, 


1881-Apr. 


29, 


1962 


Troxler, Eddie R. 






1954- 




1970 


Troxler, Ira Lee 


Jun. 


13, 


1900-Sep. 


16, 


1969 


Troxler, James Edward 






1925- 




1978 


Troxler, Lona Es telle 


Mar. 


25, 


1906-Jun. 


6, 


1916 


Troxler, Peter J. 


Jun. 


12, 


1883-Sep. 


29, 


1950 


Troxler, Roberts Banks 


Aug. 


24, 


1875-Jul . 


21, 


1972 


Troxler, Robert Earl 


Apr. 


8, 


1925-Dec. 


13, 


1925 


Troxler, Robert Lee 






1919- 




1978 


Troxler, Willie 


Aug. 


15, 


1923-Aug. 


15, 


1923 


Underwood, Edward Lee 


Oct. 


9, 


1891-Dec. 


19, 


1972 


Underwood, Kate Faucette 


Oct. 


7, 


1893-Jul . 


31, 


1983 


Wade, Clarence James 


Aug. 


11, 


1948-Aug. 


23, 


1961 


Wagner, Carney A. 


Feb. 


14, 


1910-Dec. 


17, 


1976 


Walker, Alexander 


Feb. 


3, 


1834-Mar. 


19, 


1913 


Walker, Elizabeth J. 


Apr. 


16, 


1841 -Apr. 


22, 


1842 


Walker, George E. 


Jun. 


11, 


1903-Jul. 


25, 


1977 


Walker, Ida Lee 






1877- 




1967 


Walker, J. Boyd 


Oct. 


31, 


1904-Oct. 


24, 


1980 


Walker, Kate Susan 


Oct. 


24, 


1911-Aug. 


20, 


1968 


Walker, Lula F. 


Sep. 


18, 


1910-Dec. 


16, 


1912 


Walker, Madison B. 






1871- 




1951 


Walker, Margaret Viola 


Mar. 


13, 


1904- Jun. 


30, 


1944 


Walker, Susan 


Oct. 


1, 


1831-Jan. 


23, 


1916 


Watlington, Clarence Lester 


Oct. 


23, 


1885-Feb. 


21, 


1964 


Wicker, S locum M. 


Jul. 


22, 


1909-Dec. 




1980 


Workman, James P. 


Oct. 


14, 


1895-Aug. 


8, 


1963 



159 



APPENDIX A 



SHILOH CHURCH DEED OF 1814 

This indenture made this twenty second day of 
December in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight 
Hundred and Fourteen between the Reverend William 
Matkins and William Busick of the county of Orange 
and state of North Carolina of the one part and 
William Brannock, John Matkins, Benjamin Fielder, 
Thomas Garret , Thomas Thompson, Henry Thompson, Thomas 
Dil worth, William Williams, and Roger Simpson, all of 
the state aforesaid as trustees in whom are confided 
the trust and purposes herein after mentioned. Wit- 
nesseth that the said William Matkins and William 
Busick for and in consideration of the sum of two 
dollars in hand paid at and upon the ensealing and 
delivery of these presents the receipt whereof is 
hereby acknowledged hath given, granted, bargained, 
sold, released, confirmed, and conveyed, and by these 
presents doth give grant, bargain, sell, release, 
convey, and confirm in Trust unto them the said 
William Brannock, John Matkins, Benjamin Fielder, 
Thomas Garret, Thomas Thompson, Henry Thompson, Thomas 
Dilworth, William Williams, and Roger Simpson, and 
their successors , Trustees in Trust for the uses , and 



160 



purposes herein after mentioned and declared, all the 
Estate Right, Title Interest property claim and demand 
whatsoever either in Law or Equity which the said 
Reverend William Matkins and William Busick hath or 
have in to or upon, all and singular a certain lot or 
parcel of land lying and being in the county of Orange 
and state aforesaid bounded as follows: Beginning at 
a hickory sapling thence north sixteen poles to a black 
oak thence east ten poles to a hickory thence south 
sixteen poles to a stake thence west ten poles to the 
beginning comer, computed to contain one acre of 
ground together with all and singular the woods, ways, 
privileges, and appurtenances thereunto belonging or 
in any wise appertaining to have and to hold all and 
singular the above named and described lot or piece 
of ground situate lying and being as aforesaid together 
with all the privileges thereunto belonging unto them 
the said William Brannock, John Matkins, Benjamin 
Fiel der , Thomas Garret , Thomas Thompson , Henry Thompson , 
Thomas Dilworth, William Williams, and Roger Simpson 
and their successors in office forever in Trust that 
they shall erect and build or cause to be erected and 
built thereon a House or place of worship for the use of 
the members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the 
United States of America according to the rules of said 
Church and discipline thereof which from time to time 
may be agreed upon and adopted by the ministers and 



161 



preachers of said Church at their General Conference 
in the United States of America and in future Trust 
and confidence that they shall at times for eon permit 
such ministers and preachers as shall be duly author- 
ised by the General Conference to preach and expound 
God's holy word therein and we the said William 
Matkins and William Busick doth by these presents 
warrant and forever defend all and singular the above 
mentioned lot or piece of ground with the appurtenances 
belonging thereto to the said William Busick (Bran- 
nock) , John Matkins, Benjamin Fielder, Thomas Garret, 
Thomas Thompson, Henry Thompson, Thomas Dilworth, 
William Williams and Roger Simpson and their successors 
chosen and appointed agreeable to the Rules of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church from the claim or claims 
of them the said William Matkins and William Busick, 
their heirs or assigns and from the claim or claims 
of all persons whatsoever in testimony whereof the said 
William Matkins (Doctor of Divinity interjected), and 
William Busick have hereunto set their hands, and 
affixed their seals the day and year first above 
written. 

Signed, sealed and delivered William Matkins (seal) 

T r William Busick (seal) 

In presence of us: 

John Longest 0ran S e Count y Ma y Term 1817 

Henry Brannock The execution of the written deed 
was duly proved in open Court by 
the oath of Henry Brannock, a sub- 
scribing witness thereto and order- 
ed to be registered. Test 

J. Taylor C. C. 

162 



APPENDIX B 



SHILOH CHURCH DEED OF 1836 

This indenture made this 7th day of November A. D. 
1836 between William Matkins of the county of Orange 
in the state of North Carolina of the one part and 
Alexander Brannock, William Foster, George Harbin, 
George Foster, Noah Matkins, John Bouldin, Samuel Fos- 
ter, John Foster, and David Thomas all of the state 
aforesaid trustees in trust for the uses and purposes 
hereinafter mentioned of the other part, 

Witnesseth that the said William Matkins for and 
in consideration of the sum of five dollars to him in 
hand paid at and upon the sealing and delivering of 
these presents the receipt whereof is hereby acknow- 
ledged have given, granted, bargained, and sold, re- 
leased, confirmed, conveyed, and by these presents 
doth give, grant, bargain, sell, release, confirm, 
and convey unto them the said Alexander Brannock, 
William Foster, George Harbin, George Foster, John 
Foster , and David Thomas and their successors ( trustees 
in trust for the uses and purposes herein after men- 
tioned and declared) all the estate right title inter- 
est, property claims, and demand whatsoever either in 
law or equity which he the said William Matkins hath 
in to or upon all and singular a certain lot or piece 



163 



of land situate lying and being in the county of 
Orange and state aforesaid bounded and butted as 
follows — to wit — beginning at a hickory, thence east 
seven poles to the road, thence south running with 
the road nineteen poles to a stake thence west ten 
poles to a stake, thence north nineteen poles to the 
beginning containing one acre more or less of land 
together with all and singular the woods , waters , ways, 
privileges and appurtenances that are belonging or in 
any wise pertaining to have and to hold all and sing- 
ular the above mentioned and described lot or piece 
of land situate and lying as aforesaid together with 
all and singular the houses, woods, waters, ways, and 
privileges thereto belonging or in any wise appertain- 
ing unto them the said Alexander Brannock, William 
Foster, George Harbin, George Foster, Noah Matkins, 
John Bouldin, Samuel Foster, John Foster, and David 
Thomas and their successors in office forever in trust 
that they shall erect and build or cause to be created 
and built thereon a house or place of worship for the 
use of the Methodist Episcopal Church of the United 
States of America according to the rules of discipline 
which may from time to time be adopted by the General 
Conference in the United States and the said William 
Matkins doth by these presents warrant and forever 
defend, all and singular the before mentioned and 



164 



described lot or piece of land with the appurtenances 
thereto belonging unto them the said Alexander Bran- 
nock, William Foster, George Harbin, George Foster, 
Noah Matkins, John Bouldin, Samuel Foster, John Fos- 
ter, and David Thomas their successors chosen and ap- 
pointed according to the discipline of the M. E. 
Church in the United States from the claim or claims 
of him the said William Matkins his heirs and as- 
signs and from the claim or claims of all persons 
whatever . 

In testimony whereof the said William Matkins 
hath hereunto set his hand and seal the day and year 
above mentioned and aforesaid. 

Sealed and delivered in the presence of: 

William Roberts 

Henry Brannock 

Thomas Peeler 

John Foster William Matkins (seal) 

Orange County May Term 1839. 
The execution of this deed was duly proven in open 
court by the oath of John Foster, a subscribing wit- 
ness thereto ordered to be registered. 

J. Taylor C. C. 



165 



APPENDIX C 

SHILOH CHURCH QUIT CLAIM DEED OF 1895 

North Carolina 
Alamance County 

This Indenture, made this 21st day, November 1895, 
between A.Walker, I.N.W. Garrison, and George W. Lewis 
of the county of Alamance and state of North Carolina 
on the one part, and A. Walker, J. P. Boon, and Geo. W. 
Lewis , the Trustees and successors of the county of 
Alamance and state of North Carolina on the other part 
Trustees, witnesseth: 

That whereas, on or about the 21st day of Nov. 
1895 the said A. Walker, I.N.W. Garrison and Geo. W. 
Lewis for and in consideration of the sum of twenty 
five dollars, to him in hand paid by the said Trustees, 
did sell and convey to the said Trustees a certain 
tract of land in the county of Alamance and state of 
North Carolina, and bounded as follows, East by I.N. 
W. Garrison, South and West by Geo. W. Lewis, and 
North by A. Walker. 

And whereas, this tract of land was by the said 
A. Walker, I.N.W. Garrison, and G. W. Lewis conveyed 
and assured to the said Trustees of their successors 
and assigns by a certain deed of absolute conveyance 
with full covenants of warranty duly executed, which 
conveyance is now supposed to be lost, never having 
been registered according to law. 



166 



Now, therefore this indenture witnesseth that 
for in consideration of twenty five dollars to have 
in hand paid by said Trustees, hath given, granted, 
released, confirmed, and quit claimed, by these pre- 
sents doth give, grant, release, confirm and quit 
claim, with said Trustees and their successors and 
assigns all their rights, claim interests, and proper- 
ty in and to the said tract of land. 

To have and to hold together with all the appur- 
tenances thereto belonging or in any wise appertain- 
ing to the said A. Walker, I.N.W. Garrison, and Geo. 
W. Lewis, their heirs and assigns free from and in- 
cumbrances . 

In testimony whereof, the said A. Walker, I.N.W. 

Garrison, Geo. W. Lewis have hereunto set their hands 

and seal , the date first above written. 

Witness: George W. Lewis (seal) 

B. C. Thompson I. N. W. Garrison (seal) 

Alexander Walker (seal) 

Susan B. Walker X (Mark) 
Nancy A. Garrison 
Sal lie M. Lewis 

Trust Clause 
In trust, that said premises shall be used, kept main- 
tained and disposed of, as a place of divine worship 
for the use of the ministry and membership of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South: subject to the 
discipl ine , usage and ministerial appointments of said 



167 



Church, or from time to time authorized and declared 
by the General Conference of said Church, and the 
Annual Conference within whose bounds the said pre- 
mises are situated. 

North Carolina 
Alamance County 

I, J.H. Gilliam, Justice of the Peace, do hereby 
certify that A. Walker and wife Susan B. Walker, I.N.W. 
Garrison and his wife Nancy A. Garrison, and Geo. W. 
Lewis and his wife Sal lie M. Lewis personally appeared 
before me this day and acknowledged the due execution 
of the witnessed deed of conveyance and the said Susan 
B. Walker, Nancy A. Garrison, and Sal lie M. Lewis, 
being by me, privately examined, separate and apart 
from their husbands touching his voluntary execution 
of the same, doth state that they required the same 
freely and voluntarily without fear or compulsion of 
these said husbands or any other persons, and that 
they doeth still voluntarily assent thereto. 

Witness my hand and private seal this 21st day 

of Nov. 1895. 

J. H. Gilliam, J. P. (seal) 
North Carolina 
Alamance County 

The foregoing certificate of J. H. Gilliam, a 
Justice of the Peace of Alamance County, is adjudged 
to be correct and the deed duly proven. Therefore, 
let the deed with the certificates thereto be regis- 
tered . 

Witness my hand, this the 3rd day of Dec. 1895. 
G. D. Vincent, Clerk of Superior Court 



168 



APPENDIX D 

SHILOH CHURCH DEED OF 1915 

THIS DEED, Made this the 25th day of February, 
1915, by Jennie B. Kernodle, widow of the late Wesley 
B. Kernodle, (along with) L. M. Kernodle; and J. B. 
Kernodle of Alamance County and State of North Caro- 
lina, of the first part, to W. A. Lewis, S. A. Lev/is, 
G. W. Lewis, J. M. Jordan, and J.J. Boon Trustees of 
Shi 1 oh M. E. Church of Alamance County and State of 
North Carolina, of the second part: 

WITNESSETH, That said parties of the first part 
in consideration of sixty four and 50/100 ($64.50) 
dollars, to them paid by parties of the second part 
(Trustees), the receipt of which is hereby acknow- 
ledged, hath bargained and sold, and by these pre- 
sents doth bargain, sell and convey to said parties 
of the second part (Trustees) and their successors 
in office, assigns, a certain tractor parcel of land 
in Morton Township, Alamance County, State of North 
Carolina, adjoining the lands of Shiloh Church lot, 
M. B. Walker, heirs of Wesley B. Kernodle (deceased) 
and others, and bounded as follows: 

Beginning at a rock a former corner of said heirs 
and said Church lot; beginning thence Sj°W 7.55 chains 
to a stake, corner with said Church lot; thence S845°E 
3 chains to a stake, corner with said Church lot on 
W. side of public road to Altamahawvia Gilliams School , 



169 



N. C. ; thence S11J°E 1.6 chains to a rock on W. side 
of said road; thence S89 1/3° W (B. S. 89 3/4) 2.27 
chains to a rock; thence N46°W 2.8J chains to a rock; 
thence Nj° E 7.61 chains to a rock in said Walkers 
line; thence S84J°E 1.0 chain to the beginning con- 
taining 1-29/100 acres. 

TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the aforesaid tract or par- 
cel of land, and all privileges and appurtenances 
thereto belonging, to the said parties of the second 
part (Trustees) and their successors in office, to 
their only use and behalf forever. 

And the said parties of first part covenant with 
said parties of the second part (Trustees) and their 
successors in office that they are seized of said 
premises in, and have a right to convey the same in 
fee simple; that the same are free and clear from all 
encumbrances, and that they will warrant and defend 
the said title to the same against the claims of per- 
sons whomsoever. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, The said Jennie B. , L. M. , 

and J. B. Kernodle have hereunto set their hands and 

seals, the day and year first above written. 

Jennie B. (X) Kernodle (seal) 
L. M. Kernodle (seal) 
J. B. Kernodle (seal) 

Attest: Lewis H. Holt 



170 



NORTH CAROLINA, Alamance County. 

The execution of the foregoing instrument was this 
day acknowledged before me by Jennie B. Kernodle, 
L. M. Kernodle, and J. B. Kernodle, the grantors for 
the purpose therein expressed, this 25th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1915. 

Lewis H. Holt, J. P. (seal) 

NORTH CAROLINA— Alamance County, 

The foregoing certificate of Lewis H. Holt, 
Justice of the Peace of Alamance County, is adjudged 
to be correct. Let the instrument, with certificates, 
be registered. 

Witness my hand, this 2nd day of March, 1915. 
J. D. Kernodle, Clerk Sup. Ct. 

Filed for registration 8 O'clock A. M. , March 
3rd, 1915, and registered in the office of the Regi- 
ster of Deeds for Alamance County, in Book No. 54 of 
Deeds, page 39, this 3rd day of March, 1915. 

Chas. D. Johnston, Reg. of Deed 



171 



APPENDIX E 



SHILOH CHURCH DEED OF 1943 

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA 
ALAMANCE COUNTY 

THIS DEED, made this 16th day of January, 1943 
by W. L. Gilliam and wife, Lora Gilliam of Alamance 
County and State of North Carolina, parties of the 
first part, to Shiloh Methodist Church and Trustees 
George R. Lewis, W. L. Gwynn, U. C. Smith and their 
successors, all of Alamance County and State of North 
Carolina, parties of the second part: 

WITNESSETH, That said parties of the first part 
in consideration of ten dollars and other things of 
value considerations to them paid by parties of the 
second part, the receipt of which is hereby acknow- 
ledged, have bargained and sold, and by these presents 
do bargain, sell and convey to said parties of the 
second part, and their successors heirs and assigns, 
a certain tractor parcel of land in Morton Township, 
Alamance County, State of North Carolina, adjoining 
the lands of Shiloh Church, W.L. Gilliam, J. N. Reid 
and others, and bounded as follows, viz.: 

Beginning at a point in the center of the road, 
Highway #87 leading from Altamahawto Reidsville, N.C. 
thence south 10 deg. 15 min. East with said road, 
9.93 chains to a stake corner with said Gilliam, 



172 



thence west 1 chain to a corner with Shiloh Church 
lot; thence north 11 deg. West 10.20 chains to a 
corner with Shiloh Church and J. N. Reid thence east 
with said Reid 5 chains to the beginning corner con- 
taining 0.8 of an acre be the same more or less. 

TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the aforesaid tract or 
parcel of land and all privileges and appurtenances 
thereto belonging, to the said parties of the second 
part, their successors and assigns, to their only use 
and behoof forever. And the said parties of the first 
part, covenant to and with the said parties of the 
second part their successors, heirs and assigns, that 
they are seized of said premises in fee, and have a 
right to convey the same in fee simple; that the same 
are free and clear from all encumbrance, and that 
they will warrant and defend the said title to the 
same against the claims of all persons whomsoever. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the said parties of the first 

part, have hereunto set their hands and seals, the 

day and year first above written. 

W. L. Gilliam (seal) 

Lor a Gilliam (seal) 



North Carolina, Alamance County. 

I, C. L. Simpson, a Justice of the Peace and 
Notary Public for the county of Alamance, do hereby 
certify that W. L. Gilliam and wife Lora Gilliam, 
personally appeared before me this day and acknow- 
ledged the due execution of the annexed Deed -of 
Conveyance; and the said Lora Gilliam, being by me 



173 



privately examined, separate and apart from her said 
husband, touching her voluntary execution of the same, 
doth state that she signed the same freely and volun- 
tarily, without fear or compulsion of her said hus- 
band or of any other person, and that she doth still 
voluntarily assent thereto. 

Witness my hand and notary seal, this 18th day 
of January, 1943. 

My commission expires November 28, 1944. 

C. L. Simpson, Notary Public 

North Carolina, Alamance County. 

The foregoing certificate of C. L. Simpson, a 
N. P. of Alamance County, is adjudged to be correct. 
Let the instrument, with the certificates, be regis- 
tered. This 3rd day of February, 1943. 

Sara Murray, asst. Clerk Sup. Court. 

Filed for registration at 11:35 o'clock A.M. , 
Feb. 3, 1943, and registered in the office of the 
Register of Deeds for Alamance County, in Book No. 
137 Deeds; page 424, this 9th day of Feb. 1943. 

Register of Deeds 



174 



APPENDIX F 

SHILOH CHURCH DEED OF 1963 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ALAMANCE COUNTY 

THIS DEED made this 19th day of April, 1963, by 
Ida Walker, single, George Everett Walker, single, 
Kate Susan Walker, single, Boyd Walker and wife, 
Pauline Walker, all of Alamance County, North Carolina, 
parties of the first part, to H. R. Thomasson, W. F. 
Moore and Sam Lewis of Alamance County , North Caro- 
lina, Trustees of the Shiloh Methodist Church, Burl- 
ington District of the North Carolina Conference of 
the Methodist Church, and their successors in office 
and assigns, parties of the second part; 

WITNESSETH: 
That the parties of the first part, in consider- 
ation of $10.00 and other valuable consideration to 
them paid by the parties of the second part, the re- 
ceipt of which is acknowledged, have bargained and 
sold and by these presents do bargain, sell and con- 
vey to the parties of the second part as Trustees of 
the Shiloh Methodist Church, Burlington District of 
the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Church, 
and their successors in office and assigns, all of 
the following described real property: 



175 



A certain tract or parcel of land in Morton 
Township, Alamance County, North Carolina, adjoining 
the lands of Brooks Kernodle, The Shiloh Methodist 
Church, W. N. Reid, James Boyd Walker and Frank Mat- 
kins, more particularly described as follows: 

BEGINNING at a rock, corner with Brooks Kernodle 
and The Shiloh Methodist Church Property; running 
thence with the said Church Property, S. 83 deg. 27 
min. E. -248 feet to a nail in the center of N. C. 
Highway No. 87 (iron stake on this line 30 feet from 
the corner in the center of the highway) , corner with 
the said Church Property and W.N. Reid; running thence 
along the center of the pavement of the said Highway 
with W.N. Reid, N. 8 deg. 50 min. W. - 305 feet to a 
point in the center of the pavement, and being a new 
corner with James Boyd Walker in W. N. Reid's line; 
running thence a new line with James Boyd Walker, 
S. 83 deg. 45 min. W.-460.5 feet (iron stake on this 
line 30 feet from the corner in the road) to an iron 
stake, being a new corner with James Boyd Walker in 
Frank Matkins' line; running thence with the said 
Matkins, S. 1 deg. 45 min. W. - 192.4 feet to an iron 
stake, corner with Frank Matkins and Brooks Kernodle; 
running thence with the said Kernodle, S. 83 deg. 27 
min. E. — 264 feet to the BEGINNING, and containing 
2.71 acres, more or less. This is a part of the pro- 
perty conveyed by J.M.Jordan and wife, M. C. Jordan, 
to M. B. Walker, March 6, 1909, as per deed recorded 
in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Alamance 
County, North Carolina, in Book 52 at pages 108-109. 

The above description was obtained by a survey 
made by W. T. Hall, C.E., March 25, 1963. 

The above property was devised to the parties of 
the first part by Will of Madison Boyd Walker, which 



176 



Will is recorded in the Office of the Clerk of Super- 
ior Court for Alamance County, North Carolina, in Will 
Book 12 at page 183. 

TO HAVE AND TO HOLD said real property, with all 
privileges and appurtenances thereunto belonging, to 
the said parties of the second part, their successors 
in office and assigns, forever. 

The parties of the first part covenant that they 
are seized of said real property in fee, and have the 
right to convey the same in fee simple ; that the same 
is free from all encumbrances; and that they will war- 
rant and defend the title to same against the claims 
of all persons whomsoever. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties of the first part 
have hereunto set their hands and seal s the day and 
year first above written. 

Ida Walker (X) (seal) 
George Everette Walker (seal) 
Kate Susan Walker (seal) 
Boyd Walker (seal) 

Pauline Walker (seal) 

NORTH CAROLINA 

ALAMANCE COUNTY 

I, Lucille Roberts, a Notary Public of said 
County, do hereby certify that Ida Walker, single, 
George Everett Walker, single, Kate Susan Walker, 
single, Boyd Walker and wife, Pauline Walker, person- 



177 



ally appeared before me this day and acknowledged the 
due execution of the foregoing deed. Witness my hand 
and official seal, this 25th day of April, 1963. 

Lucille Roberts, Notary Public 

My commission expires Oct. 25, 1963 

Filed for record at 11:30 o'clock A.M., on May 
5, 1963, North Carolina, Alamance County. 

D. B. Paris, Register of Deeds 

J. Hargrove, Deputy 



NORTH CAROLINA— Alamance County 

The foregoing certificate of Lucille Roberts, 
Notary or Notaries Public of the governmental units 
designated, is or are adjudged to be correct. Let 
the instrument, with the certificates, be registered. 

This 3rd day of May, 1963. 

Louise B. Wilson 

Deputy Clerk of Superior Court 



178 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Baldwin, Rev. J. A. , History of Methodism in N. C. , 
1800-1837 , 1893. 

Bangs, History of the M. E. Church , 1857. 

Basset, Ancel H. , History of the Methodist Protestant 
Church . 

Brabham, A History of Sunday School Work in the North 
Carolina Conference, M. E. Church, South , 1925. 

Branson, N. C. Business Directory , 1867-1890. 

"Burlington Circuit MYF News, The", 1946. 

"Durham District Conference Record", 1882-1888. 

Farish, The Circuit Rider Dismounts , 1938. 

"Federal Census Records", 1840, 1850, 1860. 

"Handbook and Almanac North Carolina Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South", 1902. 

"Handbook of the Methodist Youth Fellowship", 1953. 

Hedges, Rev. J. W. , Crowned Victors , 1878. 

"Histories of Methodist Churches in Alamance County", 
1963. 

Lewis, Alton P., "Memoirs of Alton P. Lewis", 1978- 
1983. 

M. E. Church Annual Conference Journals, 1821-1843. 



179 



M. E. Church, South Conference Minutes , 1845-1852. 

Methodist Church N. C. Conference Journals , 1844-1889. 

Moore, Rise and Progress of the M. E. Church, South , 
1876. 

Morton ' s Store Journal , 1880. 

Myers, The Disruption of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church , 1375. 

"N. C. Conference Historical Directory", 1976. 

"N. C. Conference Yanceyville Circuit Minutes", 1844- 
1877. 

Petty, Rev. Dwight A., "Burlington Circuit Messenger", 
1922. 

"Production Story, N. C. Annual Conference, S. E. 
Jurisdiction", 1950-1959. 

"Quarterly Conference — Chatham Circuit Minutes", 1833- 
1871. 

Rice, Rev. James M. , "The Methodist Church Papers: 
The Historical Sketches of Circuits", 1895. 

Smith, Young People's History — Epworth League . 

Smith, H. H. , "A Lecture on the Pioneer Circuit Rider", 
1869. 

Stevens, "Legacy for the Future", 1978. 



180 



Taylor, Roots, Religion, and Revival , 1965. 

United Methodist Church — Women's Division Board of 
Global Ministries, "A Centennial Tapestry-The 
Continuing Journey of Women in Missions", 1983. 

Wardle, History of the Sunday School Movement in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church , 1918. 

Willis, R. H. , "History of Methodism in N. C. in the 
Eighteenth Century", 1933. 



181 



INDEX 

In an effort to minimize redundancy this index 
does not include the names already listed in alpha- 
betical order in the Boy Scout Troop #142 Membership 
Roll, the Shiloh Church Membership Roll, and Shiloh 
Cemetery Interred List. Please refer to the follow- 
ing pages for the persons included in these lists. 

Boy Scout Troop #142 Membership Roll 104-105 

Shiloh Church Membership Roll 55-80 

Shiloh Cemetery Interred 151-159 

Also not included in the following indexed pages 
is the information that is recorded in the Pastor's 
Biographical Sketches on pages 123-134. Since this 
information includes a variety of appointments par- 
ticular to the individual, of conferences, circuits, 
and charges, it may prove valuable to the researchist 
to investigate these individuals. The pastor's name 
will appear in the INDEX for ready reference to the 
page number on which his Biographical Sketch will 
appear . 



182 



INDEX 

Alamance Circuit 40, 137, 142, 143 

Alamance County 2, 3, 44, 47, 136, 138, 

166, 168, 169, 171, 172, 
173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 
178 

Alamance County Court 152 

Allen, Iona Lewis 96 

Altamahaw 169, 172 

Altamahaw Pentacostal Holiness 

Church 91 

altar rail 13, 14, 109 

Amherst Circuit 123 

Anderson, Rev. W. 143 

Annual Conferences, Methodist 122, 168 

A-0 Community Center 110 

Apple, Richard 34 

Articles of Religion 148 

Asbury, Bishop Francis 84, 111, 120, 146, 147 

Assessment List 48, 50, 54 



Bal 1 , Hannah 


82 


Baltimore Conference 


147 


Baptism 


55 


Barber, Margaret S. 


13, 98, 114 


Barber, Vernon J. 


13, 98, 103 


Barker, Annie (Mrs. A.M.) 


109 


Barnes, Rev. William H. 


142 


basement 


9,99 


Bedford Circuit 


123 


bell tower 


7, 9 


Berea Church 


90, 92 


Bernard, Rev. Allen R. 


145 


Bethany M. E. Church 


136 


Bethel Methodist Church 


17, 24, 90, 92, 138 


Bethlehem Christian Church 


90, 92 



183 



INDEX 



Bethlehem Church Road 


47 


Bethlehem M. E. church 


136, 137 


Bibb, Rev. R. P. 


144 


Bible 


121 


Bible School 


114, 115, 118 


Bible Study 


82 


bishop 


51, 84, 111, 120, 121, 




146, 147 


Blackburn, Robert M. 


51 


Bladen Circuit 


84 


Board of Global Ministries 


108, 109 


Board of Review, Boy Scouts 


102 


Book of Discipline 


148 


Boon, J. J. 


169 


Boon, J. R. 


92 


Boone, John P. 


48, 85, 166 


Boone, W. J. 


85 


Bouldin, Billie 


113, 116, 118 


Bouldin, John 


27, 40, 56, 163-165 


Bowles, Molie 


87 


Bowles, R. P. 


85 


Bowles, Thomas 


85 


Boy Scout Badge 


102, 153 


Boy Scout Troop #142 


15, 99-105 


Boy Scouts of America 


99, 102, 153 


Brannock, George 


85, 87 


Brannock, Henry 


23, 162, 165 


Brannock, J. R. 


85 


Brannock, Katie 


87 


Brannock, Ned 


85, 88 


Brannock, Rosanna 


48, 85, 86, 87 


Brannock, W. H. 


85 


Brannock, William 


22, 23, 39, 56, 160-162 


Branson's N. C. Business 




Directory 


137 


Brower, Rev. J. M. 


141 



184 



INDEX 

Brown, Jarvis 114 

Brown's Chapel M. E. Church 138 

Brown' M. E. Church 136 

Browning, Rev. Paul C. 131, 139 

Bruton, Rev. Raleigh A. 140 

Bullock, Vera Kernodle 34 

Burlington Boys Choir 52, 53 

Burlington Circuit 17, 22, 50, 90, 112, 138, 

139, 140, 141, 108 

Burlington Circuit Messenger 111 

Burlington Circuit MYF News 112 

Burlington District 52, 138, 139, 175 

Busick, Caleb 23, 41 

Busick, Isabel Elizabeth 41 

Busick, William 2, 3, 17, 23, 25, 26, 28, 

42, 160, 161, 162 



camp meeting 1, 2, 121 

Camp Springs Methodist Church 17, 24, 42, 53, 136, 138 

camping 99, 100 

camporee 99 

Carolina Circuit 149 

Caswell Circuit 135, 145 

Caswell County 24, 42, 53, 136, 138 

Cedarfalls Church 136 

cemetery 4, 9, 17, 25, 29, 36, 37, 

40, 41, 42, 46, 151, 152 

Cemetery Fund 54 

Cemetery, Shiloh Church 26, 28, 31, 34, 151-159 

Cemetery Sign 117 

Census, Federal 43, 44 

Centenary Treasurer 50 

Chaff in, Rev. Washington S. 123, 143 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 89 



185 



INDEX 



chaplains 
Chatham County 
Cherokee Council 




138 
138 
102 


Chester, Rev. Harley 
choir 


A. 


131, 139 
97, 98 


choir director 




97 


choir robes 




13, 97, 98 


Chrismon Tree 




109 


Christian Children's 


Fund 


118 


Christmas Dinner 




110, 119 


Christmas Program 




51, 110 


circuit 




35, 46, 122, 135, 137, 
149, 150 


circuit rider 




43, 46, 120, 147, 149 


Circuits, Historical 


Sketches 


5, 136 


Civil War 




138, 148 


Clark, Rev. Charles C. 


19, 116, 139 


Class Leader 




44 


classrooms 




9, 10, 11 


Clerk of Court 




162, 165, 168, 171, 174, 
177, 178 


Cobles M. E. Church 




136 


Coke, Bishop Thomas 
Coleman, Elizabeth 




111, 146, 147 
48, 88 


Coleman, J. H. 




48, 86, 87 


Coleman, J. W. 




48 


Company Shops 
Conference Appointments 
Conference Journals 


137 

139-145 

122 


Crowned Victors 




120 


Dameron, E. S. W. 




90 


Daniel ly, James 




24 


Daniel y, Earl 




112 



186 



INDEX 



Danville District, Va. Conf. 


137, 144 




Davidson, Rev. Barney 


12 




deed 


2, 4, 5, 21, 22, 24. 


, 25, 




27, 29, 30, 32, 35, 


36, 




39, 40, 41, 42, 54, 


151, 




160-178 




Deed of Conveyance 


173 




Department of Christian Social 






Relations and Local 






Church Activities 


107 




Dilworth, Thomas 


24, 39, 56, 160-162 




director, choir 


97 




Discipline, Methodist 


121, 161, 164, 167 




District Superintendent 


12, 50, 52 




Doctor of Divinity 


162 




Drumgold, Edward 


149 




Duke Endowment Fund 


10, 11 




Duke University 


53, 114 




Durant, Rev. Charles 0. 


128, 141 




Durham District 


139-142 




Durham, Elmo 


112 




Durham, Fred 


112 




Dye, Rev. George W. 


144 




Eagle Scout 


102 




Earnhardt, Rev. D. L. 


126, 141 




Easter 


10, 95 




Easter, Junior 


112 




Ector Letter 


1, 2, 3, 25 




Ector, Ludie Lewis 


1 




elder 


121 




elder (lay) 


43, 121 




Elder (Presiding) 


50 




Ellerbe, Mrs. M. C. 


%, 




Ellerbe, Rev. M. C. 


140 





187 



INDEX 

Elliott, Rev. William M. 83, 145 

Embury, Philip 146 

Epworth League 111, 112 
Evangelical United Brethren 

Church 107, 149 



Fairview Church 


90, 92 


Faucette, Bettie M. 


48, 87 


Faucette, H. L. 


48 


Faucette, J. W. 


48, 49, 88, 93 


Faucette, Jane 


48 


Faucette, Katie B. 


48, 87 


Faucette, L. H. 


112 


Faucette, Margaret 


88 


Faucette, Missouri 


85 


Faucette, Peter 


48, 85, 87 


Fayetteville, N. C. 


138 


Fayetteville Road 


4, 29, 31, 32, 33, 45, 47 


Federal Census 


43, 44 


Fellowship Hall 


11, 12, 110, 119 


Field, Rev. Benton 


145 


Fielder, Benjamin 


22, 39, 56, 160-162 


fire escapes 


118 


fire extinguishers 


118 


Foster, George 


23, 27, 40, 44, 56, 152, 




163-165 


Foster, John 


27, 40, 56, 163-165 


Foster, Rev. Russell B. 


145 


Foster, Samuel P. 


24, 27, 40, 56, 163-165 


Foster, William 


27, 40, 41, 45, 56, 




163-165 


Franklinsville Church 


136 


Franklinsville Circuit 


40, 136, 137, 143 


Frazier, Rev. Lindsay 


140 


Freeman, Rev. Evan E. 


143 


Funeral (Wade, Lewis) 


100, 101 



188 



INDEX 



Galloway, Rev. W. F. 


128 


, 140 




Garret, Thomas 


22, 


39, 56, 


160-162 


Garrison, I. N. W. 


29, 


30, 31, 


87, 166-168 


Garrison, L. L. 


90 






Garrison, Nancy A. 


167 


, 168 




Garris, Rev. Alexander 


124 


, 143 




General Conference 


85, 


148, 162, 164, 168 


Gerringer, Ethel Gilliam 


96 






Ger ringer, Hulon 


103 


, 116 




Gerringer, Talmadge 


19 






Gibson, Alex. E. 


120 






Gibbons, Rev. Lemuel H. 


125 


, 142 




Gilliam, Dora 


88 






Gilliam, Every 


12 






Gilliam, Fannie 


87 






Gilliam, Ginie 


87 






Gilliam, Havoline Troxler 


53, 


94, 97 




Gilliam, J. H. 


168 






Gilliam, J. Wesley 


12, 


53 




Gilliam, Lor a 


33, 


98, 172 


, 173, 174 


Gilliam, Nancy Reid 


94 






Gilliam, Ray 


53 






Gilliam, W. L. (Bill) 


33, 


35, 93, 


172, 173, 174 


Gilliam's Church 


47 






Gilliam's Church Road 


47 






Gilliam's School 


169 






Gill urn, Robert 


23 






Gobbell, L. L. 


90 






Grant, Dr. Nick W. 


52 






Grantham's Church 


84 






graveyard 


100 


, 151 




Great Road, The 


23, 


26, 32, 


33 


Green Hill 


147 






Greensboro District 


40, 


43, 44, 


143, 144 


Guilford County 


44 






Gwynn, Grank 


88 






Gwynn, Ginie 


87 







189 



INDEX 

Gwynn, Howard 103 

Gwynn, Huie 88 

Gwynn, Laura 85 

Gwynn, Mary J. 85 

Gwynn, Mollie (Mrs. T. J.) 51, 

Gwynn, Thomas J. 49, 50, 86, 87, 92 

Gwynn, W. L. 172 



Hackett, Rev. Charles 12, 134, 139 

Hackney, Rev. W. J. 141 

Hall, W. T. 176 

Harbin, George 27, 40, 56, 163-165 

Hardesty, Rev. William R. 129, 140 

Hargrove, J. 178 

Harnett County 138 

Harris, Rev. Arthur F. 144 

Harris, Rev. Loy V. 129, 140, 108 

Harris, S. A. 92 

Harrison's M. E. Church 138 

Hartsell, Rev. J. C. 142 

Haw River 44, 45 

Hebron M. E. Church 137 

Hedges, Rev. J. W. 120 

Herbin, Alvin 13, 103, 116, 117 

Herb in, Bertha G. 96, 98 

Herbin, F. L. 48, 88 

Herbin, Kermit 98 

Herbin, Norman 20, 93, 98 

Herbin, William 41, 45, 47 

Hicks, John 23 

Higgins, Rev. Tom F. 140 

High Rock Mission Circuit 137, 138, 142 

High Rock Road 23, 47 

High Wycombe, England 82 

hiking 99 



190 



INDEX 



Hillsboro Circuit 


144 




Hillsboro District 


5, 89, 142 


Hillsboro, N. C. 


25 




Histories of Methodist 






Churches in Alamance Cty. 


136 




Holmes, Rev. William 


145 




Holston Conference 


149, 


150 


Holt, Lewis H. 


170, 


171 


homecoming 


50 




Horseshoe Bend 


45 




House of Worship 


161, 


164 


Howerton, Edker B. 


101 




Hoyle, Rev. S. V. 


34 




Hunter, Rev. Samuel 


145 




Hurley, Rev. John B. 


139 




Hut tons M. E. Church 


136 




hymn Book 


121 




hymns 


95 




Indiana, Green Castle 


41 




Ingold, Peter 


85 




Ingold, Rachel 


48 




Ireland, Paul 


92 




Ireland, Pearl 
itinerancy 


92 
120 





Jenkins, Rev. John W. 125, 142 
John Street Methodist Church 146 

Johnson, Rev. Carl A. 130, 140 

Johnson, Rev. J. S. 112, 140 

Johnson, Rev. L. L. 142 

Johnston, Chas. D. 171 

Jones, Ora 111 



191 



INDEX 



Jordan, George 


30, 31, 36 


Jordan, George E. 


48, 49, 85, 86, 87, 91 


Jordan, Hunter 


113 


Jordan, James Monroe 


45, 48, 49, 50, 85, 88, 




91, 93, 97, 98, 169, 176 


Jordan, Lula 


51 


Jordan, Missouri 


86, 87, 93, 176 


Justice of the Peace 


168, 171, 173 


Keck, Pete 


99, 104, 115 


Keck, Roger E. 


99, 104, 115 


Kennedy, Rev. A. H. 


144 


Kernodle, Adam 


45 


Kernodle, Allen 


115 


Kernodle, Augusta 


87 


Kernodle, Brooks 


176 


Kernodle, Douglas 


86 


Kernodle, Ida 


88 


Kernodle, J. B. 


169, 170, 171 


Kernodle, J. D. 


171 


Kernodle, Jennie B. 


169-171 


Kernodle, John 


27 


Kernodle, Josiah 


27, 45 


Kernodle, Lecy 


53, 54, 13 


Kernodle, Loft in 


85, 169, 170, 171 


Kernodle, Wesley B. 


169 


Kimball, Rev. Lewis 


145 


Kimbro's M. E. Church 


138 


King, Rev. C. W. 


142 


Korean Kindergarten Schools 


109 


Kiwanis Club of Reidsville 


109 



192 



INDEX 



Lance 


, Rev. Hicks E. 


130, 140 


land grant 


22 


Lane, 


Rev. Joakim 


145 


LaRocco, Sharon Moss 


53 


Laurinburg Project, East 


109 


lay elder 


43, 121 


lay leader 


50 


lay preacher 


146 


Lea, Rev. Addison 


144 


Lee County 


138 


Lee, Elsie 


92 


Lee, Jim 


98 


Leigh 


, Rev. Joshua 


145 


Lewis 


, A. M. 


48, 85, 88 


Lewis 


Alton P. 


15 


Lewis 


, Anderrena Brown 


13 


Lewis 


Andrew 


1, 2, 24, 27, 35, 
44-46, 49, 56 


Lewis. 


, Anna 


85 


Lewis. 


C. Lee 


50, 90 


Lewis 


Cyrus Ervin 


11, 19, 20, 103, 116 


Lewis 


Donnie 


99, 104 


Lewis 


Dora 


85, 86, 88 


Lewis 


, Edith 


93 


Lewis 


, Ervie 


12, 101 


Lewis 


, Eugenia 


85, 87 


Lewis 


, Eva 


96, 98 


Lewis 


, Everette 


20, 93, 116, 117, 153 


Lewis 


, Frank B. 


49 


Lewis 


, Gene 


100, 104, 153 


Lewis 


, George R. 


172 


Lewis 


, George W. 


29, 30, 31, 48, 98, 
166-168, 169 


Lewis 


, Iona (Allen) 


96 


T iewis 


, J. W. 


85, 87 



193 



INDEX 



Lewis, Jack 


98, 113 


Lewis, Julia 


85, 87 


Lewis Lane 


44, 45 


Lewis, Lizzie 


88 


Lewis, Lucy 


85, 87 


Lewis, Margaret 


44 


Lewis, Mary Apple (Mrs. Edd) 


92, 111, 113 


Lewis, Mary (Smith) 


98 


Lewis, Ora Matkins 


96 


Lewis Reunion 


46 


Lewis, Rober 


86 


Lewis, Robert W. 


88 


Lewis, Sal lie 


86, 88, 167, 168 


Lewis, Sam A. 


48, 49, 85, 86, 88, 91, 




169 


Lewis , Sammy 


101, 104 


Lewis, Samuel Freeman 


11, 15, 99, 100, 101, 




103, 112, 113, 116, 175 


Lewis , Sarah 


85 


Lewis, Vena 


98 


Lewis, W. Robert 


50 


Lewis, William A. 


1, 48, 50, 169 


Lewis, Wm. Jr. 


85, 87 


local pastor 


152 


Long, James 


101 


Longest, John 


162 


Louisburg, N. C. 


147 


Lumsden, Rev. J. D. 


143 


McCulloch, J. C. 


92 


McDaniels 


137 


Mclntyre, Alphonzo 


92 


M' Donald, Rev. Thales 


144 


M'Intosh, Rev. John R. 


144 


M' Masters, Rev. William J. 


144 



194 



INDEX 



Macedonia M. E. Church 


136, 137, 138 


Manes s, Rev. William L. 


133, 139 


Martindale, C. M. 


116 


Martin Luthur 


81, 146 


Maryland, Dorchester County 


41 


Matkins, Andrew 


42 


Matkins 


Clarence C. 


11, 52, 112, 116, 117 


Matkins . 


Coy 


112 


Matkins , 


David 


42, 43, 45 


Matkins . 


Dennis 


42 


Matkins 


Dinah 


42 


*Matkins . 


Elinor 


42, 43, 45 


Matkins 


Elizabeth (dau. of 




1^ 


t. William) 


41 


Matkins 


Elizabeth Moore 


42 


Matkins 


Florence 


93 


Matkins 


, Frank 


20, 34, 116, 176 


Matkins 


George W. 


91 


Matkins . 


Ila (Terrell) 


96 


Matkins . 


Isaac 


41 


Matkins 


Isabel 


3, 25, 41, 151 


Matkins . 


Isabella 


42, 43, 45 


Matkins 


J. C. 


93 


Matkins 


Jerry F. 


12, 99, 100, 101, 105 


Matkins 


, Joe 


48 


-H-Matkins 


, John 


22, 39, 56, 160-162 


Matkins 


, John C. 


11, 15, 50, 97, 98 


Matkins 


, John Norris 


10, 113 


Matkins 


, John (son of Rev. Wm) 


41 


Matkins 


, Karon 


12 


Matkins 


, L. G. Jr. 


93 


Matkins 


, Lemuel Gibbons 


10, 50, 53 


Matkins 


, Leonard F. 


103 


Matkins 


, Leta 


12, 96 


Matkins 


, (Lydia) Mrs. L. G. 


2, 10, 53, 93, 108, 112 


Matkins 


, Margaret 


41 


"Matkins 


, Eddie 


88 


-H-Matkins 


, Joe F. 


12, 116 



195 



INDEX 

Matkins, Martha J. Elizabeth 42, 43 

Matkins, Mildred 114 

Matkins, Mollie 87 

Matkins, Noah 27, 40, 41, 43, 56, 

163-165 

Matkins, Ora (Lewis) 11, 96, 98, 

Matkins, Reverend William 2, 3, 4, 17, 22, 24, 25, 

27, 32, 41-44, 46, 56, 
121, 122, 151, 152, 160-165 

Matkins , Sarah 41 

Matkins, T. L. (Mrs) 109 

Matkins, Thomas F. 42, 43, 88 

Matkins, Thomas L. 88, 98 

Matkins, W. A. 91 

Matkins, W. H. 48, 88 

Matkins, William King 41 

Matkins, Worth 12, 96, 112 

Matkins, Wm. Jr. 85 

r Matlock, Rebecca 85 

Matlock, Rufus 85 

Mattamuskeet Circuit 123 

Maxwell, James 85 

Maynard, Richard 49 

Maynard, Robert 85 

Mecklenburg Circuit 123 

Meetinghouse, Shilow 41 

Membership Roll 54, 55, 56-80 

Methodism 111, 120, 146-150 

Methodist Church Papers 5, 136 

Methodist Church Pastor 152 

Methodist Conference 83 

Methodis t Church , N . C . Conf . , 

S. E. Journal 135 

Methodist Church, The 148, 175 

Methodist Episcopal Church 1, 2, 4, 22, 24, 25, 43, 

91, 106, 111, 112, 147, 
148, 161, 162, 164, 165, 
169, 92 

-Matkins, Yancie 88 

196 



INDEX 



Methodist Episcopal Church of 



America 


147 




M. E. Church Conf . Journal 


135 




Methodist Episcopal Church, 






South 


107, 
167 


112, 137, 148, 164 


Methodist Journals 


122 




Methodist Men 


11, 


114, 116-119 


Methodist Protestant Church 


107, 


112, 137, 147, 148 


Methodist Society 


146, 


149 


Methodist Women 


13, 


106, 116 


Methodist Youth Fellowship 


112 




Middle Ages 


81 




Miller, Rev. John A. 


123, 


143 


missionaries 


149 




Missionary Centary 


50 




missionary societies 


85 




missions 


106, 


107, 108, 109 


: Moore, Charles 


101 




Moore County 


138 




Moore, David 


116 




Moore, Elizabeth 


42 




Moore, Margaret 


114 




Moore, Susan 


53 




Moore, W. F. 


103, 


116, 175 


Moorman, Rev. Charles P. 


144 




Morton, B. F. 


47 




Morton Post Office 


47 




Morton's Store 


47 




Morton Township 


43, 


90, 169, 172, 176 


Morton Township Sunday School 






Convention 


90, 


91, 92 


Morton's Store Journal 


47, 


48, 55 


Moses, Rev. Thomas C. 


124, 


143 


Mount Willing 


137 




Mt. Vernon 


17 




Murray, Sarah 


174 




music 


95-98, 114 



Moore, Brenda 



115 



197 



INDEX 



Nesbitt, Rev. William W. 
Neuse District, Va. Conf. 
New England Conference 
New Hope M. E. Church 
New Salem Church 
Newlin, Rev. J. R. 
Nicks, Rev. Robert L. 
Nicks, Rev. Samuel F. 
Noblitt, Rev. Frank B. 
Norman, Rev. Alfred 
N. C. Business Directory, 

Branson's 137 

N. C. Conf. Sunday School Comm 84 
N. C. Conf. Sunday Schools 90 
N. C. Dept. of Transportation 33 
N. C. Youth Ministry 118 
North Carolina Annual Conf. 51, 84, 136, 150, 175 
North Carolina Gen. Conf. 89 
Notary Public 173, 174, 177, 178 



123, 144 
144 

147 

138 

17 

141 

131, 139 

17, 128, 141 

128, 141 

124, 142 



Ohio, Cleveland 
Orange Circuit 
Orange County 

organ 

Ormond, Rev. A. L. 
Overton, Rev. Ernest G, 
Oxford League 



111 

123, 136, 137, 143, 144 

2, 4, 24, 25, 27, 41, 44, 

138, 160, 162, 163, 165 

10, 95, 96, 97 

126, 141 

129, 140 

111 



Paine College 

Paris, D. B. 

Parker, Rev. Jesse H. 



109 
178 
139 



198 



INDEX 



Parrish, Rev. Leslie L. 
parsonage 

Paschal 1, Annie G. 

Pastors Biographies 

Paul ' s Restaurant 

Peeler, Thomas 

Peeples, Edgar 

Peeples, Marie 

Peeples, Ray 

Peebles, Rev. William 

Pepper, Rev. Clarendon M. 

Person County 

Petty, Rev. Dwight A. 

Phibbs, Bettie J. 

Phibbs, Julia 

Philadelphia Conference 

Phillips Chapel M. E. Church 

Phillips, Rev. Charles H. 

piano 

picnic shelter 

Piliser M. E. Church 

Pilmoor, Joseph 

Pisgah M. E. Church 

Poythress, Francis 

Prather, Leonard 

preacher, local 

Preacher, Methodist 

Presiding Elder 
Pritchett, Edgar 
Prospect . M . E . Church 
Protestant Episcopal Church 
Protestant Reformation 
pulpit furniture 
pump house 
Pyles M. E. Church 



130, 140 

3, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24, 

34, 35, 109, 117, 118 

92 

123-134 

116 

165 

19, 103, 116, 117 

12, 13, 20 

19 

145 

143 

138 

50, 92, 129, 140 

48, 85 

85, 87 

147 

138 

124, 143 

12, 95, 96 

15, 16, 32, 34, 50 

136 

149 

138 

149 

23 

42, 43, 46, 121, 122, 152 

46, 120, 121, 122, 149, 

162 

50 

101 

136, 138 

147 

146 

10, 109 

32, 118 

138 



199 



INDEX 

Quadrennial Sunday School 

Board 89 
Quarterly Conference, 

Franklinsville Circuit 40, 43, 44, 136, 152 
Quarterly Conference, 

Yanceyville Circuit 5 

Quit Claim Deed 29, 30, 32, 166-168 
Quarterly Conference, 

Burlington Circuit 108 

Raikes, Robert 82 

Raleigh Christian Advocate 49 

Raleigh District 40, 43, 44, 142, 143, 144 

Raleigh, N. C. 138 

Randolph M. E. Church 136 

Reformation 81 

Register of Deeds 171, 174, 176, 178 

Re id Dairy Farm 2 

Reid, Edna 96, 97, 114 

Reid, J. N. 31, 33, 172, 173 

Reid, (Mrs.) J. N. 93, 108 

Reid, John L. Sr. 103 

Reid, Lucille (Mrs W. N. ) 114 

Reid, Willie N. 19, 33, 34, 176 

Reidsville Highway 17, 34 

Reidsville, N. C. 172 

renovations 7, 10, 11 

reunions 15, 39, 46 

Revival Service 51 

Revolutionary War 40, 49, 152 

Rice, Rev. James M. 5, 126, 136, 137, 141 

Rich, Rev. John 144 

road sign 11, 118 

Roanoke District, Va. Conf. 145 

Pvoberts, Lucille 177, 178 

Roberts, William 165 

Rockingham County 44 



200 



INDEX 

Rocky River M. E. Church 136 

Rose, Anie 87 

Rose, Bedford 87 



Sabbath Day Schools 81 

Salem M. E. Church, Saxapahaw 137, 138 



sanctuary 


7, 9, 10, 11, 52, 89, 




96, 118 


Santa Claus 


110 


Saxapahaw, N. C. 


137 


school 


2, 38 


Scout Hut 


15, 16, 32, 34, 90, 99, 




100, 116, 117, 118, 119 


Scoutmaster 


99, 100, 102, 103, 153 


Secretary, N. C. Conf. 




Sunday Schools 


90 


Shady Grove M. E. Church 


138 


Sharpe, Rev. D. M. 


140 


Sharpe, Rev. Van Bur en A. 


86, 89, 125, 142 


Shiloh Meth. Protestant Church 


136, 137 


Shiloh Missionary Society 


85 


Simpson, C. L. 


173, 174 


Simpson, Faye 


92 


Simpson, Lidia V. 


87 


Simpson, Margaret 


48 


Simpson, R. B. 


86 


Simpson, Roger 


24, 39, 56, 160-162 


Skidmore, Rev. Lewis 


145 


slavery 


147, 148 


slaves 


151 


Smith, Lacy 


103, 112 


Smith, Lula 


51 


Smith, Luthur 


103 


Smith, Mary Lewis 


98 


Smith, Ubert C. 


97, 98, 172 



201 



INDEX 



Smoot, Rev. James F. 


142, 143 


Somers, Ralph 


12, 116 


Somers, Robert 


113 


Somers, Sal lie 


51 


South Carolina Conference 


147, 149, 15 


Speck, Rev. Henry 


144 


Spotts, Rev. Samuel J. 


143 


Stanford, Rev. James T. 


127, 141 


Starnes, Rev. S. J. 


12, 52, 133, 


Starr, Rev. William H. 


145 


station church 


17, 47, 138 


Stevens, Rev. George 


145 


Steward, District 


40 


stewards 


50, 93 


Stony Creek Church 


90, 92 


Stony Creek Church Road 


17 


Summers, W. P. 


85 


Sunday School 


10, 15, 46, 




81-94, 95 



139 



Sunday School Committee, 

N. C. Conference 84 
Sunday School Conference, 

Burlington Circuit 90 
Sunday School Conference, 

Hillsboro District 89 
Sunday School Convention, 

Morton Township 
Sunday School, N. C. Conf. 
Sunday School Record Book 
Sunday School Secretaries 
Sunday School Society, Meth. 
Sunday School Superintendent 
Sunday School Union 
Sutton, Gemnia 
Swepsonville, M. E. Church 



90, 


91, 


92 




90 








91, 


93 






91 








82 








50, 


86, 


91, 


97 


83 








92 








138 









202 



INDEX 



Tar River District, Va. Conf . 

Tatem, I sham 

Taylor, Frona 

Taylor, J. (Clerk of Court) 

Taylor, Rev. R. Frank 

Taylor, Will 

Terrel 1 , I 1 a Matkins 

Thomas, David 

Thomas, Rev. Kenneth 

Thomasson, Catherine 

Thomasson, H. R. 

Thomasson, Tommy 

Thompson, B. C. 

Thompson, Henry 

Thompson, R. A. 

Thompson, Rev. Roger E. 

Thompson, Thomas 

Tickle, Billie Anne 

Til let, Rev. John 

Tinnin, Rev. John W. 

tithe 

Treadway, Rev. Amos C. 

treasurer 

Trinity College District 

Troxler, Daisy Etta Smithey 

Troxler, Edward 

Troxler, Howard 

Troxler, L. Paul 

Troxler' s Lake 
Troxler, Larry 
Troxler, Lewis F. 
Troxler, Lewis F. (Mrs.) 
Troxler, Mary Simpson 



145 

149 

92 

162, 165 

127, 141 

90, 91, 92 

12, 13, 96 

27, 40, 56, 163-165 

112 

114 

93, 116, 175 

99, 101, 105 

167 

24, 39, 56, 160-162 

90, 91, 92 

17, 19, 35, 132, 138, 139 

23, 24, 39, 56, 160-162 

112 

142 

124, 143 

40 

145 

40, 50 

142 

153 

97, 103 

12, 15, 99, 100, 101, 

103, 116, 118, 153 

17, 20, 103, 113, 116, 

118 

119 

101 

97, 98 

51 

7, 9, 10, 19, 95, 96, 

97, 110 



203 



INDEX 



Troxler, Robert Banks 
Troxler, Robert L. 
Troxler, Rockie 

Troxler, Wilbert 
Trull, Shirley 
Trustees 



15, 153 

93, 103, 113, 116, 117 

11, 12, 13, 101, 102, 

103, 105 

113 

97 

2, 4, 17, 21, 22, 24, 29, 

33, 35, 39, 40, 41, 42, 

50, 152, 163, 166, 167, 

169, 170, 172, 175 



Underwood, Ed 
Underwood, J. M. 
Underwood, J. W. 
Underwood, John A. 
Underwood, Rev. John E. 
Union M. E. Church 
Union Ridge M. E. Church 
United Methodist Church 
United Methodist Women 
United Methodist Youth 
Fel lowship 



97 

48 

48 

85 

126, 141 

136 

138 

108, 109, 112, 149 

106, 108, 109 

112 



Vacation Bible School 

vestibule 

Vinant , Sal 1 ie 

Vincent, G. D. 

Virginia Annual Conference 

Votin' Place 



114, 115, 118 

7, 9, 89, 118 

48 

168 

123, 135, 136, 137, 144, 

145, 147, 149, 150 

47 



204 



INDEX 

Wade, Clarence 

Wade, Mr. /Mrs. Robert 

Walker, Alexander 

Walker, Boyd 
*Walker, George Everette 
Walker, Homer 
Walker, Ida 
Walker, John H. 
Walker, Kate Susan 
Walker, Mat (Madison B.) 

Walker, Pauline 
Walker, Susan Jordan 

Wall, Rev. Randy 

War Between the States 

Watlington, Lelia (Mrs. C.L.) 50, 93 

Watson, Alice 

Waynick, D. L. 

Waynick, Met (Mrs. C. M.) 

Wesley, Cnarles 

Wesley, John 

Western Conference 

Western N. C. Conference 

Wesley an Church of England 

Wesley an Service Guild 

Whitehurst, Zeb M. Ill 

Whitesell, Helene Smith 

Whitesell, 0. B. 

Wicker, Lona Mae 

Williams, Rev. Benjamin M. 

Williams, Robert 

Williams, William 

Willing Worker's S. S. Class 

Willis, Rev. R. H. 

*Walker, Galloway 112 



205 



100. 


, 105, 153 


153 






29, 


30, 


32, 48, 85, 


86, 


91, 


166-168 


15, 


175. 


, 176, 177 


15, 


93, 


175, 177 


103 






15, 


175. 


, 177 


86, 


88 




15, 


175. 


, 177 


1, 35, 36, 37, 50, 86, 


88, 


169. 


, 170, 176 


15, 


34, 


175, 177 


30, 


36, 


85, 86, 87, 167, 


168 






12, 


13, 


134, 139 


148 






50, 


93 




92 






90 






109 






95 






81, 


82, 


83, 95, 146, 148 


147 






150 






82 






106, 


, 107, 108 


99, 


103 




96 






118 






96 






143 






149 






24, 


39, 


56, 160-162 


10, 


95 




141 







INDEX 

Wilson, Louise B. 178 

Wirtemburg 81 

Wiseman, Eva 52 
Woman's Division of the 

Board of Missions 108 
Woman's Division, United 

Methodist Church 106, 108 
Woman's Foreign Missionary 

Society 106, 108 
Woman's Home Missionary 

Society 106, 107, 108 

Woman's Missionary Council 107 
Woman's Missionary Society of 

Shiloh Methodist Church 108 
Woman's Society of Christian 

Service 10, 95, 107, 108, 109 

Wood, Rev. John E. 132, 139 

Workman, Elmer 113 

Workman, J. Preston 17, 19 

Wrenn, Therwell 103, 116 

Wright, Rev. W. F. Jr. 19, 133, 139 



Yadkin District, Va. Conf . 144, 145 

Yanceyville Circuit 5, 137, 138, 142 

Yanceyville M. E. Church 138 

Youth Fellowship 15 
Young People's Methodist 

Alliance 111 
Young People's Christian 

League 111 



206 





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DEMCO 38-297 



DIME UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 




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Troxler 



Shiloh a Methodist Church, 1814- 
1984